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Why does Education in America "suck"???

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posted on Jun, 30 2004 @ 05:19 PM
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TEACHERS CAN ONLY TEACH WHAT THEY KNOW...and that's the bottom line...each year since the public system has come into being, the qualityof education of those teaching the future teachers has gone down.

Technology could also be blamed...in the last 150 years society has changed at what one could consider light speed...the faster the technology...the less one has to learn to THINK FOR THEMSELVES...it's up to computers, to show us what we want to know, the television gives everybody the latest news...and so on

want to know why past civilizations failed...because they advanced to a point where they found wars more profitable than peace and technology replaced REAL teaching and learning.

This is just the tip of the iceberg with what is wrong with the school systems today...into that mix we could throw, lack of communication with kids by adults that have no idea how to think outside the box in a progressive manner...parents that do the same thing as the teachers...and quite rightly...because who taught them?....Exactly...the same damaged system which is even more horrific today...

Beleive it or not...within all this mess there are some parents and some teachers that do see possibilities that the majority doesn't...they are willing to accept the fact of INDIVIDUALLITY and teach accordingly...this problem will never go away, or be fixed....until it is completely torn down and rebuilt with less restrictive guidlines.

~oracle




posted on Jun, 30 2004 @ 05:20 PM
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Why does American educational system suck?

because Americans are stupid, thats why.

We wallow in a culture that praises meatheaded stupidity. Being smart makes you a nerd. Being a dumb # who cant spell makes you cool.

We have idiot parents who are 60s washouts who dont care. TV babysit the kids. enforce stupidity. So on and so forth.

Sitting on the couch, getting fat, and not studying and watching TV is in. Actually learning how to find you own country on a map is out.

This crap about broken families is BS. I grew up in a very twisted and broken family, and I ended up not only passing my tests, but even filling my idiot teachers in on a few facts they elft out or got wrong.

Its all a matter of will, and the will of america is to be stoopid. Plain and simple. That, and the teachers, parents, and schoolboards all have thier heads so far of thier own asses they would snap thier necks if they did the twist.

Unless society and cultural values and morals change, America will continue being the laughing stock of the civilized world.



posted on Jun, 30 2004 @ 05:29 PM
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Originally posted by Skadi_the_Evil_Elf
...because Americans are stupid, thats why.


Having education in multiple countries, including the USA...I would say it is because they tend to spend so much time studying themselves. That is why most Americans could not even tell you where Afganistan was 9/11 happened started. They don't know the geography, cultures, or politics of anyone but themselves (and even that is a stretch).

This helps lend to the "world perception" that Americans are ignorant.

I had a geography test one day in 12th grade (USA). I got 125% (because I finished early and added major rivers, seas, and some mountain ranges). The next closest mark in my class? 12 percent!
My teacher almost accused me of cheating, but then I told him my school background.


Q

posted on Jun, 30 2004 @ 11:32 PM
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Granted, we're light-years ahead of most other countries, educationally. Still not good enough. The rest of the world cannot be used as our bar. (No offense, rest of the world!)

Teachers do have to update their skills on a continuous basis. After receiving an initial degree, most teachers are then put to work teaching while furthering their education. Achieving higher degrees is the norm, while workshops, seminars, and the like are virtually required as well.

Not all teachers are good, and not all are admittedly that smart. They are fallible humans, just as anyone else, and they do make mistakes as such. That was one of my worst problems in school, was that in many areas I was already more knowledgeable than my instructors. This caused me no end of trouble. As in any field, "experts" are not fond of having their shortcomings pointed out. Still, I do believe that most teachers are well-intentioned and should be supported in doing the best they can. (They certainly aren't doing it for the money!)

Teacher's hands are effectively tied in numerous ways, so that they must try to teach not as they wish, but as much as they wish and can remain within the guidelines they must follow. Political correctness has been one of the absolute worst influences. A runaway court system that does not allow a teacher to dicipline their student's behavior (which has obviously not been a big concern for the parent!) without being sued doesn't help either.

Unions are a mixed bag. In general, their role of supporting the educators is a needed one, IMO. Good is accomplished. On the other hand, some of their sources of support are indeed questionable in motive and agenda. Overall, I'd say more worth it than not (at least on a local level, nationally seems more shady to me).

Even the best teacher cannot teach those who have no desire to be taught. Failure to instill a love of learning is one of the most costly mistakes parents make. It doesn't matter if your child wears the latest Nikes, plays 15 different sports, and is the coolest in the class if they know Marco Polo as nothing more than a game played in a swimming pool! The moral here is that a teacher cannot make up in one year for what a parent has failed to do in a lifetime. The welfare of the child ultimately rests with the parents. Society sends them to school without exception so that all are given the opportunity to learn--if a parent instills no motivation to do so, then it is not a failure of the system.



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 12:05 AM
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Originally posted by ZeddicusZulZorander

Originally posted by Skadi_the_Evil_Elf
...because Americans are stupid, thats why.


Having education in multiple countries, including the USA...I would say it is because they tend to spend so much time studying themselves. That is why most Americans could not even tell you where Afganistan was 9/11 happened started. They don't know the geography, cultures, or politics of anyone but themselves (and even that is a stretch).

This helps lend to the "world perception" that Americans are ignorant.

I had a geography test one day in 12th grade (USA). I got 125% (because I finished early and added major rivers, seas, and some mountain ranges). The next closest mark in my class? 12 percent!
My teacher almost accused me of cheating, but then I told him my school background.


Wow, that's saddening. I get really frustrated with people's lack of geographical knowledge. When I was a kid I won my school's geography bee every year from 4th grade to 8th grade. One year I made it to the state level. All throughout my school years when I would doodle in boredom, I would draw maps. I'd draw North America country by country, I'd fill in topography and elevation. I remember being 5 years old and noticing a similarity in shape between Cyprus and the United States. I had a lot of disdain for my clasmates who were unaware of the world.

From what I've noticed over my years and by analyzing modern education, I can make a few points. First, with regard to paying a lot of attention to ourselves, it's true...at least it used to be. The United States only borders two countries, and one of them is so very similar to our own. The United States is also very large. Going from country to country in Europe is practically the equivalent of going state to state here. And another thing to realize is America's position in the world. We're on top. People tend to notice those above them in terms of stature rather than those below them. How much do the French really know or care about Belarus? Do the Spanish really care all that much about Tajikistan? I haven't heard too many Canadians talking about Albanian politics. A lot of us don't mean to be arrogant or ignorant, but the truth is a lot of foreigners don't really matter all that much to Americans. It does bother me. It bothers me alot.

Modern education, I think, is a major culprit, probably the primary one. Schools spend too much time telling kids what to think (self-esteem, multicultralism/diversity/ethnic politicking and for some whites->guilt), and basically catering to the least intelligent in a given class so they don't feel left behind. Foreign languages should be emphasized much earlier on. Start in 2nd grade, not 9th grade. And lastly, discpline is almost non-existant, as is dedication. Kids know too much about sex and not enough about math. Being educated is almost stigmatized. I fear there are too many people who are stupid and proud. This has to change.

Dear God, I turned into my grandparents

What the hell happened?

[edit on 1-7-2004 by Eastern_Diamondback]



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 12:10 AM
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Originally posted by Eastern_Diamondback
Wow, that's saddening. I get really frustrated with people's lack of geographical knowledge...


I do too. I love maps, flags, constitutions, and history. I'm well versed in them because I find it all fascinating!
In particular, I love the maps that the National Geographic Society produces... they don't just inform, they're works of art!


Originally posted by Eastern_Diamondback
Dear God, I've turned into my grandparents. What the hell happened?


You grew up!



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 12:59 AM
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The suggestions for change in the American school system are interesting.

Another idea is rewarding students who perform well by moving them out of high school earlier, if they have no interest in post-secondary education, or by letting them take college/uni courses in their senior year.

Also maybe stop making very theoretical courses mandatory (say advanced studies in literature, advanced science courses, advanced math courses), and put more emphasis on courses that have practical importance. Things that come to mind are journalism and statistics, since an informed public would cut out a lot of the corruption that clogs society's arteries.

But there's only so much the government can do. If people don't take personal responsiblity then American education will continue to lag.

[edit on 1-7-2004 by HeirToBokassa]



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 02:00 AM
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Originally posted by ThunderCloud

Originally posted by Eastern_Diamondback
Wow, that's saddening. I get really frustrated with people's lack of geographical knowledge...


I do too. I love maps, flags, constitutions, and history. I'm well versed in them because I find it all fascinating!
In particular, I love the maps that the National Geographic Society produces... they don't just inform, they're works of art!


Definitely. I'm also glad to hear there are other vexillologists out there. If you've never been to this site, you might find want to give it a try:

flagspot.net...


Originally posted by Eastern_Diamondback
Dear God, I've turned into my grandparents. What the hell happened?

You grew up!


Yeah, about 50 years too early!


E_T

posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 03:27 AM
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"Our bombs are smarter than the average high school student. At least they can find Kuwait. "
- A. Whitney Brown

www.military-quotes.com...


Well, maybe Bush just wants to learn about other countries:

"War is God's way of teaching Americans geography."
- Ambrose Bierce



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 04:19 AM
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[edit on 2004-7-2 by Teknik]



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 04:36 AM
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One thing that pops into mind is one course that you "finally" get in college. (Remember I'm from Louisiana...#49 in the education) Philosophy and Critical Thinking courses are not universally in high school. Tey r moor importent then Engrish and Psynce courses.



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 05:26 AM
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I live in New Zealand, so can't exactly judge the quality of US teachers, and also im in private school, so cant say how good public teaching is. Some of our teachers are extremely good, some extremely bad, but generally we have it a lot better than all the kids in third world countries.



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 07:58 AM
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Well, for starters, I'd like to suggest that teachers concentrate more on the core education and stop trying to socially and politically indoctrinate their pupils. We have to draw a line between what a child should earn at home and what a child should learn at school. Religion, social, lifestyle, and athletics need to be the responsibility of parents. Math, science,grammar,spelling, and reading should be taught in schools. Its not the schools place nor duty to teach my child right from wrong. Thats my responsibility. Its the school's responsibility to teach my child the difference between a gerund and participle, what the hell X equals, and what happens when you mix an acid and a base.

But like our government, it has empowered itself with authority it legally does not have. The right to teach my child that it must accept deviate behavior as the norm. Thats a damn dangerous theme to stick in a kids head.



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 11:51 AM
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*horribly offensive post deleted*

[edit on 2-7-2004 by torque]


E_T

posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 12:17 PM
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Signe Wilkinson, Pennsylvania, The Philadelphia Daily News



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 07:17 PM
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Originally posted by torque
I got this in email and instantly thought of this thread. *L*

Could You Have Passed the 8th Grade in 1895?
...Take a Look:

This is the eighth-grade final exam from 1895 from Salina, KS. USA.
It was taken from the original document on file at the Smoky Valley
Genealogical Society and Library in Salina, KS and reprinted by the
Salina Journal.

8th Grade Final Exam: Salina, KS - 1895

Grammar (Time, one hour)
1. Give nine rules for the use of Capital Letters.
2. Name the Parts of Speech and define those that have no modifications.
3. Define Verse, Stanza and Paragraph.
4. What are the Principal Parts of a verb? Give Principal Parts of do, lie, lay and run.
5. Define Case, Illustrate each Case.
6. What is Punctuation? Give rules for principal marks of Punctuation.
7 - 10. Write a composition of about 150 words and show therein that you understand the practical use of the rules of grammar.

Arithmetic (Time, 1.25 hours)
1. Name and define the Fundamental Rules of Arithmetic.
2. A wagon box is 2 ft. deep, 10 feet long, and 3 ft. wide. How many bushels of wheat will it hold?
3. If a load of wheat weighs 3942 lbs., what is it worth at 50 cts. per bu., deducting 1050 lbs. for tare?
4. District No. 33 has a valuation of $35,000. What is the necessary levy to carry on a school seven months at $50 per month, and have $104 for incidentals?
5. Find cost of 6720 lbs. coal at $6.00 per ton.
6. Find the interest of $512.60 for 8 months and 18 days at 7 percent.
7. What is the cost of 40 boards 12 inches wide and 16 ft. long at $20 per m?
8. Find bank discount on $300 for 90 days (no grace) at 10 percent.
9. What is the cost of a square farm at $15 per are, the distance around which is 640 rods?
10. Write a Bank Check, a Promissory Note, and a Receipt.

U.S. History (Time, 45 minutes)
1. Give the epochs into which U.S. History is divided.
2. Give an account of the discovery of America by Columbus.
3. Relate the causes and results of the Revolutionary War.
4. Show the territorial growth of the United States.
5. Tell what you can of the history of Kansas.
6. Describe three of the most prominent battles of theRebellion.
7. Who were the following: Morse, Whitney, Fulton, Bell, Lincoln, Penn, and Howe?
8. Name events connected with the following dates:
1607
1620
1800
1849
1865

Orthography (Time, one hour)
1. What is meant by the following: Alphabet, phonetic, orthography, etymology, syllabication?
2. What are elementary sounds? How classified?
3. What are the following, and give examples of each: Trigraph, subvocals, diphthong, cognate letters, linguals?
4. Give four substitutes for caret 'u'.
5. Give two rules for spelling words with final 'e'. Name two exceptions under each rule.
6. Give two uses of silent letters in spelling. Illustrate each.
7. Define the following prefixes and use in connection with a word: Bi, dis, mis, pre, semi, post, non, inter, mono,super.
8. Mark diacritically and divide into syllables the following, and name the sign that indicates the sound: Card, ball, mercy, sir, odd,cell, rise, blood, fare, last.
9. Use the following correctly in sentences, Cite, site, sight, fane,fain, feign, vane, vain, vein, raze, raise, rays.
10. Write 10 words frequently mispronounced andindicate pronunciation by use of diacritical marks and by syllabication.

Geography (Time, one hour)
1. What is climate? Upon what does climate depend?
2. How do you account for the extremes of climate in Kansas?
3. Of what use are rivers? Of what use is theocean?
4. Describe the mountains of North America.
5. Name and describe the following: Monrovia, Odessa, Denver, Manitoba,Hecla, Yukon, St. Helena, Juan Fermandez, Aspinwall and Orinoco.
6. Name and locate the principal trade centers of the U.S.
7. Name all the republics of Europe and give capital of each.
8. Why is the Atlantic Coast colder than the Pacific in the same latitude?
9. Describe the process by which the water of the ocean returns to the sources of rivers.
10. Describe the movements of the earth. Give inclination of the earth.




just goes to show from my post at the top of the page why i said that people today just don't think...and the quality of those doing the teaching has fallen off the edge of the world...

so...how many here could answer at least 3 of the questions in ALL categories when in 8th grade?...how many who have been to college could pass this test without being able to use aid from a computer?...

something to think about, eh?

~oracle



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 07:50 PM
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Originally posted by OXmanK
Remember I'm from Louisiana...#49 in the education...


Where can I get a list for the U.S. ranking the 50 States, DC, and the 5 territories in their quality of education? I've been looking for a list like that for a long time... a list from at least 2000 would be nice.


Speaking of teaching standards (like the 8th Grade exit exam from the 19th Century U.S.), what subjects do you consider essential for every 18 year old graduating from high school in the U.S. to know? These are the ones that spring to mind immediately... what others can I add?

Math:
Algebra I & II
Geometry & Trigonometry
Calculus I (Derivatives) & II (Integrals)

Science:
Biology
Chemistry I (Inorganic) & II (Organic)
Physics I (Mechanics) & II (Electromagnetics)

Social Studies:
World Geography
U.S. History
World History
Government
Economics I (Macro) & II (Micro)

Language:
English Language
English Literature I (British) & II (American)
World Literature

....What else? I know I need to add some basic computer literacy, and perhaps some basic electronics and mechanics. Anyone got any ideas?



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 08:49 PM
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Funny you should mention your Geography class, Zed...........

I used to cut class and go smoke dope, Vandalize park penches ect. I would only show up to class on test day.

And every test I took in geography, history, and science, I passed 100%. Why?

Because they were teaching the same crap we learned in second grade. At the beginning of the year, id spend time after school, reading my textbooks. I also always liekd the sunjects of geography history and science.

But the fact I could skip class and still pass the tests shows how boring and repetive eductation is today. Its a joke really.

When desert shield started up, my teacher was quite impressed I could not only point out Iraq on the map, but could give a summary history on the place, including recent history. Including how the US was supporting them not two years before in the Iran war.

Go figure.



posted on Jul, 1 2004 @ 10:25 PM
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[edit on 2004-7-2 by Teknik]



posted on Jul, 2 2004 @ 12:21 AM
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Originally posted by Eastern_Diamondback
Definitely. I'm also glad to hear there are other vexillologists out there...


Well, as far as flags goes, here are my two favorite flag websites:

www.flags.net...
www.crwflags.com...

And here's an archive of Constitutions from all the countries in the world:

www.constitution.org...

I also love seeing the websites that governments and international organizations put up. A few examples:

www.firstgov.gov... (the US Government)
www.state.tx.us... (State of Texas; just change the 'tx' to another State's postal abbreviation and you can see any of the 50 States' websites)
www.un.org... (United Nations)
www.nato.int... (NATO)
www.eurunion.org... (European Union, in English)

...Well, you get the idea.



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