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I was invited to join the masons

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posted on Jun, 18 2004 @ 10:49 PM
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I had a chance meeting with an aquaintance today. We spoke for quite a while mason came up we spoke some more. I was invited to meet this group, what age ranges is this from all income levels? Should i go Should i join? Please an active mason please inform me of the truth.




posted on Jun, 18 2004 @ 10:58 PM
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Well, if you feel like it is for you, I say join. There are no society statuses or monetary limits on who can join. Age can vary, but probably mostly 18-21 (at least) depending on the area. It is definately been a great journey for me so far. I say if you have a chance and it sounds like it suits you as a person, go ahead and join. If not, then just say no thanks. You will never be pushed to join. If you have any specific questions, there are quite a few of us and we will try to answer your questions.


[edit on 18-6-2004 by JCMinJapan]



posted on Jun, 18 2004 @ 11:10 PM
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thank you for bein honest and rational about this as people get carried away at times.


What is the purpose of the masons? What is thier function in society?


Thank You



posted on Jun, 19 2004 @ 12:44 AM
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There has been SO much written about this, but I will give you the twentyfive word answer:

Masonry is a fraternity of men with a faith in god, seeking to be better men, in service to god, their country, their families and themselves by the study of morality, taught by allegory and illustrated with symbols.

Its a group of good men, associating with each other, working toward commons goals, helping their community and each other. Its the world's oldest fraternity, and the model upon which all fraternities and service organizations are founded. The United States was founded on Masonic principles, and 17 presidents of this country have been masons, including George Washington, Theodore Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman and Gerald Ford.

Paul Revere was a Mason, as was Benjamin Franklin and John Hancock. Thirteen signers of the Constitution were Masons, and nine of the signers of the Declaration of Independence.

Masonry is not a service organization, though it does serve. Over $700 million USD are donated by Masonic organizations every year in the United States and Canada, primarily from the Shriners organization, which you have to be a Mason in order to join.

As a Mason, you automatically have friends and brothers around the world. I have a friend in Canada, in the Victoria lodge named Takis, whom I have never met, but have worked with on the internet on some projects. Being a mason, you will be a part of the greatest group of men I have ever had the privledge of knowing and associating with.

Give it serious consideration, as there is not a finer group of men or a better group to be associated with in your life.



posted on Jun, 20 2004 @ 11:05 PM
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Originally posted by theron dunn
There has been SO much written about this, but I will give you the twentyfive word answer:

Masonry is a fraternity of men with a faith in god, seeking to be better men, in service to god, their country, their families and themselves by the study of morality, taught by allegory and illustrated with symbols.

Its a group of good men, associating with each other, working toward commons goals, helping their community and each other. Its the world's oldest fraternity, and the model upon which all fraternities and service organizations are founded. The United States was founded on Masonic principles, and 17 presidents of this country have been masons, including George Washington, Theodore Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman and Gerald Ford.

Paul Revere was a Mason, as was Benjamin Franklin and John Hancock. Thirteen signers of the Constitution were Masons, and nine of the signers of the Declaration of Independence.

Masonry is not a service organization, though it does serve. Over $700 million USD are donated by Masonic organizations every year in the United States and Canada, primarily from the Shriners organization, which you have to be a Mason in order to join.

As a Mason, you automatically have friends and brothers around the world. I have a friend in Canada, in the Victoria lodge named Takis, whom I have never met, but have worked with on the internet on some projects. Being a mason, you will be a part of the greatest group of men I have ever had the privledge of knowing and associating with.

Give it serious consideration, as there is not a finer group of men or a better group to be associated with in your life.


Wow

I am not religous, you mentioned god a few times in there. The man that invited me seemed a little religous also. He gave me what appears to be a silver gaurdian angel is this associated with the masons also. I explained to him i was not religous he did not seem bothered.


RR

posted on Jun, 20 2004 @ 11:18 PM
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Being invited to meet with and to join are two totally different things. You may have been invited to a meeting that isn't closed to non members but I seriously doubt you were invited to join as masons do not approach non members for membership.



posted on Jun, 20 2004 @ 11:28 PM
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Originally posted by RR
Being invited to meet with and to join are two totally different things. You may have been invited to a meeting that isn't closed to non members but I seriously doubt you were invited to join as masons do not approach non members for membership.

What was offer is the following.
1. A petiotion
2. Help in joining


So i dont know that sound like i am being asked to join to me. I was also informed of dues and such



posted on Jun, 21 2004 @ 01:18 AM
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Legion

There is no requirement to be a religious person , whatever that means.

But, your friend should have told you that the one question you must answer yes to is " Do you believe in a supreme being" no man can be accepyed if he does not.



posted on Jun, 21 2004 @ 01:32 AM
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I dont think you should join them there a funny lot and really you dont have any idear what you are signing up for.I means its not like its a golf club where you can see if its your thing before signing up you just have to hope for the best .

Take up golf that what i say



posted on Jun, 21 2004 @ 01:47 AM
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Golf???

Legion, there are three requirements to being a mason:

1) You have to be a man, of lawful age, and competent
2) You must believe in god, by whatever name or manner you know him and believe in the immortality of the soul
3) You must be a good man.

You will get so much more out of Masonry that you will ever put into it, which every Mason will attest to... the more you put into it, the more you get back... its awesome.



posted on Jun, 21 2004 @ 03:33 AM
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you have the internet, why not research it from both persepectives for and against. there are tons and tons of information online about masonary.

Research so you can at least make an informed decision



posted on Jun, 21 2004 @ 04:05 AM
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Back in the early 90's my brother asked me for some advice. He had been invited to join the masons and had only heard the standard 'Evil masonic satanist' crap. So he asked what I would do.

I told him that the Masons are a decent bunch of people (well, the ones I know are) and that if I was invited to join, I would do so.

Knowing that I have researched various things, he took my advice and joined. Needless to say, he now enjoys the meetings and the drink afterwards.



posted on Jun, 21 2004 @ 09:28 AM
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Originally posted by Pisky
I told him that the Masons are a decent bunch of people (well, the ones I know are) and that if I was invited to join, I would do so.


Pisky, seriously, in most places except Australia, it is considered anti-Masonic to invite someone to join. In my jurisdiction the penealty for "soliciting membership" is expulsion. So if you want to become a Mason, just ask! After all, I heard in different posts that you are a Wiccan and therefore believe in a supreme being, and you seem a decent person, so go ahead!

[edit on 21-6-2004 by AlexKennedy]



posted on Jun, 21 2004 @ 10:27 AM
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Originally posted by AlexKennedy
Pisky, seriously, in most places except Australia, it is considered anti-Masonic to invite someone to join. In my jurisdiction the penealty for "soliciting membership" is expulsion.
[edit on 21-6-2004 by AlexKennedy]


Why is it different in Australia Alex?



posted on Jun, 21 2004 @ 10:34 AM
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Originally posted by AlexKennedy
Pisky, seriously, in most places except Australia, it is considered anti-Masonic to invite someone to join. In my jurisdiction the penealty for "soliciting membership" is expulsion. So if you want to become a Mason, just ask!



Not in the UK any more either, Alex.
We can invite too.

I tend to stick to the old way though. If a prospective candidate really wants to be a freemason, he will ask you anyway.



posted on Jun, 21 2004 @ 10:37 AM
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So my uncle passed away this last week, the funeral was last Wednesday, and it turns out he was a Shriner. From what I could figure out he was at the top of the Roanoke Virginia Lodges but nobody is willing to tell me more. His shriners hat was laid beside him in the casket as I was told it could not be passed on to someone else as nobody was at the same rank as he. What does that mean?

His Obit has all the Mason stuff on it.

obituaries.roanoke.com...

BTW, he was a McCoy of the Hatfield and McCoy's.



posted on Jun, 21 2004 @ 11:04 AM
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Originally posted by The Axeman
Why is it different in Australia Alex?


I actually don't know the historical reasons behind it... ML may know. The Australian Grand Lodges (and now apparently the UK ones) allow it, but to us it is anethema. It's weird that we co-recognise, but I don't claim to understand the extremely complicated politics of Grand Lodge recognition.



posted on Jun, 21 2004 @ 11:49 AM
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I was always under the impression one could not be invited. Freemasonry is a choice you have to seek out. A true mason will never invite someone from my knowledge.



posted on Jun, 21 2004 @ 12:38 PM
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Originally posted by Orangemonkey
I was always under the impression one could not be invited. Freemasonry is a choice you have to seek out. A true mason will never invite someone from my knowledge.


That is what i am begining to understand. My late grandfater was a mason he never spoke of it. I mentioned this to the gentelman did this make a difference in inviting me?


The reason i have not done any internet research is i want the truth. I prefer to ask for info on this directly as there is obviously a bunch of misleading info out on it.



posted on Jun, 21 2004 @ 01:44 PM
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Orangemonkey,

I believe your question was answered above, there seems to be some regions that do invite people, and some that don't.

Leigon,


The reason i have not done any internet research is i want the truth. I prefer to ask for info on this directly as there is obviously a bunch of misleading info out on it.
I think that is a wise choice. A few things I would like to point out to you, if I may. 1. Look at the men that make up your local lodge, and type of people they are in the community. 2. Look at the orginizations the Masons align themselfs up with, or created, and what those orginizations do. 3. Was your grandfather a good man?

I know this doesn't answer specific questions, but I came to my conclusion pretty much doing it this way. Actions speak louder then words. And by all accounts, when I researched Freemasonry, they act the way they say they are. Hope this gives you a few extra ideas to look into. Good luck.



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