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ALERT - is lava now on the sea floor in the Gulf?

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posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 10:59 PM
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reply to post by Under Water
 


I was watching rov 1 & 2. I didn't see anything unusual just red undersea plants.

I swear it felt rov 1 was a loop though.




posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 11:03 PM
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You don't see what looks like fire behind the large clouds of oil and methane???



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 11:05 PM
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reply to post by spy66
 


SPY66 you have been on this thread all day saying "Its resting on the concrete block" there is no concrete block down there. We watched it stop and just rest on the bottom, yet all day you have been saying NO LAVA etc etc.

I have to respectfully ask, what makes you sit here and try and convince everyone that the ROV is doing something we all know it is not, if you do not work for BP?



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 11:06 PM
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reply to post by Under Water
 

You do know they are using extremely bright illumination that makes the oil, which is red, look like its glowing or on fire? You are just seeing the oil with backlighting.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 11:15 PM
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Originally posted by Archirvion
Of course its lava. After reading the 48 page long BP internal document ,it looks like its a banolith straight below the drilling point. So yes some lave will come out.


That's Batholith which is solid granite usually. There is no magma?

A Batholith is made up of Plutonic Rocks formed from COOLED Magma. It is made up of rock like Granite, Quartz or Diorite.

That area is Geologically stable. The whole concept of Magma is ludicrous. There are miles of Granite between that well and the Mohorovicic discontinuity and upper Mantle which is in a plastic state.

Does anyone here actually believe they would drill into a pool of Magma?



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 11:19 PM
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I saw what the OP was talking about briefly, the little rift on the right side of the white tube had a reddened luminescense to it and what looked to be heat ripples comming from the spot. It did look like lava briefly but it's gone now. He's not talking about the orange globs floating by, that's oil or debris of some sort and I may be wrong but from what I saw, I'm pretty sure it wasn't a light or laser spot either. Alot of folks must have missed it here but it did look like lava for a while there and even turned violet as it 'cooled'/dimmed like a fading infrared source often will on a video camera.
From the OP's post...



That's pretty close to what I saw complete with heat ripples and variances in intensity and location in that 'rift'.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 11:35 PM
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You know, they just zoomed the cameras into that exact spot where you thought you saw lava on the floor. They also moved the other camera so now i can't keep watching what i saw earlier.... so i'm off to bed now.



posted on Jun, 20 2010 @ 11:50 PM
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Originally posted by Blaine91555
That area is Geologically stable. The whole concept of Magma is ludicrous. There are miles of Granite between that well and the Mohorovicic discontinuity and upper Mantle which is in a plastic state.

Does anyone here actually believe they would drill into a pool of Magma?


Area is geologically stable huh? Concept of Magma is ludicrous? 'Drill into magma', what kind of straw are you trying stuff into this thread? Nobody said anything about drilling into magma. Talk about ludicrous Blaine, come on now. You google Mohorovic and throw it around with some authority, but you don't seem to understand that the geolgy of the reigon in question here is FAR from geologically stable, and yes, magma...
www.marum.de...
www.springerlink.com...
en.wikipedia.org...
adsabs.harvard.edu...
www.timesonline.co.uk...
htmlimg3.scribdassets.com...

No the area isn't stable, the last major activity along the New Madrid Fault which joins the Mid-Atlantic Ridge in the early 1800's was serious and said to have even caused the Missisippi to flow backwards and has had recent activity.
No the idea of magma isn't ludricous, the idea is frightening, they didn't drill into magma
they drilled into a pocket of immense pressure caused by magma. Go shake a Coke bottle up and drill a pin prick hole in the top of it, did you drill into Coke? No? Why is it still all over you then?
If you're going to go around debunking this site, that's all well and good, it builds character, but do yourself a favor and try to learn a little about the topic before you besmirch it.



posted on Jun, 21 2010 @ 12:40 AM
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I am watching the Multiple feeds and Rov 2 Skandi is down at the moment.link to the Multi feeds save in yer favorites, heck make a folder called oil, I did.



posted on Jun, 21 2010 @ 12:49 AM
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Unless it can be confirmed that is not magma the fracturing has likely reached an actively forming laccolith ( if unfamiliar with the term en.wikipedia.org...)with still flowing magma, or is causing one to form near the surface. Not at all impossible given the general complex geological features of the area. It also is the logical reason for the pressure and blow out since it is now been released this well has been fracked since february
And to the poster who is tossing the "Moho" about, consider the possibility it is a global cushion of hydrocarbons( abiotic oil) that is the torque converter between the crust and the mantle.Note "between crust and mantle" not well into the crust at the level this problem is occurring even IF vulcanism is involved. You are aware that there is a lot of molten rock in the crustal area in actively volcanic areas, right? You are aware the gulf floor is riddled with mud and asphalt 'volcanoes'?
At any rate at this point a thick laccolithic flow could well stifle some oil/gas flow or cause a steam eruption, both /neither who knows but that it is a not unlikely event at this point.
Given this well has been fracked since february it changes things much for the worse in the near future as the deterioration has been going on longer than the speculation, which so far has been the closest thing we have to a hard fact about the state of the geology of the well area. It is known "they" are doing a lot of "imaging" of the strata and likely have been since shortly after the well fracked.
And to all who would call "doom and gloom", think rather of ominous facts, it will give you a greater grasp of the reality of what this gusher means not necessarily to the planet, but definately what it will mean to ours and many other species presently enjoying the formerly fairly non-toxic planetary conditions.
N.



posted on Jun, 21 2010 @ 01:14 AM
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I was poking around the other day and ran into some studies that showed that localized low pressure atmospheric conditions, storms and fronts, can cause a signifigant increase in methane gas release from area like swamps and wetlands. That got me to rethink the whole methane situation in the Gulf, a hurricane is an extreme low pressure area and with the release of all this methane and what's already down there (read me), it seems to me that it could trigger a massive release.
Sounds irrelevant to the OP and I really hope it is because if we've busted into a massive deposit of methane hydrates and now have magma flowing close to the surface as the pressure from the well equalizes, could it not feasibly and exponentially accelerate the 'sublimation' of these hydrates?
Methane is bad news, on the scale the energy folks were talking prior to this disaster in the Gulf we could really be looking at a nasty scenario unfolding here.
At the risk of being repetitious, I'll post the link again...
read me, after I read that I began to wonder if maybe their mantra of "Beyond Petroleum" suggests that they knew what they were drilling into and I'd almost be willing to bet these clowns weren't drilling for oil at all but trying to get at the hydrates themselves.



posted on Jun, 21 2010 @ 01:32 AM
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Um.. that's hardly conclusive proof of lava.

Have you ever dived? If you have ever scuba dived with a good flashlight (or night dived), you'd be stunned how colorful the ocean is. See, you lose colors at different depths. By 30 feet or so, you've lost all colors. The only way to see them is with a light. The sea floor is not grays and blacks and slate colors, it's very colorful. So spotlights shined on the floor is going to reveal some natural colors.

That's all I think you are seeing. Corals and other life has plenty of color, including red. I was always surprised on deeper dives, when we took a light.. how much it would come alive with color. I don't think we are seeing out of the ordinary here.



posted on Jun, 21 2010 @ 01:41 AM
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This is this afternoon:



And this is right now



I am sure I do not need to tell you what is going on do I. If you are anywhere near the Gulf start to leave NOW!



posted on Jun, 21 2010 @ 02:03 AM
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Originally posted by harrytuttle
Actually, lava would be a GOOD THING.

It would essentially solidify once it reached the water and then it would stop the leak.


Or being how hot lava is. It would do what you said, but also release the Methane that's trapped down there.



posted on Jun, 21 2010 @ 02:05 AM
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reply to post by theregonnakillme
 


The cords and strings you see from the above post, which is anchored to the sea floor are seismic readers.



[edit on 21-6-2010 by SneakAPeek]



posted on Jun, 21 2010 @ 02:28 AM
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The Skandi ROV1 video now looks exactly like it did when they were trying the top kill. For the life of me it looks like mud and huge amounts of gas spewing out rather than the dark oil it looked like when last I checked (which was a couple of days ago).

Not good. Also, if anyone knows, are the whitish snot looking stringers on the ROV2 shots dispersant or something else?



posted on Jun, 21 2010 @ 03:08 AM
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reply to post by theregonnakillme
 


Yeah, you need to tell me. I don't understand the difference in pictures.



posted on Jun, 21 2010 @ 03:15 AM
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I'm kindof in and out as far as my ATS posting goes, but i'm seeing something on these screen shots that has me a little puzzled/uneasy...

The data in the top left, is the D: 4959.4 the depth reading? The reason I ask is because the rover seems to be getting deeper; the live feed now reads 4960.5.

I was under the impression that the robot is sitting on the sea floor. Is that normal fluctuation?



posted on Jun, 21 2010 @ 03:58 AM
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Originally posted by ManWithGrace89
I was under the impression that the robot is sitting on the sea floor. Is that normal fluctuation?


Possibly. I would assume that that depth is taken from a data reference of the ship each ROV is tethered to. Any wave or tidal activity on the surface could cause that number to change.



posted on Jun, 21 2010 @ 04:03 AM
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DAmn, i never can see the live footage from the rov. Keeps displaying the Windows loading thingy



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