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U.S. Atheists Reportedly Using Hair Dryers to 'De-Baptize'

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posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 08:47 AM
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U.S. Atheists Reportedly Using Hair Dryers to 'De-Baptize'


www.foxnews.com

American atheists lined up to be "de-baptized" in a ritual using a hair dryer, according to a report Friday on U.S. late-night news program "Nightline."

Leading atheist Edwin Kagin blasted his fellow non-believers with the hair dryer to symbolically dry up the holy water sprinkled on their heads in days past. The styling tool was emblazoned with a label reading "Reason and Truth."

Kagin believes parents are wrong to baptize their children before they are able to make their own choices, eve
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 08:47 AM
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While I totally support their right to be atheists, I think they are wrong to make a joke of it. Two wrongs don't make a right. I am not religious myself but for those who want to be, they should have every right to do so, just as atheists should. I also believe that parents should have every right to baptize their children, if they see fit to do so. If you are an atheist, then being baptized as a child shouldn't bother them, as they don't believe in the first place.

With that being said, I do however find their de-baptizing efforts to be hilarious. I just don't think that they are going about it in the right way, a way in which better acceptance will be afforded to their movement. You should pick your battles and remember that the world isn't fair.

--airspoon


www.foxnews.com
(visit the link for the full news article)


+47 more 
posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 08:52 AM
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Why would it be wrong to symbolicly de-baptize adults when it is ok to symbolicly baptize babies ?


+4 more 
posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 08:53 AM
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Think this was already posted, but yes, I agree. It's never a good idea to attempt to humiliate someone for their beliefs. But I guess this is just another indication of the overall lack of respect in general that's become a trend not only in the U.S. but in the world.

Maybe this is because the people who get the "press" seem to be the ones who do outrageous things and make outrageous statements, and so others look to this as leadership or a way to get the attention.

Just because you have the right to say or do something doesn't mean you always have to say it. People are losing their boundaries in general. All this kind of behavior does is belittle everyone involved. People who are true to their moral center and solid in their beliefs are rarely the ones doing things like this.



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 09:04 AM
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reply to post by Rafe_
 


I don't think that they should be prevented from doing this, just that they should be more wise in doing so, especially if they are trying to gain acceptance for their non-beliefs.

If athiests don't believe in god, then why should it matter to them whether they are baptized or not? Really, the only purpose it serves, is to throw dirt into the face of those who do believe in baptizing.

--airspoon


+4 more 
posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 09:12 AM
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Reply to post by ~Lucidity
 


How does a "de-baptizing" ritual humiliate those who believe in a baptizing ritual?

Unless of course you're some over-sensitive emotional zealot or suffering from a developmental disorder I fail to see how what one group of people does can cause another group to feel humiliated in what they do.

Especially where "faith" is concerned. There is essentially nothing to mock in faith and simultaneously everything to mock at once since it is void of any tangible qualities. Whether one would feel humiliated or not is entirely subjective. I would have to believe that those of faith who are sincere in their faith would have a hard time concerning themselves with the actions of others.

I would even go sonar as to say that the relative perception of seriousness of baptism versus the relative ridiculous perception of the de-baptism could be used to convince those of "faith"'or considering "faith" that their conclusions have more merit.

Being ridiculed or the perception of being ridiculed is almost an automatic invitation to the "high ground".

But I'm sure some nut will run his mouth on homosexuals or how Obama is a Muslim and that "high ground" will be lost rather quickly.

In any case, I fail to see how this would be humiliating to the beliefs of others. If anything adopting a goofy ritual or even anti-ritual should be humiliating tonhe adopters of said ritual. As in don't they have anything better to do with their time?


 
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posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 09:13 AM
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reply to post by thisguyrighthere
 


They're making fun of people who believe. Are you trying to imply that atheists have rituals?



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 09:15 AM
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This is awesome. Now, symbolically, those baptized as kids can make their own choice to un-baptize symbolically.
I Just think this is great, all around.

Plus it's funny for the rest of us. The reaction of the religious are always welcomed.



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 09:17 AM
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Originally posted by ~Lucidity
But I guess this is just another indication of the overall lack of respect in general that's become a trend not only in the U.S. but in the world.

Just because you have the right to say or do something doesn't mean you always have to say it.

People are losing their boundaries in general.

People who are true to their moral center and solid in their beliefs are rarely the ones doing things like this.


Absofrigginglutely! Unfortunately, those involved in these types of "debates" (using the term loosely) are more consumed with being "right", than being truthful.

I started a thread on the lack of respect, sometime back, and it received little attention.

I think your post is a very accurate observation of the atheist/deist arguments. In reality, one affects the other as much as a Cowboys fan affects a Steelers fan...Not at all, unless you allow it.

Edit to add: After typing the above, I had a thought. Maybe those who might be offended by the theatrics should consider that there is more symbolism than the actors intended. The hot air of the hair dryers may be symbolic of the "fires of hell".

[edit on 18-7-2010 by WTFover]



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 09:20 AM
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Originally posted by ~Lucidity
Think this was already posted, but yes, I agree. It's never a good idea to attempt to humiliate someone for their beliefs. But I guess this is just another indication of the overall lack of respect in general that's become a trend not only in the U.S. but in the world.


With such a stance one must ask themselves where people's respect is for atheists....

I don't really see this as humiliating anyone's beliefs. People love ceremonies celebrating their beliefs (which is basically what a baptism is), so why not have a ceremony for those who have shuffled off those beliefs? A hair dryer, though silly, seems appropriate for those coming out of christianity.

Ultimately, I don't view this as anything more than a publicity stunt. If TV stations picked up the story it was simply to exploit those rabid christians who get up in arms anytime an atheist story appears anywhere and thereby generate viewership.



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 09:23 AM
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reply to post by traditionaldrummer
 

Again, to expand, people who are true to their moral center and solid in their beliefs are rarely the ones either doing things like this or affected by things like this. Are there some who disrespect atheists? Sure. I didn't really discriminate between the two "warring factions" here...this applies to all "sides."

 

reply to post by WTFover
 

Thanks for the heads up on your thread about respect. Will check that out.




[edit on 7/18/2010 by ~Lucidity]



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 09:28 AM
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I expect atheists to have enough common courtesy and understanding to safeguard me from religious and atheist zealots. It's one thing to believe, to study, to discuss, and quite another when that belief is translated into forcing people under duress or via social pressure and ridicule, to assimilate. I expect atheists to have learned enough of the lesson to not propagate it against everyone who isn't an atheist. Last thing we need is more zealots.



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 09:30 AM
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Originally posted by ~Lucidity
Again, to expand, people who are true to their moral center and solid in their beliefs are rarely the ones either doing things like this or affected by things like this.


I'm not so sure about that. Such people are often the ones causing problems.

I don't understand why people would be distressed that atheists has a faux ceremony celebrating their beliefs.... just because FOX News ran yet another hit piece on them.



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 09:32 AM
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Well, obviously they were just trying to make controversy and piss off christians, and the press covered it so it worked. To me, hardcore atheists like that are the same as hardcore christians, both are always pushin their beliefs on other people, both are annoying. I think the irony of how similar they are is hilarious though



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 09:33 AM
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reply to post by airspoon
 
Thank you for a good laugh, this is great.
S&F for you.



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 09:34 AM
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These baptizers also lop off the end of your we we,
with out asking
Having been there as a child I find genitle mutilation
to be a MAJOR invasion of privacy.
Which if they would have asked me before hand
would have had me reaching for a pall peen hammer
to answer them with...

[edit on 18-7-2010 by Danbones]

[edit on 18-7-2010 by Danbones]



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 09:35 AM
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Originally posted by traditionaldrummer
I don't really see this as humiliating anyone's beliefs. People love ceremonies celebrating their beliefs (which is basically what a baptism is), so why not have a ceremony for those who have shuffled off those beliefs?


Whether it humiliating or not, that was the obvious intention, re-enforced by your viewing it as a "publicity stunt". The difference I see in the "de-baptism" and a "baptism" is the latter is done only in the presence of like minded people.


Ultimately, I don't view this as anything more than a publicity stunt. If TV stations picked up the story it was simply to exploit those rabid christians who get up in arms anytime an atheist story appears anywhere and thereby generate viewership.


Wouldn't you think that Nightline received an invitation to cover the event?



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 09:44 AM
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Originally posted by WTFover
Whether it humiliating or not, that was the obvious intention, re-enforced by your viewing it as a "publicity stunt". The difference I see in the "de-baptism" and a "baptism" is the latter is done only in the presence of like minded people.


No, each ceremony is performed by like-minded people. I still don't see an intentional motive to humiliate christians. Christians, like any other religious people, lose their mind at anything which may contradict their beliefs, including those who rejected their religion and openly celebrate it.

Nightline and FOX and everyone else ran the story to exploit such people so they'd watch the advertisements on their networks and websites.

As far as this business of respect goes, why does religion deserve it? Religions that actively discriminate against homosexuals, deny science which is contradictory to their religion, actively subjugate women, attempt to force their teachings and rituals in schools, etc. ... this deserves respect? We look the other way on this but lose our minds over atheists with hair dryers?



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 09:48 AM
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Originally posted by Danbones
These baptizers also lop off the end of your we we,
with out asking
Having been there as a child I find genitle mutilation
to be a MAJOR invasion of privacy.
Which if they would have asked me before hand
would have had me reaching for a pall peen hammer
to answer them with...

[edit on 18-7-2010 by Danbones]

[edit on 18-7-2010 by Danbones]


I agree and think that circumcision is completely wrong, no "ifs", "ands" or "buts" about it. I have always been against circumcision as it is a gender oriented sexual-mutilation. We have outlawed the same kind of mutilation for girls and look down upon it in disgust, though somehow it is okay to do it to boys.

With that being said, circumcision is not usually a Christian practice. The practice is usually reserved for Jews and Muslims, though in America and Canada, Christians do it too.

I come from a Jewish family, yet have opted out of mutilating my son. If he feels that he wants to mutilate his own penis, then he is more than free to do so, only after he is an adult and can make an informed decision.

--airspoon


+10 more 
posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 09:48 AM
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Atheists like taking something that is sacred and special to others and desecrating it. Pissing on the church lawn, spraying graffitti on religious statues, putting a quran into a toilet, turning baptism into a joke - whatever can be done to belittle others beliefs, their infantile minds are willing.

Im not religious at all but I have the greatest respect toward people practicing their Religion and wouldnt dare mock their rituals.



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