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Strong Electronic Band Found in Gulf Oil. Nanotech?

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posted on May, 31 2010 @ 09:44 AM
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I was reviewing some images from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and I found this chart.


photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov...

Basically, the red area is showing a strong electronic signature.

This is concerning, suggesting a high amount of metal content. The metal content "could" be nanotech.

God forbid if they put nanotech in this oil. Could potentially produce and extinction level event.

[edit on 31-5-2010 by OurskiesRpoisoned]

[edit on 31-5-2010 by OurskiesRpoisoned]




posted on May, 31 2010 @ 09:52 AM
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nanotech stuff like from star trek ?



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 09:55 AM
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Can you clarify what you are saying? Is there a reason to suspect nanotechnology? Is there not a more natural solution to this mystery?



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:00 AM
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reply to post by Someone336
 




May 25th, 2010

Nanotech and the oil spill

Abstract:
As BP and government agencies struggle to stem the devastating flow of oil now hitting the Louisiana coast, there is growing desperation to find a solution -- and fast. Green Earth Technologies, Inc. (GET) is seeking approval from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to disperse manufactured nanoparticles in the Gulf of Mexico to remedy the oil spill. IATP and more than a dozen other organizations think this is a bad idea.

www.nanotech-now.com...

Ever heard of Red Goo?



Red Goo: Deliberately designed and released destructive nanotechnology, as opposed to accidentally created grey goo. [AS]

www.nanotech-now.com...



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:01 AM
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even if its not nanotech, metal signatures cant spellout anything good, specially not for later on when it starts raining oil.

if heavy metals get into the soil/water all the crops will be done.

were in for some serious problems....

i dunno about you all, but im building a greenhouse.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:05 AM
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reply to post by LurkerMan
 


Yes, either way it is very disturbing news.

The gooey nature of the oil is also disturbing, suggest a molecular structure. Oil is viscous. Notice the huge difference in spectral area between light sweet crude, and analysis of Gulf oil.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:14 AM
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Originally posted by OurskiesRpoisoned

Basically, the red area is showing a strong electronic signature.

This is concerning, suggesting a high amount of metal content. The metal content "could" be nanotech.


Could you elaborate on how you draw this conclusion?

Why do you think there is indications of a high metal content? What experience do you have at interpreting data like this? Could you be mistaken? Or are you just making it all up?

[edit on 31-5-2010 by Essan]



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:18 AM
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Originally posted by Essan

Originally posted by OurskiesRpoisoned

Basically, the red area is showing a strong electronic signature.

This is concerning, suggesting a high amount of metal content. The metal content "could" be nanotech.


Could you elaborate on how you draw this conclusion?

Why do you think there is indications of a high metal content? What experience do you have at interpreting data like this? Could you be mistaken? Or are you just making it all up?

[edit on 31-5-2010 by Essan]


Electronic Band can only mean that there is some sort of signal traveling through the oil.

If you have other suggestions, please feel free to share.

Heavy iron could account for red color, but not the electronic band.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:20 AM
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HAARP signature maybe?

maybe HAARP cant work without saturating an area with certain metals. (i.e chemtrails). or in this case chem-currents.

shift sea floor slightly and whammy, everybody has a bad day.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:20 AM
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From the site, an explanation of the graph:


AVIRIS data provide scientists with many different types of information about the spill. Spectroscopic laboratory analyses of the data are providing useful information about the absorption features of the crude oil's carbon-hydrogen bonds. Researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey's Spectroscopy Laboratory in Golden, Colo., are working to determine the characteristics of the oil based upon the AVIRIS measured spectral signature. As shown in Figure 2, acquired May 17, 2010, the signature of the oil measured in the infrared portion of the spectrum enables a new spectroscopically-based approach for measuring the occurrence and condition of oil and estimating the thickness of oil on the surface of the water.


I am failing to see any evidence of electrical charges or metal substances in the oil based on the OP's post. So, given the analysis of the OP, I am going to have to lean with the above poster who said "made it all up".

[edit on 2010/5/31 by TLomon]



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:23 AM
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reply to post by OurskiesRpoisoned
 


I just want to point out that graph superposition isn't always the best way to demonstrate causality and/or associations:





Not saying that you're not correct, just saying some further evidence would be welcome in substantiating the theory.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:25 AM
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Originally posted by LurkerMan
HAARP signature maybe?

maybe HAARP cant work without saturating an area with certain metals. (i.e chemtrails). or in this case chem-currents.

shift sea floor slightly and whammy, everybody has a bad day.


Possibly. My best guess would be a control signal, hence the streaks in the oil.

Something like this animation




posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:29 AM
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Originally posted by schrodingers dog


Not saying that you're not correct, just saying some further evidence would be welcome in substantiating the theory.


Yes, some information from you would be nice. I've seen your research. I'm trying to help the folks in the Gulf. Worst case should be assumed, and realized that this is a potential terrorist attack, eclipsing 9-11.

If you want to debunk this, please, by all means, bring forth something that suggests otherwise. Until then, preparation is in order.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:35 AM
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Originally posted by Someone336
Can you clarify what you are saying? Is there a reason to suspect nanotechnology? Is there not a more natural solution to this mystery?



Yes, this has got my intrest peaked too. Has anyone tried to get samples to check this out?



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:38 AM
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Some thoughts on the content of the OP:

This is what the source has to say about the figure linked to in the op




As shown in Figure 2, acquired May 17, 2010, the signature of the oil measured in the infrared portion of the spectrum enables a new spectroscopically-based approach for measuring the occurrence and condition of oil and estimating the thickness of oil on the surface of the water.



photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov...

Since I'm anything but an expert on the subject I'll just give my two cents. Obviously this data was gathered in order to make scientific estimates about the magnitude of the oil spill. It seems spectroscopy is a promising way of getting such estimates.
I don't exactly see where the whole "electrical" part comes in - obviously the people who took the picture don't think this chart depicts anything out of the order or sinister.
So my baseline assumption is that what you are looking at here are the results of a "spectroscopically-based approach for measuring the occurrence and condition of oil" and that this is how it looks like. I don't see any indicators of something that is out of the order - maybe I just don't get it... But I usually do get the obvious things.

Then again... The jump from having evidence of electrical activity - let's assume that for a moment - to "nanotechnology" is just free association and not a sophisticated claim or anything like that. It's a thought experiment; but I fail to see how the content of the link justifies the connection.



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:40 AM
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The wavelength where the strong electronic band occurs is around .5 - 1 nm



X-rays - electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths that are typically of the order of 0.05 nm to 1 nm - are finding growing importance in nanoscale measurement technology and metrology. Their sub-nanometer wavelengths and their typical weak interactions with solids make X-ray probes a nearly ideal way of studying the structural characteristics of thin layer and nanoscaled structures that underlie much of modern nanotechnology.

www.nanotech-now.com...

Now, compare that, thin layer with



Different molecules within the body result in the formation of a wide variety of microstructures. Interface Sciences Corporation has, through the use of its patented technology and patented application methods, synthetically recreated Mother Nature's ability to create self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) up to several layers thick depending on the application.

The marriage of nanoparticulates and SAMs provides direct access to a new class of nanostructured hybrid materials that are very useful as environmental sorbent materials,

www.physorg.com...



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:44 AM
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reply to post by OurskiesRpoisoned
 


If you have other suggestions, please feel free to share.

Ummm, the oil has some mineral content, which as it is being churned and passing thru layers of cold to warm seawater (which is an electrolyte), it is creating a static electric charge? Like dragging one's feet thru carpet, except it's the wet version?



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:48 AM
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Originally posted by wylekat
reply to post by OurskiesRpoisoned
 


If you have other suggestions, please feel free to share.

Ummm, the oil has some mineral content, which as it is being churned and passing thru layers of cold to warm seawater (which is an electrolyte), it is creating a static electric charge? Like dragging one's feet thru carpet, except it's the wet version?


So are you also under the impression that the "strong electric band in oil" basically means something like "movement of electrons from "pure light sweet crude oil" to "crue oil in scattering medium" ?
That's my initial take and that is simply not an unusual thing to have uncovered. But I'm still trying to grasp it completely. You sound sophisticated in these things... care to elaborate? thanks...



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:51 AM
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Originally posted by wylekat
reply to post by OurskiesRpoisoned
 


If you have other suggestions, please feel free to share.

Ummm, the oil has some mineral content, which as it is being churned and passing thru layers of cold to warm seawater (which is an electrolyte), it is creating a static electric charge? Like dragging one's feet thru carpet, except it's the wet version?


Maybe. Some acid would need to be present. The gooey nature of the oils suggest molecular bonding. Dispersants are supposed to break down the oil.

Something, is bonding the oil, and turning it red.

Has anything on this oil spill not seemed suspicious.

Come on people, time to start asking some serious questions.

[edit on 31-5-2010 by OurskiesRpoisoned]



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 10:56 AM
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Originally posted by NichirasuKenshin

Originally posted by wylekat
reply to post by OurskiesRpoisoned
 


If you have other suggestions, please feel free to share.

Ummm, the oil has some mineral content, which as it is being churned and passing thru layers of cold to warm seawater (which is an electrolyte), it is creating a static electric charge? Like dragging one's feet thru carpet, except it's the wet version?


So are you also under the impression that the "strong electric band in oil" basically means something like "movement of electrons from "pure light sweet crude oil" to "crue oil in scattering medium" ?
That's my initial take and that is simply not an unusual thing to have uncovered. But I'm still trying to grasp it completely. You sound sophisticated in these things... care to elaborate? thanks...


Whatever is in the oil, is highly reflective. Light sweet crude is not. Oxidized metal in the oil (rust) would turn the oil red, but should not be reflective, and should not bond the oil together.



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