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Housing prices forecast to fall in 2010 -- and could keep falling for years

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posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 12:07 PM
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Inflation, is taxation without legislation.

The Illuminati play this paper game with corporations and in the end the country is left broke, with millions to starvation. They last did it in Ukraine.

The whole banking thing is just more B.S. they are hiding assets off the record for future profit. Some of the hiding assets are unknown as well, because so many people abandon they're homes knowing they can't pay for them.

The banks owe the Transfer-payer (Ta-x) Being the people whom created the 3 Trillion Bailout. They're intentions seem good, since it had a trickle effect, everywhere.

We will see what happens in the coming months. The banks may hold the paper saying that they own the properties, but the Transfer-payer really owns the properties.

Possession is only 9/10's of the law, the other 1/10 is control of the property entirely.

Just my thoughts, good find by the way.




posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 01:02 PM
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Originally posted by GrampsLEn

Originally posted by belial259

Graph


[edit on 26-4-2010 by belial259]


Cool graph. Do you know if this was adjusted for inflation?


It says "inflation-adjusted" on the graph.

Yep it's cool all right.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 02:21 PM
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Originally posted by Retseh
As a Phoenix resident, we have been one of the hardest hit locations in the housing slump.

But for the first time in 3 years we are seeing prices begin to rise again.

This is just my opinion of course, but if the job market begins to strengthen and the DOW continues to strengthen, then I think it's inevitable that house prices will begin to rise, "shadow inventory" or not.


Well I guess it all depends on a few variables.
One being just how much inventory is the bank holding back from the market and the other would be how long dose the bank have the ability to keep these properties off the market. If the bank can slowly introduce the properties into the market (that is what they are trying to do now) then they may be able to prevent a more drastic decline in home values, but this will keep prices at a stagnated rate for some time to come.
If the banks wind up having to many properties in there shadow market, then they will need to begin dumping them. If this happens property values will fall substantially lower than they have to date.
Most in the know feel there is going to be a serge in foreclosures starting this fall due to the option arms coming due. If this happens the banks may need to start dumping property.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:22 PM
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Well I guess it all depends on a few variables.
One being just how much inventory is the bank holding back from the market and the other would be how long dose the bank have the ability to keep these properties off the market. If the bank can slowly introduce the properties into the market (that is what they are trying to do now) then they may be able to prevent a more drastic decline in home values, but this will keep prices at a stagnated rate for some time to come.
If the banks wind up having to many properties in there shadow market, then they will need to begin dumping them. If this happens property values will fall substantially lower than they have to date.
Most in the know feel there is going to be a serge in foreclosures starting this fall due to the option arms coming due. If this happens the banks may need to start dumping property.


When I was preparing for my Masters 3 years back a group of us did a study on the oncoming mortgage problem. We forecasted problems occurring throughout '12 because of the option arms coming due. Home owners were making ridiculously small mortgage payments for their balances at the time and still are but they all were due for restructuring within 5 years.

What isn't being addressed here is that this politically-lowered interest rate at some point in the near future will reverse dramatically and virtually guarantee a second major correction in housing prices as those miniscule adjustable rates will be replaced with some unknown much higher number. Many people foresee a huge interest rate runup before the next presidential election but I would not be surprised to see the political forces keep the rates as low as possible for as long as possible but as we all know bubbles burst eventually. The more hot air pumped in--the more violent the pop! (What has more hot air than D.C.?)

Yes--I believe the next correction will be much nastier.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 04:23 PM
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Sorry Murf.

Did not mean to plagiarize. Somehow I lost the "quote" function.



posted on Apr, 26 2010 @ 05:00 PM
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Originally posted by GrampsLEn
Sorry Murf.

Did not mean to plagiarize. Somehow I lost the "quote" function.


No problem Gramps, its happened to before as well.
You bring up an interesting point with the artificially lower interest rates. Many people put some blame on the housing collapse in Allen Green spans lap. After the teck bubble burst in the early 2000’s the fed dramatically reduced interest rates to prime the economy. Unfortunately he kept them low for to long. This is what started the housing bubble. People who took there money out of stocks were reinvesting it in real estate.
We now have low interest rates again but this time there being used by the big banks to hedge the stock market and drive it higher with cheep money from the fed and an almost guarantee that the fed will back stop any decline the market encounters. This is the new bubble (just my opinion).
Well history has proven time and time again that all bubbles must pop sooner or later.



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