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Hybrid Airplanes developed by Boeing

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posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 04:55 PM
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After examining various subsonic and supersonic concepts, the teams came up with configurations that met the NASA-stated goals for dramatic improvements in operational and environmental performance over today's aircraft.

Source: www.boeing.com...

Boeing is engaged in developing greener, more economical aircrafts technologies for the future of Civil Aviation. Do not expect them to get sold until 20 years in the future.




posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 05:49 PM
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I am auming the electric hybrid type is thee charged weing effect they use on the B2 bombers?
This may be close to the same efficiency of the B2 with its positively charged leading edges and negatively charged trailing one....the rumoured anti gravity drive....
Anybody know if this is the same concept they are referring to in the article?



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 06:02 PM
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reply to post by stirling
 


I don't think so, it's more about turbine efficiency. But I am in no way an engineer.

Do we have an aeronautical engineer in the room?



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 06:22 PM
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I'm an electrical engineer if that's close enough. If not you get what you pay for here ...

The supersonic plane looks a lot like the old Concorde, but with a V-tail. V-tails have been long known as a good design, not sure why they were not used more often.

The subsonic plane looks like a low speed design. Basically that shape is like a 200mph personal aircraft. But they're scaling it up and hoping to get, I guess, a higher speed. Normally a delta wing provides less drag at high speed but this has a straight wing. It's also unusual to have the wing above the body, because one needs strong enough supports to ensure the body does not drop off the bottom of the wing.

I don't know what efficiency they plan to get from hybrids. Maybe the idea is to charge the batteries and use them for takeoff. For the rest of the flight, especially subsonic, you don't need such a strong engine, so you can use a lighter turbine and save fuel. Although you have to carry the weight of the batteries, but if they're lithium-ion batteries, I guess the weight tradeoff works out.

Another idea is that the end of the flight and when engine-braking on the runway, you can somewhat recharge the batteries, similar to regenerative braking in electric and hybrid cars.



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 06:27 PM
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reply to post by oniongrass
 


Thank you very much oniongrass, that cleared things up a lot in my little marketer's head. Maybe I should take some of those free classes from MIT.



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 06:30 PM
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thats so weird i was drawing a prototype of a magnetic microwave engine i had in mind, that uses the air, as fuel since we only need to condense the air into water, then we split that into hydrogen and ionizes the hydrogen into a gas then feed it into the magnetic fields to compress it with fresh air and burn it while the compression is insane, hmm i have just to many ideas maybe NASA should give me that 1 million dollars i could probably build something like that


here is my magnetic microwave engine




posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 06:33 PM
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reply to post by aspx
 


Calculate the energy used condensing the air to water, and extracting hydrogen from water. Then see if you get enough energy back in the remainder of your process to overcome that, plus lift the massive machinery needed to do all that.



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 06:58 PM
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reply to post by oniongrass
 


yes i'm aware of that " condensing the air to water "
its not big of a problem because 90% of the flow is just fresh air, the 10% is like a mini bomb implosion inside the engine, im thinking just to ride the air, like a tornado and have very strong magnetic fields compress hydrogen with incoming air. thus we only need little energy to create a powerful flow, similar to scram jet technology i would like to believe



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 07:08 PM
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reply to post by aspx
 


You may be interested in that thread : www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 07:37 PM
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Originally posted by aspx
reply to post by oniongrass
 


yes i'm aware of that " condensing the air to water "
its not big of a problem because 90% of the flow is just fresh air, the 10% is like a mini bomb implosion inside the engine, im thinking just to ride the air, like a tornado and have very strong magnetic fields compress hydrogen with incoming air. thus we only need little energy to create a powerful flow, similar to scram jet technology i would like to believe


And where does that 10% come from? Even at 86 deg F, you get about 3% water vapor. When you get to the flight levels where drag allows transonic/supersonic flight, the water vapor density asymptotically approaches 0. And can I ask how you would get thrust from an "implosion"?



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 07:50 PM
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Originally posted by stirling
I am auming the electric hybrid type is thee charged weing effect they use on the B2 bombers?
This may be close to the same efficiency of the B2 with its positively charged leading edges and negatively charged trailing one....the rumoured anti gravity drive....
Anybody know if this is the same concept they are referring to in the article?
I guarantee that there is no anti-gravity drive in the B-2. I lol'd though.


Originally posted by gagol
Source: www.boeing.com...

Boeing is engaged in developing greener, more economical aircrafts technologies for the future of Civil Aviation. Do not expect them to get sold until 20 years in the future.


Great post

"Green" in aerospace is a very hot buzzword right now.
Check out Lockheed Martin's submission last year (looks like a missile!) as well as the others at: www.aeronautics.nasa.gov...

Also, Aerovironmental has been working on some interesting projects over the last few years. Subsonic, but very efficient. As a matter of fact Global Observer is an interesting platform for a small EO/IR payload.




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