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The Ultimate Social Experiment of the Illuminati

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posted on May, 29 2010 @ 11:27 AM
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Originally posted by ogbert
reply to post by Afterthought
 


Have you considered this?



Jesus
The Greek word for Jesus comprises six letters:

iota = 10, eta = 8, sigma = 200, omicron = 70, upsilon = 400, sigma = 200. Arithmetic sum = 888.

This is intriguing. The number 8 in scripture denotes a new beginning and Jesus gave new birth to mankind. Also, triple 8 could imply a new beginning given by a triune God, through Jesus. There is more support for a special significance of 888. Consider the following phrases: "The Founder" and "I am the Life". Each phrase can be closely associated with Jesus and, amazingly, each sums to 888 in Greek! Also, 888 = 37 × 24. Now 37 denotes "Word of God" or simply "God" and 24 denotes “priesthood”. So Jesus is the Word of God, Divine and our High Priest all in one!

One of the intriguing aspects of Bible gematria is the way it links both Hebrew and Greek text. Consider the phrase

"the salvation of our God" in Ps 98.3. In Hebrew this is "Yeshoth Elohenu" which sums to 888! The number points the reader of Psalms to Jesus!



Biblical Gematria



I find your post to be so intriguing that I wanted to quote it again here for those who may have breezed past it. Plus, you helped open my eyes too with this wonderful numerical interpretation of the name Jesus.
I'd give you a flag if I could.




posted on May, 31 2010 @ 03:27 PM
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Since the Hash House Harriers is considered a subculture, I'd like to examine what defines a cult. What characteristics come together to determine if something is a cult.
Regarding the Hash House Harriers, I've already provided proof that they consider their group to be religious. They even have a Religious Advisor declared within each kennel.

Here is a list of cult characteristics proceeded by a note from the author. -

"Compare these patterns to the situation you were in (or in which you, a family member, or friend is currently involved). This list may help you determine if there is cause for concern. Bear in mind that this list is not meant to be a “cult scale” or a definitive checklist to determine if a specific group is a cult. This is not so much a diagnostic instrument as it is an analytical tool."

-‪ The group displays excessively zealous and unquestioning commitment to its leader and (whether he is alive or dead) regards his belief system, ideology, and practices as the Truth, as law.

-‪ Questioning, doubt, and dissent are discouraged or even punished.

-‪ Mind-altering practices (such as meditation, chanting, speaking in tongues, denunciation sessions, and debilitating work routines) are used in excess and serve to suppress doubts about the group and its leader(s).

-‪ The leadership dictates, sometimes in great detail, how members should think, act, and feel (for example, members must get permission to date, change jobs, marry—or leaders prescribe what types of clothes to wear, where to live, whether or not to have children, how to discipline children, and so forth).

-‪ The group is elitist, claiming a special, exalted status for itself, its leader(s) and members (for example, the leader is considered the Messiah, a special being, an avatar—or the group and/or the leader is on a special mission to save humanity).

-‪ The group has a polarized us-versus-them mentality, which may cause conflict with the wider society.

‪- The leader is not accountable to any authorities (unlike, for example, teachers, military commanders or ministers, priests, monks, and rabbis of mainstream religious denominations).

-‪ The group teaches or implies that its supposedly exalted ends justify whatever means it deems necessary. This may result in members' participating in behaviors or activities they would have considered reprehensible or unethical before joining the group (for example, lying to family or friends, or collecting money for bogus charities).

-‪ The leadership induces feelings of shame and/or guilt iin order to influence and/or control members. Often, this is done through peer pressure and subtle forms of persuasion.

-‪ Subservience to the leader or group requires members to cut ties with family and friends, and radically alter the personal goals and activities they had before joining the group.

-‪ The group is preoccupied with bringing in new members.

-‪ The group is preoccupied with making money.

-‪ Members are expected to devote inordinate amounts of time to the group and group-related activities.

-‪ Members are encouraged or required to live and/or socialize only with other group members.

-‪ The most loyal members (the “true believers”) feel there can be no life outside the context of the group. They believe there is no other way to be, and often fear reprisals to themselves or others if they leave (or even consider leaving) the group.

www.csj.org...

After examining these reference points, I have no choice but to determine that the Hash House Harriers was indeed designed by Gispert to be a cult, which was later manipulated further by the KGB.

I realize that this may be a shock to people who have been involved in hashing for a long time & never stopped to consider exactly what they were involved in.
It's OK if you've been fooled by them because it's easy to be drawn into the idea of having "fun" & achieving close nit friends as many hash websites brag about. Now that you are becoming aware of how psychology is being used upon its members & for what purpose, it's time to get out. Run like you've never r*n before. It's not ('u') you they're concerning with & allowing them to have access to your energy is not doing you any good.

Gispert & his cronies obviously started this fraternity as a facade to their luciferian agenda as well as a means to funnel money into activities that their "brothers" were or weren't privy to.
When the KGB began infiltrating the Hasher subculture, they knew the psychology to use in order to promote their agenda of breaking down American morals & values. Shortly after this, it was bye-bye Leave it to Beaver & hello Lady Gaga.

The Illuminati is a cult & needs sub-cults to promote their own ideals.
They want nothing more than to dumb down people & promote ritualistic abuse. As soon as it becomes the norm to humiliate yourself & degrade the people you consider to be friends, all bets are off & they have moved in for the check mate.

I will post more evidence as it arises.
Thank you for your attention.






[edit on 31-5-2010 by Afterthought]

[edit on 31-5-2010 by Afterthought]



posted on May, 31 2010 @ 05:27 PM
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I had spoken earlier of the Hashers use of the term On-On.
I now believe that this term also has a double meaning.
The Illuminati are extremely crafty when it comes to linguistics.
I first proposed that On-On was the opposite of No-No, which I still believe to be a correct assessment due to the fact that Hashers celebrate the opposite of goodness & virtue.
It has a second meaning though.
'ON' was the Greek city of Heliopolis, or the City of the Sun.
This term is highly significant evidence that Gispert was an Illuminated Freemason. He & his friends created the language of their fraternity based around the masonic symbolism of the sun, which verifies that his nickname 'G' is also evidence that he was a freemason.
The ON is discussed in the following video after the 9 minute mark.
www.youtube.com...



posted on Jun, 4 2010 @ 07:31 PM
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This is truly strange.

I was turning on the TV to put in a movie, when I started watching the WWE's ceremonial funeral of "The Undertaker" & his brother's performance.

I don't watch wrestling, but this led me to log into the WWE Smackdown's website.
Then, I came upon this video (but not from that website): www.youtube.com...

It's only 0.38 seconds long, but pay special attention to the triple helix (888) on both sides of the screen towards the end. It's in the color electric blue.

I'm going to try to find the clip of the mock funeral they played on the TV. It's very significant to understanding what's really going on.

Truth is always stranger than fiction, & science fiction will always proceed science fact.



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 01:31 PM
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Wow, I really liked the video link of "How to brainwash a nation". I hate to continue here from another thread, but it's apparent that we both have our minds made up what we beleive. So theres no point in debating or arguing. My original point was that I was curious if others saw the same similarities I did in church services & hashes. I had asked my friend who introduced me to hashing if he felt the same way and he kind of looked at me funny. This site is what popped up in Google.
Of the several criteria for being considered a cult, I truly only saw maybe 2 or 3 that would apply to the hash. Heck, if one applied the same questioning to almost any organization, say the Cub Scouts, one would probably come to the conclusion that they are a cult as well.

Personal question here, to debate with someone in hopes of finding a resolution or common ground upon which both agree, both parties must have a common starting point. To debate the bible, both must agree that God exsists and that He inspired the Bible. So what are your beliefs based on? I'm guessing a right leaning , God fearing old fashioned individual. This isnt meant as a poke at you. I just want to know where your beliefs llie.



posted on Jul, 11 2010 @ 08:15 PM
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can someone summarize this?



posted on Oct, 28 2012 @ 12:22 PM
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reply to post by Afterthought
 


You've either been to a weird kennel or you don't know a thing about hashing. I was a member of a cult. I know the signs. Now I hash. And while some of these statements could loosely apply to any group, it's all about the level of control. I do not and have not seen that in hashing.


-‪ The group displays excessively zealous and unquestioning commitment to its leader and (whether he is alive or dead) regards his belief system, ideology, and practices as the Truth, as law.

The hash has no leadership or leader except at the local kennel level. There is no overseeing group. The hash had a founder, Gispert, who died in 1942. Where I hash, one of the kennels has a hash once/year in honor of Gispert's birthday and that's about 95-99% of the concern given to him throughout the year. We follow the principles of the game, not considering it "law".

To say local leadership is given unquestioning commitment is a joke and laughable.


-‪ Questioning, doubt, and dissent are discouraged or even punished.

To a certain extent there is some conformity at a local level. As ANY group in the world would have. It's a club based on an activity. Participants come to expect that activity, so radical change to the format is discouraged.

Usually things come to operate the way they do through trial and error. Once you find a happy center, people anywhere don't like change, but ideas aren't discouraged. Just like in church if somebody stood up and proposed bringing in TVs next week and watching football.

Dissent is not discouraged and if it is punished, it is punished by having the person drink a beer. Which, by the way, is also how people are rewarded.


-‪ Mind-altering practices (such as meditation, chanting, speaking in tongues, denunciation sessions, and debilitating work routines) are used in excess and serve to suppress doubts about the group and its leader(s)

Well, there is usually alcohol involved and singing. Boy scouts sing and it happens in church. None of the hash songs are meant to suppress doubts and few are even about hashing, like the "Dos a beer, a mexican beer" song. Look it up and tell me how that reinforces submission to leadership. Many songs are the same ones rugby clubs sing.


-‪ The leadership dictates, sometimes in great detail, how members should think, act, and feel (for example, members must get permission to date, change jobs, marry—or leaders prescribe what types of clothes to wear, where to live, whether or not to have children, how to discipline children, and so forth).

Not much of this applies to the hash. Permission to date? Marry? Change jobs? Are you serious? No way this applies to hashers. As for dress, many kennels will make you take a drink out of your shoe if you happen to wear brand new ones or if you're not wearing some form of hash dress like a t-shirt. And where they name hashers, many wear bracelets or necklaces with their names so others can remember our wacky names.

Where to live? Whether or not to have children? The hash in no way invades people's personal lives like this.


-‪ The group is elitist, claiming a special, exalted status for itself, its leader(s) and members (for example, the leader is considered the Messiah, a special being, an avatar—or the group and/or the leader is on a special mission to save humanity).

The only thing we claim is to have a lot of fun. Leader or messiah? Not where I hash. Saving humanity? Get serious.


-‪ The group has a polarized us-versus-them mentality, which may cause conflict with the wider society.

There are certainly hashers and non-hashers who may not get us (like the person who first wrote about this conspiracy). But we do not shelter among ourselves looking out at the rest of humanity. We all go back to normal lives after a hash.


- The leader is not accountable to any authorities (unlike, for example, teachers, military commanders or ministers, priests, monks, and rabbis of mainstream religious denominations).

As stated above, we had a founder who's been dead for 70 years. The only leaders are local and nobody considers them above the law.



-‪ The group teaches or implies that its supposedly exalted ends justify whatever means it deems necessary. This may result in members' participating in behaviors or activities they would have considered reprehensible or unethical before joining the group (for example, lying to family or friends, or collecting money for bogus charities).

This may be true partially. I've seen hashers lay trails that trespass on private or corporate property. We run through and we're often gone before anybody even knows we were there. But if trespassing with no vandalism is the worst crime, I'd say that's pretty tame.

...To be continued



posted on Oct, 28 2012 @ 01:43 PM
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reply to post by Afterthought
 




-‪ The leadership induces feelings of shame and/or guilt in order to influence and/or control members. Often, this is done through peer pressure and subtle forms of persuasion.

Control in what way? People in our group who are obnoxious are often ignored (a normal reaction anywhere).


-‪ Subservience to the leader or group requires members to cut ties with family and friends, and radically alter the personal goals and activities they had before joining the group.

I don't think this has EVER happened in any hash anywhere in the world.


-‪ The group is preoccupied with bringing in new members.

Yes, we like and welcome new people. And we hope they will like it. Preoccupied? Not really. Some groups may advertise, we don't. It's word-of-mouth.

"Join the club' mentality is everywhere. Many people find something they like and want to share it with others. Newlyweds try to set up their friends. New parents are asking their married friends when they are going to have kids? It's human nature to find something you love and try to get your friends to join in. Perhaps so you share even more in common and can talk about experiences.


-‪ The group is preoccupied with making money.

Ha! Just to cover the cost of beer, not for profit. Only a couple of the local kennels keep a bank account. If it gets too high, we throw a party and fund it with the surplus. The money goes towards funding things like beer and food in advance. If we don't have enough people show up, it takes a hit. The balance is seldom over a couple hundred dollars.


-‪ Members are expected to devote inordinate amounts of time to the group and group-related activities.

Not all are required to submit their time, but like any group, the hash needs volunteers to devote more time on occasion. Somebody has to lay a trail every week. And not all participate.


-‪ Members are encouraged or required to live and/or socialize only with other group members.

Not true at all. Sometimes it happens that people live together and/or become good friends and do most of their socializing together.

Sometimes it depends on where you live. Hashers are generally not prudish. While in some areas, many people are. So I can see choosing to socialize with mostly hashers, but nobody is required to do so.


-‪ The most loyal members (the “true believers”) feel there can be no life outside the context of the group. They believe there is no other way to be, and often fear reprisals to themselves or others if they leave (or even consider leaving) the group.

Membership is not even a concept at the hash. There's no joining or leaving. You either show up to a run or you don't. Some people have disappeared from time to time. When spoken of, I usually hear good things. Great trails somebody laid, something funny they did, or of missing them. Those who stop showing up aren't chastised or made to feel bad for it.

And if people come back, they are welcomed (unless they were a jerk we didn't want back).

I can see why people may see real life as boring. We're a club who drinks and runs. It's fun to be around people who have similar interests/hobbies. Like a member of a model airplane club might only hang out with other members who share his hobby.

------

Seriously. There's nothing sinister or cultish. Believe me, I grew up in a cult and I have read about and recognize the signs of a cult. I know. Hashing does not use that type of control over people and does not begin to display the concepts listed in the criteria anywhere close to the level of a real cult.

The hash is NOT a cult and hashers do not consider it a religion, though they do parody religion at times.

Any group could fit the criteria listed above to some extent. The question is to what end? If it is to control the lives of the members and keep them isolated and prevent them from ever leaving, it's cultish.

If group control simply consists of wanting everybody to follow the same rules of a game, I don't see that it counts. For instance, the things about dissent. Suppose you have a chess club that requires silence during play. People are encouraged to follow the rule for the benefit of all. People who don't might be considered unwelcome or punished in some form. And in the game, you can't all-of-a-sudden decide that a knight can also move like a rook.

So any group has traditions, customs, and rules.

Those of you reading, please, find a website for your local hash house harriers and come run for yourself. You'll either like it or you won't. But you just might love it. All levels of fitness are usually welcome. You will probably hear some "dirty" words and might, in some areas, get flashed. So if you are a prude, might not want to go.

I guarantee there's no mind-control that will get you addicted. You can try it once and decide. If you get addicted, it's because you love it.
edit on 28-10-2012 by excultmember because: expounding on a point.





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