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Strong Electronic Band Found in Gulf Oil. Nanotech?

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posted on May, 31 2010 @ 11:05 AM
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Originally posted by OurskiesRpoisoned


Whatever is in the oil, is highly reflective. Light sweet crude is not.



And how about light sweet crude oil in combination with seawater and whatever else there is in the gulf of mexico after a platform collapses and oil gushes out for days?

Honestly, I don't know much about the subject. But it doesn't seem so obvious to me. I haven't heard anyone notice anything unusual about the composition of the oil so far. Certainly your source does not suggest that these readings are anything out of the ordinary.





Oxidized metal in the oil (rust) would turn the oil red,


Is oil that appears red in seawater unusual? If I remember correctly than the French oil spill in the 90's was reported to look reddish to while it was still flowing in the channel.





but should not be reflective, and should not bond the oil together.



From what I remember from chemistry (like a decade ago) electrical "movement" between the part that is fully composed of oil and the part that is already mixed with water isn't anything special at all.... what makes you think that those parts do not naturally bond together without adding nanotech... Maybe when I know that I'll understand your reasoning.




posted on May, 31 2010 @ 11:43 AM
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can we rule out organic stuff like plankton? Algae?

i remember reading an article on some algae that made water look red, cant remember where.

[edit on 31-5-2010 by LurkerMan]



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by NichirasuKenshin
 


Well, it just makes sense... Oil is a mineral compound, and salt water is used as a medium for electricity (electric eels for the electric zaps, Sharks for finding food, etc), and with the amount and pressure shooting out of the pipe? Plus, you have boats, robots, and who knows what else in the water AROUND the plume ( I forgot about all that) ALSO transmitting small amounts of EM into the water....



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 02:03 PM
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Originally posted by wylekat
reply to post by NichirasuKenshin
 


Well, it just makes sense... Oil is a mineral compound, and salt water is used as a medium for electricity (electric eels for the electric zaps, Sharks for finding food, etc), and with the amount and pressure shooting out of the pipe? Plus, you have boats, robots, and who knows what else in the water AROUND the plume ( I forgot about all that) ALSO transmitting small amounts of EM into the water....



The term used is Electronic. It's an electric eel, not an electronic eel.

Electronic.



of or relating to electronics; concerned with or using devices that operate on principles governing the behavior of electrons; "electronic devices"

www.google.com...:en-US
fficial&defl=en&q=define:electronic&ei=1wcETP-jEYP68AbdjfHvDQ&sa=X&o i=glossary_definition&ct=title&ved=0CBIQkAE



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 02:38 PM
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Originally posted by OurskiesRpoisoned

Electronic Band can only mean that there is some sort of signal traveling through the oil.


Not at all. The various peaks you see and the annotations on the original chart merely explain why you see strong IR reflectivity at certain wavelengths. As you range up and down IR wavelengths, you'll hit different quantum mechanical resonances (thus the annotations O-H stretch, etc) which will cause strong reflections there.

Go google up IR spectroscopy, also microwave spectroscopy, I'm sure there are some basic descriptions out there. Looks like the wikipedia on IR spectroscopy even has some cute animations.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 02:41 PM
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Originally posted by OurskiesRpoisoned
The wavelength where the strong electronic band occurs is around .5 - 1 nm


Not at all. Read again. It's 0.5-1um (can't make a mu on here); you're off by a factor of a thousand.

Your two cites are non-sequiturs of each other, too, didn't see a need to repost them.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 02:44 PM
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Originally posted by OurskiesRpoisoned

Electronic Band can only mean that there is some sort of signal traveling through the oil.


Why?



If you have other suggestions, please feel free to share.


Well I'm pretty sure those who study this stuff all the time see nothing untoward in it. But I'm not an expert.

So, I ask you to provide evidence that your interpretation must be correct. Or are you just scare mongering?


Heavy iron could account for red color, but not the electronic band.


Or it could be the colour that was chosen to represent higher densities of oil.


I call you a flim flam man until you produce a single piece of evidence that your interpretation of this data is correct. And if you fail to do so I call this thread a HOAX!



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 02:49 PM
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Originally posted by wylekat

Ummm, the oil has some mineral content, which as it is being churned and passing thru layers of cold to warm seawater (which is an electrolyte), it is creating a static electric charge? Like dragging one's feet thru carpet, except it's the wet version?


You can't have a static charge immersed in an electrolyte, but at any rate, when they're talking about electronic bands, they're talking about quantum states of the electrons in the material. There are values they're allowed to have, and not to have, and these form "bands" of energy states that you can detect in some circumstances.

Generally, you don't see it much in an amorphous solid because the electron states are smeared all over momentum space, but in a crystal or thin film you see this more readily. Thus, the oil thin film can form electronic bands that are pronounced enough to detect by the fact that it's reflecting strongly in certain IR wavelengths and not others.

Go look at "electronic band structure" in Google, I'm sure there's some clearer explanations than mine, I understand what they're talking about but it's hard explaining it, Michio Kaku I'm not.

edit:

Overall, the graph/photo is showing that at some wavelengths of IR, you're seeing peaks of emission/reflection due to electrons jumping between valance bands, and in others due to quantum-mechanical interactions. This is totally normal, and it's how/why things have colors and peaks/dips in reflection/emission in the EM spectrum.

[edit on 31-5-2010 by Bedlam]



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 03:06 PM
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Originally posted by OurskiesRpoisoned

The term used is Electronic. It's an electric eel, not an electronic eel.

Electronic.


Valence band. V-a-l-e-n-c-e band.

Go poke around about reflection spectra and electronic band structure.




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