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Star System HR 8210: On the Brink of SuperNova?

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posted on Sep, 19 2010 @ 11:59 AM
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Many things affect this Planet's existance that aren't necesarily a part of this planet. Unfortunately, other distant aspects surrounding our tiny spot in stellar existance affect us in major ways that have had - and will have - an impact on our vey existance.

One of those things has been revealed to be formulating into the possibility of a mass extinction event poised to occur in the form of a SuperNova that might occur within our own stellar back yard.

Introducing Star System HR 8210.

The Star System was logged in 1993, but not really looked at until in 2002, when a student at Harvard University studied it.


A student at Harvard University has stumbled across the terrifying spectacle of a star in our galactic backyard that is on the brink of exploding in a supernova. It is so close that if it were to blow up before moving away from us, it could wipe out life on Earth.


Karin Sandstrom was the student who made this discovery (it would be interesting to research where she is today), and it's interesting to note that it took a student who was doing research for a paper to discover such a threat to our existance as something of this nature. I guess it goes to show that there is so much out there to look at that things of this nature slip through the filters so to speak.


The crunch will come when HR 8210's companion begins to run out of fuel. As it expands to form a red giant star, its outer layers will be dumped onto HR 8210, pushing it over the Chandrasekhar limit. "Our initial idea was that this might happen very soon," says Sandstrom's supervisor Dave Latham.


Supernova events that have occurred within our 'back yard' in the past have been recorded in Earth's Geologic Record as having caused mass extinctions in our past

While this SuperNova event is a definite eminant event, Professionals who have taken the time to further research this anomaly have given us a breath of hope in thier findings:


Fortunately, it will take time for HR 8210 to accumulate the mass it needs. Preliminary calculations by Rosanne di Stefano at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center suggest this may take hundreds of millions of years. By that time it will be much further away, she says, though she still needs to confirm exactly how far. "I want to be sure I'm right."


After doing more research on this star I've concluded it to not actually be life threating in the now nor in the near future. However it's items of this nature that we here at ATS keep our eye upon and from time to time report on. the links I've used to research this item are included below.

Special Stars: HR 8210

About Stars: Novae

ESO Report 310

Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrophotometry of HD16538 and HR:8210 Ik-Pegasi




posted on Sep, 19 2010 @ 04:03 PM
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we know of particels with speed op light that will might hit us....we can predict the impact time.....
wat about the particles that goes faster than licht...gravity shocks ..disturbance of time and space..
wich all comes free at an supernova explosion...
point is we can only verifie it in the future...when it is visible...

if the climate chance (EQ / volcanic ) is an effect of it we will know it over approx 150 years when the light of the event will reach us...



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 03:06 AM
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reply to post by ressiv
 


wat about the particles that goes faster than licht...

Luckily, there are no particles that travel 'faster than licht'. Even tachyons are out of fashion.


gravity shocks ..disturbance of time and space.

Since the mass of the universe never varies, 'gravity shocks' are impossible. What is possible are gravitational perturbations caused by the interaction of local masses, but these are quite predictable. Gravitions travel at the speed of light, too.


point is we can only verifie it in the future...when it is visible...

There are plenty of visible supernovas out there for us to study, right now.


we will know it over approx 150 years when the light of the event will reach us...

You could know it in five minutes if the supernova has already exploded, and Earth is just about to enter the blast light cone.



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 03:48 AM
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reply to post by Astyanax
 


O GOD - tell me about the Blast Cone.

This is a compact binary system, of which one star is near critical mass which is basically a 'threat level' B type threat (greatest level being A) as it nears it's end of life - which hearalds in a type 1a SuperNovae. Then with that, we have an even greater problem... something these articles said nothing about!!!

But is logically a scientific given when you do the math...

The white dwarf binary companion, which is said to be about 1.15 times the mass of OUR OWN SUN (for those who don't understand the significance of this please review this article - and pay attention to the teaspoon measurements of stellar material) - is nearing it's critical mass level as well, due to the material it's being fed by it's binary host...

For those who fail to understand the significance of this White Dwarf Star's size in relation to our own sun's size... then understand this: A White Dwarf Remnant should typically only be around the size of Planet Earth...

*click*.....

WOW - 1.15 times the size of our sun, as a white dwarf! and near critical mass to boot....

Once one goes, the companion will surely follow suite, in a double whammy detonation with twin detonation rings expanding outward, and imploding into eachother to more than likely formulate an even greater detonation...

Something known as a HyperNovae... a "threat Level A" type event and one that this planet hasn't seen. At least nowhere in our Galaxy! I can state with almost 100 confidence that this event will formulate a black hole, and it's ability to affect our planet will be inevitable.

~ IF ~ the accretion disk forms at a 90 degree angle to our location, we will be incinerated almost immediately upon observation of the Detonation event in that the Bi Polar Particle Jets Will hit us dead on... literally a massive gamma ray gun being shot at light speed and loaded with about as much material punch as exists in the planet Jupiter. couple that with the dual blast ring that will inevitably come blowing through here shortly after that and you'll get the huge spreading dust cloud effect as it blows away the vaporized remnants of our solar system's incinerated demise.

As a last point of referrence, understand that Hypernovae events become the brightest object within an entire galaxy... rivaling the galaxy core in brightness and intensity!...



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 04:53 AM
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WOW - 1.15 times the size of our sun, as a white dwarf! and near critical mass to boot....


1.15 times the mass of our Sun. It would be impossible for a white dwarf to be as large as the Sun. The Chandrasekhar limit is roughly 1.4 times the mass of the Sun, so it would need to accumulate roughly a quarter of a solar mass from the other star before it becomes unstable, and explodes as a supernova.


edit on 20-9-2010 by Mogget because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 05:09 AM
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reply to post by Mogget
 


I'm confused about your observation...


Mass is the root for the word massive, correct? massive relates to size, correct?

I mean, if we're discussing gravitational properties or density, by far any white dwarf already possesses well beyond those quantities as compared to our sun. so, in your opinion, what does mass represent, if not stellar size?



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 05:57 AM
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reply to post by Heyyo_yoyo
 

I think you need to look up what a light cone is. My post had nothing to do with what you're talking about.

*


reply to post by Heyyo_yoyo
 

'Size' refers to volume, not to mass.



posted on Sep, 20 2010 @ 07:14 AM
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I mean, if we're discussing gravitational properties or density, by far any white dwarf already possesses well beyond those quantities as compared to our sun. so, in your opinion, what does mass represent, if not stellar size?


Mass is the amount of matter that an object contains.
Size is the amount of space that an object occupies.

You seem to be under the impression that gravity acts differently for a white dwarf than it does for our Sun, but that is incorrect. The only difference is that a mass similar to that of the Sun is packed into an object somewhere between the size of Earth and Neptune. The consequence of this is that the gravitational force exerted near the surface of a white dwarf is considerably stronger than it is near the surface of the Sun, but that is only because you would be much closer to the centre of mass of the object. If Earth was orbiting a white dwarf star with mass exactly equal to that of the Sun (and at exactly the same distance), it would "feel" exactly the same gravitational force acting on it.

So, a white dwarf of one solar mass has exactly the same amount of matter inside it as the Sun, but that matter is compressed into a much smaller space. That is why the density is so high.


edit on 20-9-2010 by Mogget because: (no reason given)




edit on 20-9-2010 by Mogget because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 03:49 AM
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From the OP article:


Fortunately, it will take time for HR 8210 to accumulate the mass it needs. Preliminary calculations by Rosanne di Stefano at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center suggest this may take hundreds of millions of years. By that time it will be much further away...


Sorry folks, you still have to go to work/school tomorrow.



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 07:58 AM
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reply to post by Mogget
 


Ah ok.. so mass = density in this case, thanks for the feedback.

In reply to another post:

Pertaining to light cones... I wasn't comparing a light cone to a particle jet. The inclusion of the light cone reminded me of the particle jets, that's all.

No confusion here.



posted on Sep, 21 2010 @ 07:35 PM
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reply to post by Heyyo_yoyo
 


No,

Mass divided by Volume = Density

...in all cases. If the mass stays the same, and the volume decreases, the density increases.

Grade school arithmatic.



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