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Bizarre Accident on US-59 [Texas], Passenger Flown Out

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posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 01:12 PM
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The flipping pick-up and fortuitous landing of the cab in a sinkhole in east Texas is mildly intriguing.

Doc Velocity's enthusiasm on the subject is actually entertaining.

Doc, where is the river bed in texas where the dinosaur tracks are at?




posted on Aug, 1 2010 @ 01:39 PM
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reply to post by Doc Velocity
 


This is a great story, but Texas is also covered in limestone. I live in the Permian Basin, where we have various layers of rich clay, coral stone, and limestone. I was just marvelling last night at a building made of local stone that looked like it was covered in/made out of fossilized worm burrows. Criss crossing tubular shapes in the limestone/sandstone mix that we have out this way.

Get down to San Antonio and you see tons and tons of limestone.

Limestone is well known for wearing away easily in water, and it is this characteristic that makes the area so well known for its groundwater (i love the aquifer water in that area...i believe it is Edwards Aquifer as well).

Most of San Antonio uses this limestone as a feature. The Sis Flags is built up against a limestone cliff, and they bounce lasers off of it for show. The Sunken Garden Amphiitheater sits right down by the river walk (i saw Five Finger Death Punch and Three Days Grace there recently). It is a spiral hole dug in to allow such shows to be played while not hearing it in the rest of the downtown area (amazing engineering, honestly).

The area is also riddled with places like the Natural Bridge Caverns, and dozens of other cavern sites. All boasting cavern tours and dinosaur bones.

Finally, the oil drilling creates a major problem. As the oil vacates the area, water is often pumped in its place. Viscosity leads to a problem as the water seeps out (mostly due to the fracture drilling process). leaving a future sinkhole.

Texas is full of sinkholes. Just like Mexico and central America, and the rest of the southeastern united states.

_____________________________________________________________

To the poster who asked about the dinosaur tracks, check the Paluxy River, in Glen Rose, TX (in the D/FW metroplex). While you are there, visit the nearby Fossil Rim. Great family experience as you drive through a nature reserve with various antelopes, giraffes, etc. I would also recommend the Fort Worth Botannical Gardens. Stunning.



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 10:02 AM
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Originally posted by badgerprints
Doc, where is the river bed in texas where the dinosaur tracks are at?

Well, there are a few of those, although most of them are on private land and are not publicized, for obvious reasons — looters will go out there and chip the dino tracks right out of the limestone bed.

One of the best known areas for dinosaur tracks is up in Llano, Texas (which is almost dead-center of the State) and another hot area is Iraan, Texas (about the same latitude as Llano, but much farther west).

— Doc Velocity



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 10:29 AM
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Originally posted by Doc Velocity

Originally posted by badgerprints
Doc, where is the river bed in texas where the dinosaur tracks are at?

Well, there are a few of those, although most of them are on private land and are not publicized, for obvious reasons — looters will go out there and chip the dino tracks right out of the limestone bed.

One of the best known areas for dinosaur tracks is up in Llano, Texas (which is almost dead-center of the State) and another hot area is Iraan, Texas (about the same latitude as Llano, but much farther west).

— Doc Velocity


The Iraan area is near Ozona, where the fossilized foot in a boot was found.

Lots of fossils in the region, too. Lots of oils, as well.

Iraan-Sheffield ISD are among the wealthiest schools in America. Not sure about current stats, but in 92 they were worth over 5 billion. That little AA school had a nice field with an underground watering system. Their field was nicer than any field I have ever played on (I played college ball, too).

Lots of indian relics in the area as well.

Sorry....you are just talking about my backyard (and no one ever really wants to talk about it unless it includes "illegal immigration").



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 10:23 PM
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Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
Sorry....you are just talking about my backyard (and no one ever really wants to talk about it unless it includes "illegal immigration").

I know what you mean... I'm a native Texan from an OLD Texas family (from even before statehood), and I've lived and traveled and explored all over the Lone Star.

We were out on private land near Vanderpool one day about 25 years ago, following a real gullywasher the night before. We hiked into a canyon and found the floor of the canyon just completely devoid of sand and gravel — just a pure limestone bed with large limestone rocks and boulders. It was so bright it actually hurt your eyes to look at it, like a canyon of bleached bone.

There were dinosaur tracks of the three-toed predator variety that came right out of the canyon wall, across the canyon, and disappeared into the far canyon wall. Some large, elephant-like sauropod tracks, as well.

When we got back to the ranch house and told the owner, he didn't say a word. Just put his finger to his lips and said "Shhhhhhh" very ominously. At the time, he was butchering a side of beef, and he had a big cleaver in his hand.

We got the message.

— Doc Velocity



posted on Aug, 2 2010 @ 10:26 PM
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Great news, this one could go into that new syncronicity thread...

This is a mind blower for sure.



posted on Oct, 24 2010 @ 08:15 AM
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I'm from Livingston grew up there and have spent a lot of time in the woods and everywhere in between. If you click the link you'll see the actual photo's taken and it's in the median between the north and southbound lanes of US 59. Extensive work has been going on making new shoulders on the inside of the highway so people can turn left and crossover the median. Not long ago this entire section was bulldozed and I'm 100% sure this is not a sinkhole. Some people aren't that smart to realize this and report that it's a sinkhole.

www.polkcountytoday.com...



posted on Nov, 1 2010 @ 01:45 PM
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My folks are from West Texas (Big Spring area) and when we would wander about Cherokee Park after the rains, we would find some interesting stuff... even the rocks they used to build the tourist area (pfft, like its a hot tourist place) have seashell fossils.

I like being out there cause there are still pottery shards and stuff out there.



posted on Nov, 1 2010 @ 01:56 PM
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Just a heads up that this is a very old thread... July of this year.



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