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Study: Build mosques to prevent Islamic radicalism

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posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 04:50 PM
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Study: Build mosques to prevent Islamic radicalism


rawstory.com

The efforts by some groups to prevent the construction of mosques could backfire, suggests a recent study that urges the building of Muslim community centers and mosques as a way of preventing Islamic radicalism.
...
The study, put together by researchers at Duke University and the University of North Carolina and released in January, could shed new light on the recent outbreak of anti-mosque sentiment among some groups, sparked by the controversy over illegal immigration and the construction of a mosque and Muslim community center near Ground Zero in Manhattan.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.nytimes.com




posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 04:50 PM
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Makes sense to me.

It's when people feel shunned and ostracized that feelings of resentment and hatred grow.

It's when people don't know someone or live in ignorance of something that they fear it.

There might be some validity here. It's certainly something to think about and consider.

rawstory.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 04:52 PM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


They build mosques, no one has stopped them.

Ok so with that in mind I guess it is ok for us to resent the countries where Christians are persecuted and churches are not allowed to be built and Christians converts killed for proselytizing?



www.bbc.co.uk...

[edit on 043131p://bSunday2010 by Stormdancer777]



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 04:55 PM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


How do they define radicalism? Many would call preaching radicalism and anything that dares to convert radicalism. What is their definition?



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 04:58 PM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 

I don't believe anyone here has said anyone has stopped them.

If you're referring to the efforts where people are trying to stop them versus the fact that thus far none of the efforts has succeeded, well there's a very small difference between stopping them and trying to stop them. Just a step along the same path as far as the type of damage this study discusses goes.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 05:08 PM
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reply to post by Gorman91
 

They use the standard definition of radicalization.

I'm not sure exactly what it is you're asking. Have you read the study? It's only 64 pages...took me about 30 minutes to read and think about.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 05:16 PM
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So then what exactly the study suggest? Governments all around the globe should pay for Mosques and Muslim community centers?
Sorry - this is job of Muslim communities them-self.
As for anti-Muslim sentiment - yeah it can increase radicalization. But in some cases it is not anti-Muslim sentiment but a constructive critique or even harmless Southpark episode that could increase radicalization, it is not a reason to shut people up completely.
If anything can increase radicalization - except countries world wide slowly converting (this is exactly what government investing in religious institutions means), then problem is not in those outside i recon.
So i disagree with this conclusion. Lots of reasons are responsible for relatively large number of fanatics in modern Islam. But until Muslims them-self would not work out how to live as equals beside non-Muslim majority nothing will work.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


My compute cannot read it (I have CS5, God knows why). I'm just curious as to what is defined as a radical. Because Atheists would call Christians praying in strong emotions as radicalized, and Christians would call Muslims bowing radicals, etc etc. The little bit that my computer did open seems to indicate it as a study by Muslims? I don't know because it failed to open properly. Point is, what is their definition of a radical.

As I stated earlier, the mosque in NYC is pretty much a matter of speech because it is about preaching their views to the community. Religion also because it is obviously religious, but it is definably moreover speech due to the location and issues at hand.

I just didn't understand it when they were claiming it enriches the community diversity, when the point of any religious building is to grab as many people's attention as possible and conform them to their religion.

To that end the land spot is great. It's perfect for such a plan. You basically advertise to a massive amount of people.

But to return to the topic. What is their definition of a radical. IE, will there be a Muezzin? And how loud will he be? That to me borders a twitch on radical because while any religious building has a right to ring its bells and what not, to actively call people to prayer is a tad bit over that freedom. It's currently illegal to pray on federal grounds, so I am somewhat wondering about the... terms of service, if you will, if there even is a Muezzin.

Anywho. Yea. What's their definition of radical?



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 05:19 PM
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I think that would be the worst reason to build one and is the definition of terror in my opinion. Do this or something bad will happen is the wrong message to send out if you want something done. I think the argument to be made here is build them because we're America where we recognize all as equals and we respect your culture and you have the freedom to worship how and who you want to.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 05:28 PM
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reply to post by VintageEnvy
 





Do this or something bad will happen is the wrong message to send out if you want something done.



Good point, and that is exactly what has been happening.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 05:30 PM
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I believe the problem is one of fear, a lack of trust, and pr on both sides of the issue. Many people watch the news, read the papers, and believe what we are told. When reports come out of countries with a high muslim population, what we would consider barbaric and horrible, tend to frighten many of the people. And rightly so, as some of such are terrifying to think or read about. Personally I have met muslims in the past, and have had mixed feelings on both. My first real contact was very favorable, and pleasent, as the family was nice and polite, and I responded in kind. Then I moved to a community with a large muslim population and have gotten the opposite reaction, as they are not the most friendliest of people, tending to speak in farsi, or their native tongues, and are often rude.
Now according to what I have read, and seen, there have been alot more and more of the radical extremist muslims growing in the United States, coming from the larger cities and mosques. They tend to be from all walks of life and have been recruited to start carrying out terrorist attacks against the US. Now that causes fear, and fear is what is driving many in the US to start to question if a muslim community needs another mosque, or a new school in the US. The Imman in New York, who wants to build a Mosque and community center 2 blocks away from Ground Zero is a good example of such, where he is not listening to the people who are opposed to it, rather stating that they are racist. That is not bridge building, and the other muslim groups, there are questions that are coming up, about their ties to actual know terrorist groups around the world, and about what they really are doing here in the US, when no one is looking. On the PR side, when ever I see or read about an extremist group doing an act of violence, I do look for statements by the different muslim groups. The language they use is not what I would want to see or read, if they are wanting my support or the publics. Any one can condem an act or a person, but they need to start standing up and issuing statements in stronger language, stand up and say, If you do, then it is not heaven you are going to, but to the other place. Stronger language against the extremist elements, and seeking to actually reach out to all of the community would gather them more support, than what they are doing now. Right now, many of the muslims in the western world need to keep a low profile, build on their PR and start to show the people that they are here for the country, using strong language against the acts of violence from the extremist. Until then, no one really is going to trust them fully and look at them with fear.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 05:37 PM
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Originally posted by Stormdancer777
reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


They build mosques, no one has stopped them.

Ok so with that in mind I guess it is ok for us to resent the countries where Christians are persecuted and churches are not allowed to be built and Christians converts killed for proselytizing?

www.bbc.co.uk...

[edit on 043131p://bSunday2010 by Stormdancer777]


No, you're wrong.

People DO stop Muslims from building mosques. Regularly.

The childish repsonse you've written out here really shows the calibre of your argument. Do unto others as they would do to you? An eye for an eye?

How very typically Christian of you.

If Christians are 'supposed' to behave like that because of their religion, then so be it - let them be persecuted and murdered etc. Your argument suggests that is the correct response to religious difference after all.

I'm sure there's a Christian forum out there somewhere for you where nobody will mind you saying this drivel.

Parallex.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by Parallex
 


I think he was actually posting on the double standard of the very little stopping of Mosques in the liberal western world as opposed to the vast blocking of churches in the very closed off eastern world.

I fail to see where he said do back what they are doing to you. That was what you added in to twist it.

That's a real simple fact. There is a double standard. Ok, so it's not 100% But it is the rule of thumb overwhelmingly.

That's the real danger here. When we let the catholics in that was one of the fears. Of course we managed that issue pretty easily.

[edit on 8-8-2010 by Gorman91]



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 05:42 PM
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A above poster wrote, about the Christian churches that are not allowed to be built in most middle eastern countries, and very limited and controlled in China and other communist states.

I dont realy like the idea of the building a mosque downtown New York. Yet this is the United States and freedom must be for all faiths. I do not want to be like the countries mentioned and forbid freedom to take place. I peronally hate Islam, yet because we are free people, of a free United States I must deal with those that practice that faith.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by Parallex
 


You completely misunderstood my post , because you were in such a hurry to bash who you presumed to be a Christian.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 05:43 PM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


I wouldnt think you were a Christin by your pic you seem to be a shammin



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 05:44 PM
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reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


Yea I noticed Parallex has a tendency to be a hot head to religion and sometimes says retarded things. He is smart though, so you'll have to forgive him for his hot hotheadedness.



posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 05:45 PM
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reply to post by Gorman91
 





I think he was actually posting on the double standard of the very little stopping of Mosques in the liberal western world as opposed to the vast blocking of churches in the very closed off eastern world.

I fail to see where he said do back what they are doing to you.


Thank you Gorman,

and I am a she.




posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 05:46 PM
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Originally posted by Gorman91
reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


Yea I noticed Parallex has a tendency to be a hot head to religion and sometimes says retarded things. He is smart though, so you'll have to forgive him for his hot hotheadedness.


LOL, oh I have had worse said to me on this forum.




posted on Aug, 8 2010 @ 05:47 PM
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reply to post by ZeroKnowledge
 

Please read at least the article before commenting. It's clear from your response that you read neither the article, the article referenced from the article, nor the study.

No one is suggesting governments build mosques. That is a suggestion to the Muslim communities.




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