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Black holes and the speed of light

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posted on May, 30 2010 @ 03:49 PM
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I have a question. Most people are familiar with what a black hole is. Some say that a rotating black hole has an actual singularity due to centrifugal force which can combat gravity.

Now It says you might be able to pass through the singularity and enter through it if you exceed the speed of light.

But as you all know a black hole has an event horizon.

The event horizon is the place where not even light can escape. But that raises the question.

Since you are pulled into the black hole shouldn't have you already exceeded the speed of light?


I say this because as you go deeper into the hole your speed should increase, due to gravity, causing you to go faster than light and through the singularity.


I also think that, since this is the case, shouldn't you be able to use a singularity for a gravity boost.

I mean you can extract the gravitational energy from the black hole by turning around and exiting faster than you came in allowing you to exceed light speed.


I will get on to tidal forces. Tidal forces occur because of the difference in gravity from one part of you to another.

SO shouldn't you be able to balance that out with a pushing force behind you?




posted on May, 30 2010 @ 04:21 PM
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I have a question about blackholes too, where do they go? Is it to the other side of the universe like a worm hole? Where does everything it sucks up go? To another universe, dimension?



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by AltraVision
I have a question about blackholes too, where do they go? Is it to the other side of the universe like a worm hole? Where does everything it sucks up go? To another universe, dimension?


Black holes are the remnants of stars that had a mass of over 3.2 solar masses after they went supernova.

They get an infinite energy density which causes spacetime to go into them creating gravity.

Black holes don't go anywhere.

When something goes into a black hole they get sent to a singularity, the center of the black hole, but the singularity is supposed to be infinitely small and so it is usually regarded as another universe because normal physics are not applied in a black hole.

In rotating black holes however, there is centrifugal force to combat the force of gravity. Making a ring singularity, which could lead to the other universe or another place in our own universe, but to travel into it would require speeds faster than light.

Which goes back to my original question.

As you can see I have studied this topic intensely but I am truly stumped by this.



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 04:43 PM
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Correct me if I'm wrong.

But black holes release some of the material that gets pulled in via massive polar jets.


It eventually has nowhere to go and gets forced out with amazingly high kinetic force.

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The best way, that I find, to think of blackholes; is to imagine space as a fabric. The gravity of planets and stars would resemble depressions in this fabric, similar to laying a bowling ball on your bed. The greater the density, the deeper the depressions.

A blackhole, however, is more like punching a hole through your mattress; versus the mild and severe depressions of placing objects on your bed. Getting near it might get you caught in the declining, damaged material. But once you reach the lip of that hole in the mattress, you fall at an exponential rate, just a MASSIVE spike in momentum.


However, the whole thing about "lightspeed" travel ... I don't believe the particles that get drawn in would be accelerated to lightspeed. I believe blackholes would do well do give it a huge boost, but the implications of E=MC² would kick in and the you would have a constant effect of matter wanting to take up more space ... but massive forces won't relent, and continue to compact everything into a very small space.



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As for lightspeed or faster than lightspeeds, I would suggest looking into the theory of subspace travel. Theoretically, the fastest thing in the Universe is NOT light, it is actually the fabric of spacetime. Since ... it reacts instantaneously, and the effects are felt right there and then.

Some people have been led to believe that traveling via such a buffer would remove the obstacles. Acceleration of matter could proceed without meeting with any stray particles, by passing a massive void and coming out unscathed at their destination.

People have imagined various ways of implementing this, but have succeeded in none. Perhaps someday in the future, I hope.



[edit on 30-5-2010 by SentientBeyondDesign]



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 04:53 PM
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Black Holes don't go anywhere. They are just superconcentrated matter. The more matter, the more gravity.

If you were to go into one, regardless of technology you would be instantly ripped apart, atom by atom.

Untill what used to be you reaches the core which fit's on the tip of a needle.

black holes are neither black, or holes. They are the universe pulling itself back together again.

This is not the first universe to exist. Or the first big bang. it is a cycle.



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 05:08 PM
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Originally posted by IntastellaBurst
If you were to go into one, regardless of technology you would be instantly ripped apart, atom by atom.

Untill what used to be you reaches the core which fit's on the tip of a needle.


Tidal forces are forces nonetheless, and forces can be balanced by other forces.

So can it apply to black holes?



posted on May, 30 2010 @ 05:15 PM
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Originally posted by SentientBeyondDesign
Correct me if I'm wrong.

But black holes release some of the material that gets pulled in via massive polar jets.


It eventually has nowhere to go and gets forced out with amazingly high kinetic force.


Yeah because of the singularity not being able to take it in due to the massive amounts of things coming in.






However, the whole thing about "lightspeed" travel ... I don't believe the particles that get drawn in would be accelerated to lightspeed. I believe black holes would do well do give it a huge boost, but the implications of E=MC² would kick in and the you would have a constant effect of matter wanting to take up more space ... but massive forces won't relent, and continue to compact everything into a very small space.


Well it still continues to go toward the black hole and since light can't come out it implies that it's escape velocity is faster than light. So as you go increasingly into the black hole your speed increases to faster than light.



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