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Double Slit Experiment Debunked

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posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 12:20 AM
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Originally posted by mnemeth1
reply to post by xmaddness
 


Its a blatant interference pattern.

Diffraction in lasers occurs in gases, not solid objects.



Yes, it is your basic run of the mill wave interference pattern. This can be caused by slits, by multiple slits, by circular, square, whatever shape apertures. It can be caused by just about any obstacle a wave encounters. My personal favorite diffraction pattern is Hexes.

web.njit.edu...

Seen here. Looks like a snow flake.

Im not exactly sure what you mean by "Diffraction in lasers occurs in gases, not solid objects."

Care to elaborate?

[edit on 29-4-2010 by xmaddness]




posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 12:25 AM
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Originally posted by xmaddness

Originally posted by mnemeth1
reply to post by xmaddness
 


Its a blatant interference pattern.

Diffraction in lasers occurs in gases, not solid objects.



Yes, it is your basic run of the mill wave interference pattern. This can be caused by slits, by multiple slits, by circular, square, whatever shape apertures. It can be caused by just about any obstacle a wave encounters.

Im not exactly sure what you mean by "Diffraction in lasers occurs in gases, not solid objects."

Care to elaborate?


No, it can't be caused by a slit - its caused by double slits ONLY or by a solid bar ONLY

Diffraction patterns in lasers occur because of particles, not slits. Diffraction of lasers occurs in gases, not solids.

The interference pattern observed by the his needle experiment clearly destroys quantum theory's explanation of the double slit experiment interference pattern.

Also, any old wave WILL NOT cause an interference pattern when passing a solid bar - only light acts this way. Waves pass around solid objects without causing an interference pattern.


[edit on 29-4-2010 by mnemeth1]



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 12:30 AM
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Originally posted by mnemeth1

No, it can't be caused by a slit - its caused by double slits ONLY or by a solid bar ONLY

[edit on 29-4-2010 by mnemeth1]



Well, having actually done these experiments myself, I am going to tell you that yes, it can be done with single slits, and all the others I mentioned above.

I take this time to kindly agree to disagree and I take my leave of this thread.



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 12:36 AM
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Maybe it is like quantum entanglement, (and explains entanglement).

But that every atom in the universe is entangled with every other atom in the universe.

Strangely enough, this makes a lot of sense to me.



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 12:43 AM
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Originally posted by xmaddness

Originally posted by mnemeth1

No, it can't be caused by a slit - its caused by double slits ONLY or by a solid bar ONLY

[edit on 29-4-2010 by mnemeth1]



Well, having actually done these experiments myself, I am going to tell you that yes, it can be done with single slits, and all the others I mentioned above.

I take this time to kindly agree to disagree and I take my leave of this thread.



If you're creating interference patterns with a single slit, then it must be a micro-sized slice of laser that's still causing an interference pattern for the same reasons as he describes in the OP.

The quantum theory of light can not account for interference patterns around solid objects - or single slits. Either way, quantum theory is at a loss to explain the pattern.





[edit on 29-4-2010 by mnemeth1]



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 12:54 AM
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reply to post by mnemeth1
 

bill gaede. I got a thread about his life story. He used to work with the government.

The ultimate alternative personality, Bill Gaede

He brought some interesting points in some of his videos, especially regarding human extinction, but that's for some other time.
There's no need to take him too seriously though.



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 01:02 AM
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reply to post by Jazzyguy
 



I don't fully subscribe to his "rope" hypothesis, however he is an excellent logical thinker and clearly shows the flaws of standing theory that quantum theorists hold up as gospel.

An entertaining fellow to say the least.


[edit on 29-4-2010 by mnemeth1]



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 01:12 AM
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Debunked?!

Your the guy that calls relativity junk right?

I hate to tell you but the double slit experiment has been done so many times it hard to keep track. By professional scientists that have professional equipment.

They also have gone as far as to fire on photon at a time. This guy, while entertaining, does not debunk anything.

I think you should start reading some quantum physics books before you start trying to debunk anything.

I know we do not fully understand quantum mechanics, but we obviously understand some of it, seeing it is responsible for most of the electronics you see today. Maybe you should spend some time expanding on what is already thought to be known, then trying to debunk things that already have been proved and understood. Apparently you do not understand how this experiment is done.

Deny ignorance buddy, don't embrace it.

Pred...



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 01:33 AM
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reply to post by predator0187
 


quantum theory can not explain interference patterns by laser light around a solid object.

hence, its junk.

find me the explanation and I'll shut up.



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 01:36 AM
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Hi
This is my take on the double-slit experiment.

Light is considered to a wave made up of particles (photons). When light is shone thru double slits, the photons in the light wave interact with each other to form an interference pattern. Nothing strange there.

When single photons are fired at the slits, with a pause in between each successive photon, an interference pattern still results. The only way this can be possible is that the single photon goes thru both slits simultaneously and interferes with itself to create the interference pattern. This is true ONLY if no measurement is made at the slits to see thru which slit the photon passes.

The key is that the double-slit experiment fires SINGLE photons.

So, when observed, light has a particle nature, and when unobserved, a wave nature.

Regards



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 04:20 AM
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Originally posted by mnemeth1
No, it can't be caused by a slit - its caused by double slits ONLY or by a solid bar ONLY
Diffraction patterns in lasers occur because of particles, not slits. Diffraction of lasers occurs in gases, not solids.


Can I get a source for this statement that is not in a video?



The interference pattern observed by the his needle experiment clearly destroys quantum theory's explanation of the double slit experiment interference pattern.






Also, any old wave WILL NOT cause an interference pattern when passing a solid bar - only light acts this way. Waves pass around solid objects without causing an interference pattern.


What is an old wave? You mean like a water wave? Please explain this then:



and this:



[edit on 29-4-2010 by daniel_g]



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 04:44 AM
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reply to post by mnemeth1
 




quantum theory can not explain interference patterns by laser light around a solid object.

hence, its junk.

find me the explanation and I'll shut up.
Well, maybe if you bothered to properly read through your own thread, you'd see that the answer was given to you on page one. You clearly don't have a clue what your talking about. The double slit experiment, when done with electrons, clearly shows the electrons are particle-waves...there is no bouncing off the sides, because that would NOT create an interference pattern. When electrons are fired singularly, they can and will interfere with themselves and still create an interference pattern. The interference pattern you see caused by the pin is created in the same way as the double slit experiment. The probability wave function of the photon/electron has two paths to choose from, and it will seep through both possible ways at the same time, the probability wave function will combine on the other side because they are so close and hence interfere with each other, resulting in an interference pattern, much like a typical water version demonstrating the wave interference principle. Also, if quantum theory is wrong, I'd like you to explain why the wave function of said particle-wave can be collapsed by simply observing it.

EDIT: Lets take this picture for instance:
The dot surrounded by circles/waves represents an electron with its position spread out in a cloud of probabilities. This enables the electron to "seep" through both holes at once, thus it then interferes with its self in the other side. What do you think would happen to a photon from that laser when it reaches the pin? It acts like a wave and instead of going around the pin one certain way, it sort of melts around the pin then interferes with its self...however, I don't think the pin is thin enough to cause this quantum scale effect, and the poster below me is probably actually correct in assuming it's simply a result of diffraction causing the uniform photons from the laser to curve as seen in the following diagram:


[edit on 29/4/10 by CHA0S]



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 05:48 AM
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reply to post by mnemeth1
 


I think this could be explained simply by diffraction - light bends around the needle, and this creates two new sources separated by the needle.

www.ngsir.netfirms.com...

hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 07:32 AM
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Originally posted by mnemeth1

Originally posted by Thermo Klein
A laser pointer is NOT natural light
It's created as successive waves of light, and what makes it a laser is that all the variance is taken out! This disproves nothing except that a LASER POINTER doesn't have particles floating around...


Natural light is not what is used, monochromatic light is what is used for double slit experiments.



And laser diodes are not monocromatic sources either. A typical diode may have a spectral width of 5 or 6 nm @ full width width half power and much greater than that at lower powers. So a 670nm diode may have an output range of 650 to 690nm at full width quarter power.

Hence, a little diffraction from the needle will give a nice interference pattern.



[edit on 29/4/2010 by LightFantastic]



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 08:17 AM
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Originally posted by CHA0S
reply to post by mnemeth1
 




quantum theory can not explain interference patterns by laser light around a solid object.

hence, its junk.

find me the explanation and I'll shut up.
Well, maybe if you bothered to properly read through your own thread, you'd see that the answer was given to you on page one. You clearly don't have a clue what your talking about. The double slit experiment, when done with electrons, clearly shows the electrons are particle-waves...there is no bouncing off the sides, because that would NOT create an interference pattern. When electrons are fired singularly, they can and will interfere with themselves and still create an interference pattern. The interference pattern you see caused by the pin is created in the same way as the double slit experiment. The probability wave function of the photon/electron has two paths to choose from, and it will seep through both possible ways at the same time, the probability wave function will combine on the other side because they are so close and hence interfere with each other, resulting in an interference pattern, much like a typical water version demonstrating the wave interference principle. Also, if quantum theory is wrong, I'd like you to explain why the wave function of said particle-wave can be collapsed by simply observing it.

EDIT: Lets take this picture for instance:
The dot surrounded by circles/waves represents an electron with its position spread out in a cloud of probabilities. This enables the electron to "seep" through both holes at once, thus it then interferes with its self in the other side. What do you think would happen to a photon from that laser when it reaches the pin? It acts like a wave and instead of going around the pin one certain way, it sort of melts around the pin then interferes with its self...however, I don't think the pin is thin enough to cause this quantum scale effect, and the poster below me is probably actually correct in assuming it's simply a result of diffraction causing the uniform photons from the laser to curve as seen in the following diagram:


[edit on 29/4/10 by CHA0S]


Your vague explanation doesn't cut it buddy.

I want a scientific paper showing how quantum theory can account for the findings.

It can't.

So stop dreaming.



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 08:19 AM
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Originally posted by Maslo
reply to post by mnemeth1
 


I think this could be explained simply by diffraction - light bends around the needle, and this creates two new sources separated by the needle.

www.ngsir.netfirms.com...

hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...


Wave diffraction around a solid object does not produce an interference pattern.

In fact that hyperphysics link proves my point. - no interference pattern.




[edit on 29-4-2010 by mnemeth1]



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 08:20 AM
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Well, I know for a fact that sound (which propagates as a wave) diffracts around solid objects so I will disagree with the "any old wave won't produce a diffraction pattern statement". I also know that a single slit does produce a diffraction pattern because I had to do it in my undergrad physics lab. I guess I found this video to be one big testament FOR the particle/wave duality of light because light's behavior in this situation acts exactly how I would expect a wave to.

Single-slit diffraction pattern:
en.wikipedia.org...-slit_diffraction

[edit on 29-4-2010 by TheCuriousEngineer]

[edit on 29-4-2010 by TheCuriousEngineer]



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 08:25 AM
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Originally posted by TheCuriousEngineer
Well, I know for a fact that sound (which propagates as a wave) diffracts around solid objects so I will disagree with the "any old wave won't produce a diffraction pattern statement". I also know that a single slit does produce a diffraction pattern because I had to do it in my undergrad physics lab. I guess I found this video to be one big testament FOR the particle/wave duality of light because light's behavior in this situation acts exactly how I would expect a wave to.

Single-slit diffraction pattern:
en.wikipedia.org...-slit_diffraction

[edit on 29-4-2010 by TheCuriousEngineer]

[edit on 29-4-2010 by TheCuriousEngineer]


If you take the time to read the wiki link, you'll see it fully supports what I'm saying.

There is nothing in quantum theory that can account for the interference pattern of laser light around a solid object.

There is nothing in quantum theory that can account for the interference pattern of laser light when its passed through a micro-fine single slit.

There are no quantum explanations for these findings.



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 08:37 AM
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I guess I am confused about your argument then, if you are saying that the official explanation of quantum physics for the double slit experiment is that photons are bouncing off the walls on the outside of the slits I don't think that is the case at all. I think the explanation is that because photons propagate in a wavelike manner they can interfere destructively, hence the pattern of bright and dark spots.



posted on Apr, 29 2010 @ 09:22 AM
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Originally posted by TheCuriousEngineer
I guess I am confused about your argument then, if you are saying that the official explanation of quantum physics for the double slit experiment is that photons are bouncing off the walls on the outside of the slits I don't think that is the case at all. I think the explanation is that because photons propagate in a wavelike manner they can interfere destructively, hence the pattern of bright and dark spots.


there are two descriptions of how such interference patterns are formed in quantum.

one is particle theory that says little balls bounce off the corners.

the other is wave theory that says waves passing through the slits interfere with each other.


neither wave nor particle explanations can account for why an interference pattern is seen when a laser is passed over a solid post, such as his needle.

waves pass around solid objects without creating an interference pattern.

in the micro-fine single slit experiments that create interference patterns, such patterns can be described and predicted, but the actual cause is left undefined. In slits that are not less than a millimeter wide, no interference waves are generated when a laser is pointed at them.




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