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'Corkscrew' seal deaths probed

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posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 12:32 PM
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Hi all! I just saw a photograph on Earthfiles.com, Linda Morton Howes site.
I was truely shocked. The horrible things that go on in this world. Crimes against animals should be thoroughly investigated and punished to the full extent of the law. I remember being in Northern Ireland in 2005 and marveling at the seals near the beach. I breaks my heart, and scares me to death to think that someone is living on this earth or off it causing this.




posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 12:34 PM
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Hi all! I just saw a photograph on Earthfiles.com, Linda Morton Howes site.
I was truely shocked. The horrible things that go on in this world. Crimes against animals should be thoroughly investigated and punished to the full extent of the law. I remember being in Northern Ireland in 2005 and marveling at the seals near the beach. I breaks my heart, and scares me to death to think that someone is living on this earth or off it causing this.



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 02:16 PM
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Theres no mystery here. As I said that is what a Greenland shark does to its prey.

Greenland Shark


For years large numbers of seal carcasses have washed up on the beaches of Sable Island. The majority of these carcasses reveal a savage attack, with the blubber on the front half of the animal having been peeled off in a spiral shape down to the mid section of the seal. In many cases, some of the blubber is missing. Many believe that these unique kills are the work of Greenland sharks feeding on the seals.



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 05:26 PM
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Originally posted by Sweevo
Ok I got the image uped

**WARNING its not a pretty sight***

i3.photobucket.com...


[edit on 16-8-2010 by Sweevo]


Ouch, its interesting that its deeper to the rear of the seal than in the front which is thicker... its definitely not what the description had me picturing. I pictured a much tighter coil and no were near as deep as that... That most definitely wasnt done by spinning out of an orcas mouth (aren't orca teeth primarily pinning teeth rather than cutting?). And if it was a shark you'd think it would be far more chaotic.

Poor animal.

Heres a thought, if the seal was pulled from the front of a boat through (past the edge of) the prop i could see that pattern being achieved... since the speed, the fact the seal would be suddenly spun as it got washed through and since the tail would move around more than the front it would strike deeper. ie the seal enters from behind the prop going in the opposite direction to the boat, low to begin with as it enters the turbulance behind the prop it gets sucked upwards impacting more of its body into the blade, and being spun around along its length along with the water the props moving?...

It could even be from going in tail first since rather than being sucked into the center of the props wake its being pushed out and away from the prop instead (not sure how that propulsion mechanic works), hence more damage on the tail than the head. Although you'd thik if a seal hit a prop it would get caught up in, rather than passed over its cutting edge.

just a thought.



[edit on 25-8-2010 by BigfootNZ]



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 05:38 PM
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Originally posted by FreeSpeaker
Theres no mystery here. As I said that is what a Greenland shark does to its prey.

Greenland Shark


For years large numbers of seal carcasses have washed up on the beaches of Sable Island. The majority of these carcasses reveal a savage attack, with the blubber on the front half of the animal having been peeled off in a spiral shape down to the mid section of the seal. In many cases, some of the blubber is missing. Many believe that these unique kills are the work of Greenland sharks feeding on the seals.


good find


are the numbers of the shark rising, must have a look see.. well spotted



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 05:39 PM
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Dave Thompson, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist, Sea Mammal Research Unit (SMRU), Scottish Oceans Institute, University of St. Andrews, Fife, Scotland, said to Howe that a boat propeller was not responsible because the spiral cut could only have been done by a single blade, which boat propellers don't have. Multiple blade propellers create a series of short cuts at different angles. At the time of speaking, he knows of no floating machine or boat that could have been in the vicinity and caused such cuts.



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 05:50 PM
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Originally posted by FreeSpeaker
Theres no mystery here. As I said that is what a Greenland shark does to its prey.

Greenland Shark


For years large numbers of seal carcasses have washed up on the beaches of Sable Island. The majority of these carcasses reveal a savage attack, with the blubber on the front half of the animal having been peeled off in a spiral shape down to the mid section of the seal. In many cases, some of the blubber is missing. Many believe that these unique kills are the work of Greenland sharks feeding on the seals.


This opinion is not shared by many marine scientists and fishermen. The photos exhibit wounds that look nothing like some of those shown on Linda Moulton Howe's website. If sharks had been responsible, this would be an old phenomenon, whereas it started only in 1998 or so in the Gulf of St Lawrence, Canada. Clearly, U. K.'s Sea Mammal Research Unit is not convinced that sharks are the explanation, otherwise it would not be spending so much time and effort to research the issue.



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 06:10 PM
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The dates associated with the appearence of these mutiliations coincide with the introduction of ducted pump jets on submarines.

I'd start there.



posted on Aug, 25 2010 @ 11:10 PM
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Originally posted by micpsi
This opinion is not shared by many marine scientists and fishermen.


Where are you getting your info?

Here's more.



As the study proceeded, consideration of the jaw and tooth structure of various sharks suggested that the species responsible for the corkscrew wound might be the Greenland shark Somniosus microcephalus. Discussions with Jack Casey and Wes Pratt (Apex Predators Group, NMFS) and review of historical documents supported this theory, and interviews with Nova Scotian fishermen confirmed that Greenland sharks were certainly in the Sable Island area. While much other `circumstantial evidence' has also implicated this species, until actual attacks are witnessed and documented, the role of the Greenland shark in predation on seals around Sable Island will be a matter of speculation, albeit well-founded speculation.


Source



[edit on 25-8-2010 by FreeSpeaker]



posted on Aug, 26 2010 @ 08:52 AM
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Here's more info on the Greenland Shark from a great site. I know its not confirmed that its the sharks causing this, but all evidence leads that way.


The Greenland shark's dentition determines its feeding technique. The upper teeth, pointy but not serrated, enable the shark to pin its food into position. The bottom teeth, wide and curved sideways, serve to cut the food item by swinging the head in a circular motion. By doing so, the shark cuts out a «cork» of flesh from its victim when it is too large to swallow whole.



Research done at Sable Island, off Nova Scotia, indicates that it is likely a gathering site for the Great white shark and possibly the Greenland shark. The island is a major seal breeding site on the East Coast. Seal carcasses displaying trademark shark-inflicted wounds often wash up on the beaches. Researchers, including GEERG's Dr. Chris Harvey-Clark, have done necropsies on a number of seals that tend to confirm the presence of at least two shark species. Certain specimens are torn to shreds while others show the distinctive corkscrew wound in their fat layer, which is typical of the Greenland shark.


Greenland Shark and Elasmobranch Education and Research Group



posted on Aug, 26 2010 @ 09:15 AM
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Originally posted by BANANAMONTANA
are the numbers of the shark rising, must have a look see.. well spotted


I hve no clue about their numbers rising, but imo I think overfishing is pushing them into other areas in search of food. We know the Greenland Shark will eat sea mammals such as seals but they are normally a deep see fish eater. Perhaps overfishing has lead them to increase their seal hunting as the only option for food?

In the last site I posted there are some strange stories of Greenland Sharks stalking people on the ice or in kayaks. There is even a mention of Greenlands stalking carribou drinking on river shores like crocodiles hunting wilderbeast.


Thats one strange fish.



posted on Aug, 26 2010 @ 09:27 AM
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I suspect Jack the Seal Ripper.

(I don't really. This is actually pretty terrifying, even if it does have a conventional cause. corkscrew wounds right through their heads... ugh. *shudder* I hope they figure it out.)



posted on Aug, 26 2010 @ 09:35 AM
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Originally posted by FreeSpeaker
Here's more info on the Greenland Shark from a great site. I know its not confirmed that its the sharks causing this, but all evidence leads that way.


The Greenland shark's dentition determines its feeding technique. The upper teeth, pointy but not serrated, enable the shark to pin its food into position. The bottom teeth, wide and curved sideways, serve to cut the food item by swinging the head in a circular motion. By doing so, the shark cuts out a «cork» of flesh from its victim when it is too large to swallow whole.



Research done at Sable Island, off Nova Scotia, indicates that it is likely a gathering site for the Great white shark and possibly the Greenland shark. The island is a major seal breeding site on the East Coast. Seal carcasses displaying trademark shark-inflicted wounds often wash up on the beaches. Researchers, including GEERG's Dr. Chris Harvey-Clark, have done necropsies on a number of seals that tend to confirm the presence of at least two shark species. Certain specimens are torn to shreds while others show the distinctive corkscrew wound in their fat layer, which is typical of the Greenland shark.


Greenland Shark and Elasmobranch Education and Research Group



very interesting and thank you for the links, yes I do agree the wounds are very similar and it does state research into the shark is ongoing.

good find



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 02:33 AM
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My theory is that the cork screw cut is made when the seals are thrown into a hopper and then via a mechanically driven screw feeder dumped back into the ocean as waste product from a large Fishing Vessel.



[edit on 30-8-2010 by mazzroth]



posted on Aug, 30 2010 @ 03:14 AM
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Definetly being done with fishing line.
The seal is being wrapped with fishing line. Then the line is attached to
something very powerful, then pulled very hard and very fast. Zips the
animal wide open leaving an unidentifiable wound. Prolly fisherman.
Definetly man.

[edit on 30-8-2010 by randyvs]



posted on Sep, 19 2010 @ 04:46 AM
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The other day I was listening to coast to coast AM and Linda Molton Howe interviewed this Phd. This man also mentioned that the shoulderblades of the seals were dislocated with force.

Anyways, I wasn't wearing my tinfoil-hat at the time and so my first thought was cattle mutilation at sea?




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