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Need help understand Buddhism!!

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posted on Dec, 12 2010 @ 10:19 PM
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Originally posted by etherical waterwave
Christians fight and suffer. There are knowledgeseekers and militarymen. Christianity is misunderstood. We do not worship statues. There is only one God, just like in buddhism Brahma is. Brahma is God. Krishna the way. Knowledge what is stated with the religion. Peace and conformity. After reading the bible myself there is the greatest explanation of what is going on in the world. False christians thou hast met what made you think wrong things. They are untrue.


Buddhist don't worship or believe in a God. It's not necessary. Here is the Buddhist belief for clarification:



3. Buddhism and the God-idea
Question: Do you Buddhists believe in god? Answer: No, we do not. There are several reasons for this. Like mod- ern sociologists and psychologists, the Buddha saw that many religious ideas and especially the god-idea have their origin in anxiety and fear. The Buddha says:
‘Gripped by fear people go to the sacred mountains, sacred groves, sacred trees and shrines.’ Dp.188
Primitive humans found themselves in a dangerous and hostile world, the fear of wild animals, of not being able to find enough food, of injury or disease, and of natural phenomena like thunder, lightning and volcanoes was constantly with them. Finding no security, they created the idea of gods in order to give them comfort in good times, courage in times of danger and consolation when things went wrong. To this day you will notice that people often become more religious at times of crises, you will hear them say that the belief in their god or gods gives them the strength they need to deal with life. Often they explain that they believe in a particular god because they prayed in time of need and their prayer was answered. All this seems to sup- port the Buddha’s teaching that the god-idea is a response to fear and frustration. The Buddha taught us to try to understand our fears, to lessen our desires and to calmly and courageously accept the things we cannot change. He replaced fear with rational understanding not with irrational belief.

The second reason the Buddha did not believe in a god is because there does not seem to be very much evidence to support this idea. There are numerous religions, all claiming that they alone have god’s words preserved in their holy book, that they alone understand god’s nature, that their god exists and that the gods of other religions do not. Some claim that god is masculine, some that she is feminine and oth- ers that it is neuter. They are all satisfied that there is ample evidence to prove the existence of the god they worship but they scoff at the evidence other religions use to prove the existence of other gods. It is surprising that despite so many religions using so much ingenuity over so many centuries to prove the existence of god that there is still no real, concrete, substantial or irrefutable evidence for such a being. Buddhists suspend judgement until such evidence is forthcoming.

The third reason the Buddha did not believe in a god is because he felt that the belief was not necessary. Some claim that the belief in a god is necessary in order to explain the origin on the universe. But science has very convincingly explained how the universe came into being without having to introduce the god-idea. Some claim that belief in god is necessary to have a happy meaningful life. But again we can see that this is not so. There are millions of atheists and free-thinkers, not to mention many Buddhists, who live useful, happy and meaning- ful lives without belief in a god. Some claim that belief in god’s power is necessary because humans, being weak, do not have the strength to help themselves. Once again, the evidence indicates the opposite. One often hears of people who have overcome great disabilities and handicaps, enormous odds and difficulties, through their own inner resources, their own efforts and without belief in a god. Some claim that god is neces- sary in order to give salvation. But this argument only holds good if you accept the theological concept of salvation and Buddhists do not accept such a concept. Based on his own experience the Buddha saw that each human being has the capacity to purify the mind, develop infinite love and compassion and perfect understanding. He shifted attention from the heavens to the heart and encouraged us to find solutions to our problems through self-understanding.

Source:Good Questions, Good Answers



You are getting Hinduism confused with Buddhism.




posted on Dec, 19 2010 @ 09:43 AM
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Originally posted by Tamahu

reply to post by seeyounexttuesday
 


I like cats as well. Although when we're dealing with more than one or two cats in one house at the same time, it can be a bit too much.

Jungle,


My word, you're a very cruel man...that one had me looking for breeders...HOW gorgeous is that beast!!!!?????

I WANT ONE!


Originally posted by seeyounexttuesday
I would suggest, instead of smoking plants, that it would be much better to activate our atrophied glands (Pineal, Hypothalamus, etc.) through Yoga and Tantra practice, as to activate experiences related to '___' and other Mystical experiences. In the Gnostic tradition, it is taught that the Elemental Intelligences of plants can work for us without us having to smoke them. Smoke damages the lungs, and disrupts the flow of Vayu and Prana in our bodies.


I haven't taken '___' and have no immediate plans to do so, but it is something I am working towards in the future. I haven't got my questions finalised and I think it will be a fair few years before I am in a place where I will. I am in no hurry though, I suspect that I will know when I am ready. I know that there are less debilitating ways and means, such as meditation, and Yoga, which I do on occasion practice, mainly for breathing control, but I am not an ascetic in that sense and plant gnosis is far more helpful to me, personally, in one form or another.


Originally posted by Tamahu
Are you at all familiar with Blue Lotus and/or Blue Lily?


Yes, but only recently, other than from a purely horticultural point of view, esoterically, I only recently realised it's significance when I went to the exhibition of the Book of the Dead at the British Museum, and have been looking into it since. I am sourcing some seeds so that I can grow one or two in my garden. I am wondering if the Blue Lotus can be equated with the Lady of the Lake from Arthurian legends...it would make sense I think... either way, as far as ethnobotanicals is concerned it is interesting, Alkaloid rich, which would make it suitable to mix with Rue...however, most telling is that the derivative, or refined form of Aporphine, Apomorphine, stains green...and isn't Osiris, or one of the Egyptian after life gods, depicted as Green? I think there is a very good chance that this plant was used in ritual deaths, as opposed to actual deaths and burials, in the Shamanistic tradition.


Originally posted by Tamahu
Interesting. Some have implied that the Matriarchal Mother Goddess Tantra traditions of the Dravidians, and other cultures, were usurped by the Patriarchal Vedic, Brahmin, and Hebrew cultures. However, I wouldn't say that Matriarchal and Patriarchal cultures are necessarily any better than one another. It's just that there are cycles where one dominates more than the other.


I had to look up Dravidians, I'm afraid the Eastern traditions are not my forte, interesting though, thank you. I agree with the cycles, since civilisation began that is. Certainly in the Greek tradition you can see a clear distinction when the tribes began practcing agriculture, which was initially very much led by the women, by day, and the men became more ruled by the moon as they hunted by night and were somewhat excluded from those practices associated with plant gnosis until it was necessary, due to threats from 'unsettled' nomadic tribespeople and the need for the 'might' of men to protect the settlement. Which changed the power structure from knowledge based to 'force' or the physical strength needed to protect the settlement, and then as cultures became more commodity based, it wasn't long before women became a commodity that could be traded, and exchanged for various reasons including peace making. Although, men weren't immune to that either as time went on.

I bought a book the other week about 'grave goods', and there was a picture (annoyingly uncredited), that is clearly in the Babylonian tradition, perhaps even Sumerian, of what looks very much to be Dionysus, except that he is carrying, as well as the vine this time, a bushel of wheat. It is the only such depiction of him that I have found, he is also wearing a 'Liberty cap' and has goats horns. Kind of turned much of my thinking on my head...but can't find anything like it anywhere else to confirm one way or another...he is also very much a male, no hint of androgeny...it made my jaw drop, literally, when I saw it.


Originally posted by Tamahu
Although the current prominence of the Patriarchal forces that we have seen dominating the planet for the last few thousand years, would be due to a much larger cycle than the ones of 42 + 42 years that are described in the above linked-post.

The two would have been more balanced during the Golden, Silver, and Copper Ages:


"Thus, for several thousand years after the wars of the Maha-barat ceased by the union of the Linga and Ioni, until the Christian æra, whence the system began to be lost, we hear of scarcely any religious wars."

- Godfrey Higgins




Can you explain to me a little more what you mean by this? I'm sorry but I don't think I understand.

Sorry to have taken so long to reply to this...busy time...disorganised mind to boot.
I hope I haven't exhausted your patience.



posted on Dec, 19 2010 @ 04:35 PM
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reply to post by KilgoreTrout
 


Originally posted by KilgoreTrout
Sorry to have taken so long to reply to this...busy time...disorganised mind to boot.
I hope I haven't exhausted your patience.



You haven't at all.


And I know how that goes. So I'll plan on replying within the next few days or so, if not much sooner.




edit on 19-12-2010 by Tamahu because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2010 @ 05:10 PM
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Originally posted by Tamahu
You haven't at all.


And I know how that goes. So I'll plan on replying within the next few days or so, if not much sooner.


No more mention of those lovely furry creatures mind or I shall cry...if I don't end up rushing out to the RSPCA first thing tomorrow that is....



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 01:42 AM
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Originally posted by KilgoreTrout
My word, you're a very cruel man...that one had me looking for breeders...HOW gorgeous is that beast!!!!?????

I WANT ONE!



That web page use to have all the pictures of their Jungle Cat on one page, but now we have to scroll through them. Did you happen to see all the pics? I'm not too much of a cat person, but I certainly wouldn't mind having a exotic thirty or forty pound cat for a pet. Either a big cat like some of the ones I listed earlier, or a wolf hybrid dog.




Originally posted by KilgoreTrout
Yes, but only recently, other than from a purely horticultural point of view, esoterically, I only recently realised it's significance when I went to the exhibition of the Book of the Dead at the British Museum, and have been looking into it since. I am sourcing some seeds so that I can grow one or two in my garden. I am wondering if the Blue Lotus can be equated with the Lady of the Lake from Arthurian legends...it would make sense I think... either way, as far as ethnobotanicals is concerned it is interesting, Alkaloid rich, which would make it suitable to mix with Rue...however, most telling is that the derivative, or refined form of Aporphine, Apomorphine, stains green...and isn't Osiris, or one of the Egyptian after life gods, depicted as Green? I think there is a very good chance that this plant was used in ritual deaths, as opposed to actual deaths and burials, in the Shamanistic tradition.



Some or even all of what you've said here could be related to valid levels of symbolism, although I'm not sure.

I found this a while ago:

Blue Lotus Attar

Blue Lotus Oil (absolute) - per ml: Thailand/India (Nymphaea caerulea)

But I haven't bought any yet. And I'm not sure what the difference is between Blue Lotus and Blue Lily, although I used to know. I think. I'll have to look into it again soon.

Are seeds of either, not easy to come by?

The Lotus in general is mainly a Feminine symbol though.

About the Lady of the Lake from a Kabbalistic perspective:




"What we understand is that the legend of King Arthur is Initiatic. King Arthur is the Spirit (Chesed) and in order to attain that title, He drew the sword (of the Kundalini) from the Anvil (representing the work in Sexual Alchemy: the Forge of the Cyclops). The great King always listens to the advice of His Magician, Merlin (Kether: the Ancient of Days). It is through Merlin that He obtains the sacred sword Excalibur (also a symbol of the Kundalini) from the Lady of the Lake (the Divine Mother). Meanwhile, Lancelot is His Knight (Tiphereth) and Guinevere is His Queen (Divine Soul). So long live King Arthur! Long live His Queen, His Twelve Knights (of the Inner Zodiac), and His Kingdom (of the Celestial Jerusalem)!"





Originally posted by KilgoreTrout
I had to look up Dravidians, I'm afraid the Eastern traditions are not my forte, interesting though, thank you. I agree with the cycles, since civilisation began that is. Certainly in the Greek tradition...


...I bought a book the other week about 'grave goods', and there was a picture (annoyingly uncredited), that is clearly in the Babylonian tradition, perhaps even Sumerian, of what looks very much to be Dionysus, except that he is carrying, as well as the vine this time, a bushel of wheat. It is the only such depiction of him that I have found, he is also wearing a 'Liberty cap' and has goats horns. Kind of turned much of my thinking on my head...but can't find anything like it anywhere else to confirm one way or another...he is also very much a male, no hint of androgeny...it made my jaw drop, literally, when I saw it.



It seems that many of the Gods are depicted at times with the Horns of Moses (such as the Herukas of Buddhism), which symbolize an Awakened Kundalini. The opposite would be the horns of Satan (the ego) which symbolize an awakened Satan's Tail (the Kundabuffer).

And there's A LOT that I want to know about the Root Races in relation to the Khemetians, Dravidians, Sumerians, Elamites, Pelasgi, Thracians, Phrygians, Cabiri, Orpheus, Dionysus, Sanchoniathon, etc.

Anyhow, in regard to the following link, I'm no fan of David Icke's writings; however this is an interesting thread:

Liberty Cap

(Even though there must be legitimate Elemental Magic for various Mushrooms, I think that some people assign to Mushrooms way too much significance)

According to H.P. Blavatsky, Samael Aun Weor, and others; the Dugpas or Drukpas are of the Black Lodge, because they practice Black Tantra (which is how the Kundabuffer is awakened).

However, according to Samael Aun Weor as well, the Bonpo School is of the White Lodge 'even when they use red caps'; because the Bons practice White Tantra (which is how the Kundalini is awakened).




"Thus, for several thousand years after the wars of the Maha-barat ceased by the union of the Linga and Ioni, until the Christian æra, whence the system began to be lost, we hear of scarcely any religious wars." - Godfrey Higgins




Originally posted by KilgoreTrout
Can you explain to me a little more what you mean by this?



One theory about the Mahabarata (which if I'm not mistaken is said to have occurred around or before 3500 B.C., which would have been around or before the beginning of the Kali Yuga), is that 'Vedic Caucasians' came from the North to the Indus-Kush and other parts of India to conquer the often Matriarchal dark-skinned Dravidians, Tamils, etc. (who practiced the Tantra that the Upanishads are based on). Meaning that this great war or Mahabarata was possibly a literal physical war. Now I don't know if this is the case or not (though it's interesting that the word "Caucasian" is derived from the Caucasus Mountains). And whether it is or not, the Mahabarata (see the Bhagavad Gita) still has a lot within it that symbolizes principles that are much beyond just the physical.

The Linga is the Phallus (the Magician's Wand or Sword), and the Ioni is the Vagina (the Magicians Bell/Cup); directly related to the Great Arcanum (the Magician's Sword or Wand being the Spinal Column). I'm not sure if Godfrey Higgins was fully aware of the Great Arcanum or not. But H.P. Blavatsky and Manly P. Hall 33º were aware of it, and they both referred to Godfrey Higgins' writings at times.




edit on 20-12-2010 by Tamahu because: edited



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 02:00 AM
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from my previous practice in buddhism, i whittled it down to the following. which, by stating, i contradict it. but hey, thats the fun part


"In the world. I see this generation
Racked by craving for being,
Wretched men gibbering in the face of Death,
Still craving, hoping for some kind of being.
See how they tremble
Over what they claim as 'mine,'
Like fishes in the puddles of a failing stream"

"Do not believe others beliefs,
Do not believe your own beliefs,
Do not believe belief itself"

As with everything, its easy to get caught up with the lights and sparkling items, beware the trappings of the mind. best of luck, friend, what you are looking for is already there.

-with love



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 02:11 AM
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It is to be in the spirit with mankind.



posted on Dec, 20 2010 @ 10:48 AM
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Ahhh, all the wonderful honey of insight to be drunk from this thread.
It's worth stopping drinking drinking the nectar long enough to read it all.

I too would love a fishing cat, Kilgore, old friend. But it seems one must continually provide fresh animals for them to kill, which I couldn't bear, and they only live 10 years in captivity.
My 13 year old long'n strong tom is curled up beside me, a soft furry cushion, peeping out at me from under his paw. He thinks he's still a kitten.



Now, after all the spiritual insights, a practical take on Buddhism.

Ajan was a Buddhist monk, with 10 students to teach. One day he decided they had prepared well enough to each be given their mantra. First he explained the sacredness off these words, promising that, by constant repitition of the mantra, they would eventually reach nirvana. He underlined the importance of holding these words secret, telling the students if they ever said their personal mantra to another, they would be cast into a bleak and frozen hell. The class dunce, Rhajan, spoke up and asked what would happen to the people who heard the student telling his mantra. Ajan told him the people hearing would instantly become enlightened, but the student would not reach enlightenment after that until he had lived as many lives as there are leaves on the monastery's ancient Bodhi tree.

That afternoon the students had to buy groceries for the monastery. At the market, the other students stared, aghast, as silly Rhajan tore through the market, shouting about a jewel within a lotus.

On returning, they barged up the stairs to tell Ajan what a terrible thing Rhajan had done.

Ajan called Rhajan in, sat him down and asked what he was doing.
"I was being Buddha," he said, as the open-mouthed students reeled at his conceit.
"What do you mean, being Buddha?" asked Ajan.
"Buddha turned his back on nirvana for a time, in order to help those still tied to the wheel to become enlightened. Lacking in abilities as I am, isn't it better that I forget about my future and bring enlightenment to so many others?"
"But have you considered your fate? I've told you, as many lives as there are leaves on our Bodhi tree you shall spend in ignorance stumbling blind in the darkness, before you have this opportunity again."
Yes Ajan, but that will not be forever. One day I will receive the teachings again, as we have been promised Buddha will not rest until all have reached Nirvana."

Ajan turned to his other students, saying, "here in the one who truly understands the meaning of Buddhism. He will be your teacher now, as it is time for me to leave."

A storm had been brewing, with the winds battering at the monastery walls. The students cowered at the thunder, and the shaking, but Ajan sat calmly, continuing to teach as the wall behind him clattered down, one huge piece of rock crushing him.

To their astonishment Rhajan continued the teacher's story, explaining its meaning.

Later, cleaning up the damage, they discovered the storm had blown all the leaves off the Bodhi tree.




edit on 20/12/10 by Kailassa because: repairing the bodhi



posted on Dec, 22 2010 @ 04:06 PM
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Originally posted by Tamahu
That web page use to have all the pictures of their Jungle Cat on one page, but now we have to scroll through them. Did you happen to see all the pics? I'm not too much of a cat person, but I certainly wouldn't mind having a exotic thirty or forty pound cat for a pet. Either a big cat like some of the ones I listed earlier, or a wolf hybrid dog.


I did scroll all the way down, and though I saw the 'fresh kills', until my friend Kailassa pointed them out, I had rather naively failed to realise the implications. I don't think I will be getting one of those, I'm far too much of a girl I am afraid...unless it'd settle for me running around with a can of cat food attached to a string...that's the problem with cats though, they tend to be too clever for such tricks...it might humour me for a while and then scratch me to ribbons if I didn't bring back a Koi or two for it to savage...expensive as well...not that easy to get hold of live fish in these here parts...

I'm not really a dog person, nothing against them, but I have only ever loved one dog (a terrier-cross called Peppy, long gone now), and dogs need constant companionship, I'm so good at that...bit of a lone hunter myself.


Originally posted by Tamahu
Some or even all of what you've said here could be related to valid levels of symbolism, although I'm not sure.

I found this a while ago:

Blue Lotus Attar

Blue Lotus Oil (absolute) - per ml: Thailand/India (Nymphaea caerulea)

But I haven't bought any yet. And I'm not sure what the difference is between Blue Lotus and Blue Lily, although I used to know. I think. I'll have to look into it again soon.

Are seeds of either, not easy to come by?


I haven't been able to find any in the UK, probably because it isn't really the climate for them, but I have found somewhere in the States that ships internationally...but I need to think about the realism of the climate issue before I put my hand in the pocket. Wondering how feasible it is to overwinter indoors...it is very beautiful and seemingly very lucrative, the dried petals alone are expensive...but if I even attempt to grow it for financial gain, it will undoubtably fail, I am a money repellent.


Originally posted by Tamahu
The Lotus in general is mainly a Feminine symbol though.


It appears so...certainly in the papyrus at the exhibition, it was carried or worn only by the women depicted, although, in modern medicine it seems to have value in treating erectile dysfunction...which I suppose could indicate what 'use' it had as an aphrodisiac in more ancient times, so while associated with the feminine, it served to 'enhance' the masculine...which is, after all, the way it should be.


Originally posted by Tamahu

About the Lady of the Lake from a Kabbalistic perspective:


"What we understand is that the legend of King Arthur is Initiatic. King Arthur is the Spirit (Chesed) and in order to attain that title, He drew the sword (of the Kundalini) from the Anvil (representing the work in Sexual Alchemy: the Forge of the Cyclops). The great King always listens to the advice of His Magician, Merlin (Kether: the Ancient of Days). It is through Merlin that He obtains the sacred sword Excalibur (also a symbol of the Kundalini) from the Lady of the Lake (the Divine Mother). Meanwhile, Lancelot is His Knight (Tiphereth) and Guinevere is His Queen (Divine Soul). So long live King Arthur! Long live His Queen, His Twelve Knights (of the Inner Zodiac), and His Kingdom (of the Celestial Jerusalem)!"


I am most taken with the way when the Blue Lotus flowers, it stretches itself up, way up above the water, much further than most lilies...it seemed to me a common sense association...I suppose we see what we want to see and find the associations that we are conditioned to see...

Do you know the Passion Flower? Like Rue, it contains Harmaline, which Alexander Shulgin confirmed, produces hallucinations of 'spotted cats'.



The pointed tips of the leaves were taken to represent the Holy Lance.

The tendrils represent the whips used in the flagellation of Christ.

The ten petals and sepals represent the ten faithful apostles (less St. Peter the denier and Judas Iscariot the betrayer).

The flower's radial filaments, which can number more than a hundred and vary from flower to flower, represent the crown of thorns.

The chalice-shaped ovary with its receptacle represents a hammer or the Holy Grail

The 3 stigmas represent the 3 nails and the 5 anthers below them the 5 wounds (four by the nails and one by the lance).

The blue and white colors of many species' flowers represent Heaven and Purity.


en.wikipedia.org...


Originally posted by Tamahu
It seems that many of the Gods are depicted at times with the Horns of Moses (such as the Herukas of Buddhism), which symbolize an Awakened Kundalini. The opposite would be the horns of Satan (the ego) which symbolize an awakened Satan's Tail (the Kundabuffer).


Well I am not sure it would be opposite, not in the case of Dionysus anyway...he is after all 'of Zeus' and Zeus is 'earth' or matter or the ground which we grow in...hence the symbology of fruit...Dionysus being the fruit of the earth. I looked at the picture again, could they be Bull's horns I wonder? It might make better sense. Or perhaps, a Buck...hmm?


Originally posted by Tamahu
And there's A LOT that I want to know about the Root Races in relation to the Khemetians, Dravidians, Sumerians, Elamites, Pelasgi, Thracians, Phrygians, Cabiri, Orpheus, Dionysus, Sanchoniathon, etc.


I will check out the thread you link to...but since I don't agree with the notion of races...there is a very good book by Stephen Mithen called 'After the Ice'...secular, but most helpful in understanding the divisions between peoples...I think it was emsed1, in another thread, who said about people going around and coming back again to meet up...well the Ice Age kept some peoples from meeting up for thousands of years...things can change a lot in that time...


Originally posted by Tamahu
Anyhow, in regard to the following link, I'm no fan of David Icke's writings; however this is an interesting thread:

Liberty Cap

(Even though there must be legitimate Elemental Magic for various Mushrooms, I think that some people assign to Mushrooms way too much significance)


Please don't say that in my brother's hearing, he would give up on humanity altogether, he's hanging by a thread in his misanthropy as it is. He has spoken with the Mushroom God numerous times and accepts no others. His love of mushrooms knows few bounds.


Originally posted by Tamahu
According to H.P. Blavatsky, Samael Aun Weor, and others; the Dugpas or Drukpas are of the Black Lodge, because they practice Black Tantra (which is how the Kundabuffer is awakened).

However, according to Samael Aun Weor as well, the Bonpo School is of the White Lodge 'even when they use red caps'; because the Bons practice White Tantra (which is how the Kundalini is awakened).


I incidently didn't make it to the book shop, this christmas business keeps getting in the way...bah hum bug...soon as my son is old enough I am abstaining from the whole business...but interesting about the red caps...have you heard of R Gordon Wasson? He did an exhaustive study of the use of the Amanita Muscaria in Russian Shamanism, he didn't want the likes of us to know about it, easily though, elitist JP Morgan banker that he was...and only had a limited publication, a copy for all the major libraries, and only few more...it is very difficult to get hold of...but if you can very well worth the read. However, when my brother went to China, mushroom foraging of course, he could find no indication of psychotropic mushroom use, traditionally...I will tell him about the Bonpo red hats though...see what he thinks...may indicate a redundant use...and of course it would also indicate that the spread of humans was north to south, because of course the Amanita Muscaria isn't indigenous to China...from what he said. I will talk to him. But thanks for that, a different perspective is often what is required to see the wood for the trees.


Originally posted by Tamahu
One theory about the Mahabarata (which if I'm not mistaken is said to have occurred around or before 3500 B.C., which would have been around or before the beginning of the Kali Yuga), is that 'Vedic Caucasians' came from the North to the Indus-Kush and other parts of India to conquer the often Matriarchal dark-skinned Dravidians, Tamils, etc. (who practiced the Tantra that the Upanishads are based on). Meaning that this great war or Mahabarata was possibly a literal physical war. Now I don't know if this is the case or not (though it's interesting that the word "Caucasian" is derived from the Caucasus Mountains). And whether it is or not, the Mahabarata (see the Bhagavad Gita) still has a lot within it that symbolizes principles that are much beyond just the physical.


I have a book, 'The Atlas of the Ancient World', in it there is a very straight forward map that illustrates the 'barriers' that our ancient ancestors would have faced. Mountains, rivers that cannot be crossed in certain places by people of foot, etc...though each obstacle was eventually overcome, initially, as nomadic hunter gatherers, they would have been avoided...considered dangerous or taboo (same thing really, superstition invariably emerges from fear)...from it, you get a clearer idea of the paths that could be taken by those first frontiers men and that when you superimpose that on the civilisations that first emerged, that the paths, invariably followed rivers...water was everything, still is.

I shall have to get hold of the Bhagavad Gita also.


Originally posted by Tamahu
The Linga is the Phallus (the Magician's Wand or Sword), and the Ioni is the Vagina (the Magicians Bell/Cup); directly related to the Great Arcanum (the Magician's Sword or Wand being the Spinal Column). I'm not sure if Godfrey Higgins was fully aware of the Great Arcanum or not. But H.P. Blavatsky and Manly P. Hall 33º were aware of it, and they both referred to Godfrey Higgins' writings at times.


So the Holy Grail would be the Vagina/Chalice that gave birth to Christ then? Or am I misunderstanding you?

edit on 22-12-2010 by KilgoreTrout because: Because I AM a moron and very tired...

edit on 22-12-2010 by KilgoreTrout because: I mean really!!! I wish I was 'on something'...then at least I'd have an excuse...Bed!



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