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Are the Birds Losing Their Songs?

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posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 12:26 AM
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Over the past few years there have been numerous reports of birds mimicking the sounds of car alarms, ambulances, and ring tones from cell phones.

Certain birds have highly developed vocal structures and some birds are known for mimicking. However, I cannot help but wonder if some of these other birds, which are not naturally mimickers, are reacting to stress from overwhelming noises in their environment by repeating these cacophonies.

Some of the birds who have been reported in 'changing their tune' to adapt to the world of technology are mockingbirds, crows, mynas, lyrebirds, blackbirds, jays, starlings, sparrows, Jackdaws, bowerbirds, and various other songbirds.

It is thought that the birds songs are part of their genetic coding. But can humans actually cause the genetic coding of birds to change by subjecting them to constant high tech noises in their environments?


I don't believe man was meant to live by alarm clocks. It is a very harsh way to wake up and very shattering to the psyche to be shocked out of sleep. Humans were meant to be awakened sweetly to the soft chatter of morning songbirds. If you have ever done this, it changes your whole outlook for the day.

Are we destroying the wonderful gifts our creatures once gave us? Will anyone miss it before it's too late? If birds continue to mimic these harsh noises back to us, will they then become a disturbing nuisance and slated for destruction?




posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 12:32 AM
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Great post, i think on the same lines


This cracked me up




I don't believe man was meant to live by alarm clocks. It is a very harsh way to wake up and very shattering to the psyche to be shocked out of sleep. Humans were meant to be awakened sweetly to the soft chatter of morning songbirds. If you have ever done this, it changes your whole outlook for the day.


See i have a Magpie that sits out my window some mornings and imitates my friggn alarm clock
he also barks like a dog


Wally



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 12:33 AM
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Excellent post. I blogged on this recently -- about chickadee songs and communication -- as chickadees have a syntax!

naturalresonancerevolution.blogspot.com...



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 12:34 AM
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reply to post by Alethea
 


birds that sound like car alarms and ambulances? man that would be suuuper annoying.

guess im glad i live in a place without many car alarms or ambulances, and well birds that mimic haha.



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 12:54 AM
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Very interesting OP.

I believe that this will not cause any destruction to the birds themselves or their genetic code... but i do believe that we are destroying the natural beauty of their songs.

For those who have never heard mimicking birds, it's absolutely stunning.
I am not too savy with embedding videos, so here is a link to a youtube video of the lyrebird



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 01:11 AM
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reply to post by Alethea
 


Check out this little fella if you haven't heard him already



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 01:19 AM
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reply to post by Kandinsky
 


That was amazing! Chain saws. Car alarms. Camera photo lenses. Plus 20 different bird songs.



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 01:21 AM
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reply to post by Kandinsky
 


That was fantastic mate thanks, Ive been lucky enough to see these birds while out bush but never have I heard such a good camera even chainsaw impersonantion. Ive always thought they should call them Liar birds.



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 01:26 AM
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reply to post by polarwarrior
 


I have a blogbook chapter about the relation between "liar" and "lyre" in the context of natural resonance and conspiracy.

naturalresonancerevolution.blogspot.com...



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 01:34 AM
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This is a neat video of a bird mimicking construction work, I saw recently.
I think its normal for these birds to do this. Its kinda of a funny one. As far as alarm clocks go, that isn't a good way to start your day. Stress kills.
Here is the Cool Bird Link.www.liveleak.com...



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 01:47 AM
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reply to post by WIZDOMANATION
 


Sounds like he impersonates one of the workmens voices too.



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 03:52 AM
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I live in a rural part of Arkansas and I don't live in the city. Because I live so far out and because it gets pretty natural, I have learned as a result of living in the wild as to what the range of birds do from season to season and year in and year out.

I would have to agree that these days I hear more Mockingbirds making cell phone sounds and I heard one the other day that sounded like the ringer on a microwave oven when the cooking is done....that "Ting" sound. Well anyway, I would have to agree that birds are mimicking what technology provides for them to hear.

Over the years I have heard cat call whistles like the kind a construction guy would do to some passing babe. Once I even heard a baby crying and then there was that time I heard what sounded like a parrot repeating, I love you, I love you, I love you. Well anyway this topic is indeed an interesting topic once you get to looking into it. This is an interesting topic and would do well for a research subject or thesis.

Anyway, thanks for the posting. I truly enjoyed it.



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 08:22 AM
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reply to post by MaxBlack
 


That "baby crying" you heard was a catbird, they also "meow" just like a cat.
You make some interesting points Alethea, we may be changing our bird songs with all the dirty sound we produce as well as all the electrosmog that we have made a part or our surroundings. Some song bird species are in decline here in the US, though the reasons are varied. What you say may well be one of them.
Being disabled, I spend alot of time on my porch feeding birds and just watching nature. They can turn around my moods even on the worst days! How they survive the storms and harsh winter weather has always been a source of amazement to me.
One thing I know for sure, birds understand each other and react accordingly. Whether it's food or danger or just territorial calls all species have an innate understanding of the language of other birds. Right now is a great time to watch the nest building process. They can be very secretive and it requires some patience to see where they are nesting but it can be done.
One of the greatest books ever written on birding is called Bird Tracks and Sign, by Mark Elbroch. I would highly recommend any of his books as I believe he is the single most important nature writer working today.
Great post! I always love an excuse to talk about nature. Thanks



posted on Apr, 14 2010 @ 09:42 AM
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Wonderful topic.

But I did have to comment on this:


Originally posted by Alethea
I don't believe man was meant to live by alarm clocks. It is a very harsh way to wake up and very shattering to the psyche to be shocked out of sleep. Humans were meant to be awakened sweetly to the soft chatter of morning songbirds. If you have ever done this, it changes your whole outlook for the day.


I'm not sure I agree.

I think it's much more "shattering to the psyche" to be pursued by a predator looking for early morning breakfast.


I'd say alarm clocks in comparison are sweet morning love whispers.




[edit on 14-4-2010 by loam]



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