On the Origin of The American Accent

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posted on Sep, 7 2010 @ 01:27 PM
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As a life long Mid-Westerner, I can tell you that just within a few states, it varies so widely, it's hard to count.

Chicago, Upper Wisconsin, Northern Iowa/Minnesota/North Dakota, St. Louis, and what I'll call Common Southern Iowan are all very different. In fact, on linguist sites, different areas of Chicago are separated.

But to the poster who said Californian is the "American accent", I would say that the SoCal accent (i.e. Jesse James) is totally foreign to what I would expect as non-regional. They say "so" like "sew". Weird.




posted on Sep, 7 2010 @ 02:31 PM
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Originally posted by WickettheRabbit

But to the poster who said Californian is the "American accent", I would say that the SoCal accent (i.e. Jesse James) is totally foreign to what I would expect as non-regional. They say "so" like "sew". Weird.


Being born and bred in SOCA.

What is the difference between "so" and "sew".

I've heard it said the reason CA sound is used - is because it lacks an accent.

I think the CA sound is because we're kind of lazy speakers. SOCA with its all 'round 70 degree temp and over cast skies - - people tend to be outside a lot - - going about their business - - not really that interested in being great communicators.

We say a word in the easiest way possible with as little inflection as possible.

Basically - whatever is simplest.

[edit on 7-9-2010 by Annee]



posted on Sep, 7 2010 @ 02:52 PM
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Originally posted by Annee

Originally posted by WickettheRabbit

But to the poster who said Californian is the "American accent", I would say that the SoCal accent (i.e. Jesse James) is totally foreign to what I would expect as non-regional. They say "so" like "sew". Weird.


Being born and bred in SOCA.

What is the difference between "so" and "sew".


I didn't know how to write it, but I hear it more like "Sue" than Soh.



posted on Sep, 7 2010 @ 03:05 PM
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Originally posted by Annee

Being born and bred in SOCA.

What is the difference between "so" and "sew".



Originally posted by WickettheRabbit
I didn't know how to write it, but I hear it more like "Sue" than Soh.


Oh OK.

In my opinion - it would be "SO". Because that is the easiest pronunciation. Just go with the easiest pronunciation without inflection - - that would be CA.

I don't recall the "sue" sound. But it could be a regional or ethnic pronunciation.

[edit quotes]

[edit on 7-9-2010 by Annee]



posted on Sep, 7 2010 @ 04:51 PM
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reply to post by Annee
 

Think Valley Girl by Frank Zappa. Not necessarily the words, but the inflection and pronunciation.



posted on Sep, 7 2010 @ 05:01 PM
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Originally posted by WickettheRabbit
reply to post by Annee
 

Think Valley Girl by Frank Zappa. Not necessarily the words, but the inflection and pronunciation.



Oh come on - - that doesn't count.

. . . . and Mary's garage - - Mary likes L_________.

Besides Zappa was mostly from Maryland.



posted on Sep, 7 2010 @ 05:04 PM
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reply to post by Annee
 


Has the pronounciation "warsh" been mentioned yet? (For "wash", and "Washington")

My Mom says it that way (she born and raised in SoCal...but her Mom from Ohio?)

Here in DC, listening to NPR and Dianne Rheem, SHE says "Warshington" too....



posted on Sep, 7 2010 @ 05:18 PM
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Originally posted by weedwhacker
reply to post by Annee
 


Has the pronounciation "warsh" been mentioned yet? (For "wash", and "Washington")

My Mom says it that way (she born and raised in SoCal...but her Mom from Ohio?)

Here in DC, listening to NPR and Dianne Rheem, SHE says "Warshington" too....


Both my parents were from Ohio - - my granddaughter teases me all the time on that one.



posted on Sep, 7 2010 @ 05:51 PM
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Southern mountain dialect (as the folk speech of Appalachia is called by linguists) is certainly archaic, but the general historical period it represents can be narrowed down to the days of the first Queen Elizabeth, and can be further particularized by saying that what is heard today is actually a sort of Scottish-flavored Elizabethan English. This is not to say that Chaucerian forms will not be heard in everyday use, and even an occasional Anglo-Saxon one as well.


linky



posted on Sep, 7 2010 @ 08:25 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox

Southern mountain dialect (as the folk speech of Appalachia is called by linguists) is certainly archaic, but the general historical period it represents can be narrowed down to the days of the first Queen Elizabeth, and can be further particularized by saying that what is heard today is actually a sort of Scottish-flavored Elizabethan English. This is not to say that Chaucerian forms will not be heard in everyday use, and even an occasional Anglo-Saxon one as well.


linky


That would be interesting here to hear. Certainly the English were in the USA before the Irish, but not in anything like the same numbers. Has the dialect survived? What's the name of the original British colony? I think it was in Virginia which was name after Elizabeth the First.



posted on Sep, 7 2010 @ 08:31 PM
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reply to post by rizla
 


The first (successful) British colony in America was Jamestown, Virginia.





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