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The LHC at CERN: a Creator and not a Collider Folks!!!!

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posted on Apr, 4 2010 @ 10:03 AM
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Originally posted by Josephus23

...I am baffled as to why it takes so much energy to create the particle that is supposedly responsible for matter itself...

Because it requires energy to "pull matter apart".

The fundamental particles that make matter were more separate and distinct during the first one second of the universe's existence after the big bang. Once the energy of the universe began to dissipate (inside that first second of the universe's existence), these fundamental particles began to group together into the protons and neutrons we can see today.

Colliders such as the LHC can mimic those high-energy moments of the early universe (i.e., when the universe was about one second old) so that those fundamental particles can "fly freely".

The fundamental pieces that make up protons and neutrons that can only be "separate and distinct" (and thus detectable) in high energy states -- i.e., high energy is required to "pull apart" a proton. The collider basically mimics that very early more energetic universe through the use of the high-speed collision. Basically, if you collide to protons together at lower speeds (lower energy) they will not break apart.

Check out this Link that shows what theoretical particles that can only exist inside the high-energy very early universe. If physicists ever want to detect these particles, they need to use high energy to do so.

By the way... the forces we know today (electromagnetic force, gravitational force, strong and weak nuclear forces), were thought to be different in the high-energy one-second-old universe. Physicist hope to see these fundamental forces, also.


[edit on 4/4/2010 by Soylent Green Is People]

[edit on 4/4/2010 by Soylent Green Is People]




posted on Apr, 4 2010 @ 10:38 AM
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I have seen the videos of how the LHC works and am quite amazed by it. Since the 1940 technology has moved so far forward it got me thinking.

Maybe the design for the LHC was left with us by an ancient alien civilization as they use this process to create worm holes and travel from universe to universe. They deliberately left it here in the knowledge that one day mankind would one day get it going. When we actually do we will then visit the very species that gave us this idea. They will visit us and gauge if we are ready to ascend to a type 1 civilization.

Unfortunely they will see the wars and divisions here, destroy the LHC and tell us to come back in another thousand years once we fix up.

Just my theory



posted on Apr, 4 2010 @ 11:38 AM
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Originally posted by No Retreat No Surrender
I have seen the videos of how the LHC works and am quite amazed by it. Since the 1940 technology has moved so far forward it got me thinking.

Maybe the design for the LHC was left with us by an ancient alien civilization as they use this process to create worm holes and travel from universe to universe. They deliberately left it here in the knowledge that one day mankind would one day get it going. When we actually do we will then visit the very species that gave us this idea. They will visit us and gauge if we are ready to ascend to a type 1 civilization.

Unfortunely they will see the wars and divisions here, destroy the LHC and tell us to come back in another thousand years once we fix up.

Just my theory


Nice...

Star. That was what I wanted. I understand how it works, and it is interesting, but the image of what is going on is misleading.
And I was looking for something a little more "fantastic" than the OS.

And the mystery surrounding it makes it ripe for all types of theories.

I like hearing the outlandish theories the best as long as someone tries to throw in some real science, because due to quantum improbability and that H guy's uncertainty principle, literally anything is possible.

And with the amount of energy produced by the LHC, anything being possible is taken to a new level.

Thanks for the reply.



posted on Apr, 4 2010 @ 11:48 AM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


Thank you highly for the reply, as I am learning a good bit about OS on the LHC, but I still think that saying "pulling matter apart" is misleading.

Matter being ripped apart at the point of creation is a consequence of the massive amount of energy that is transformed into matter.

If finding the Higgs-Boson was as simple as smashing stuff, then we would have found it long ago.

We are good at smashing stuff.

But what they have to do is literally build up enough energy to create a powerful singular moment where "the object that gives us matter" can exist in within the structure of matter and be detected without destroying itself.

The logical paradox that exists with that problem alone is just too bizarre.

Another reason that this interest me, is that most of the rational theories that focus on possible outcomes at CERN are based particle (Einstein) physics.

Does anyone who believes in the "electric universe" theory have any ideas about the purpose of the LHC?



posted on Apr, 4 2010 @ 01:32 PM
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As brilliant as our physicists and cosmologists are, they still don't understand gravity. My theory is that once the so-called Higgs boson "imparted" mass to the universe, it's job was done, and it no longer exists, unless we might find them around the exit point of a white hole, where matter has been postulated to re-enter the universe somewhere. Maybe white holes exist in an anti-universe. Would you call them anti-Higgs bosons at that point? Who knows? Maybe what was left over from the Higgs is dark matter or dark energy. In a sense, it's like approaching zero...you can keep getting smaller and smaller but you never get there. The quarks have quarks, and the quarks quarks have quarks. As impossibly large as universes are, shouldn't they be equally as small in the other direction?



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 09:09 AM
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I think you are confusing the meaning of "CREATION", the mere word is misleading, because originates in a time with a cosmovision that was very different from the one we have today.
Today, to "create" in phisical terms means something like "modulating"or "assembling".
It's like art, no one "creates" a new colour, a new frequency of sonic reverberance, creation is about arrangement, about harmony.

So yes, they are, like you say, "creating" quarks, because they are ARRANGING their inmediate environment so that particular state of being arises.

I agree it's a tad confusing, but what you see as different explanations are just sides, or points of view.

Very interesting subject, btw.

PS: Soylent Green: i'm really enjoying your posts about this subject, if you find something to add about what i said i'd be very pleased.

Drakus



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 01:16 PM
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reply to post by drakus
 


yes...

I am beginning to think that you are 110% spot on the money.

It's like I say to-may-to and

someone else may say to-mah-to.

Like I said, my intention was to clear up, or at least attempt to clear up, what exactly is happening at the LHC.

Soylent Green's post's were HIGHLY informative as well.
I am stoked to read them, and I am understanding the LHC much better than previously.

I just see so many threads discussing the LHC and whacked out theories, and very little science, and I wanted to attempt to shed some light, so to speak, on CERN.



posted on Apr, 5 2010 @ 01:19 PM
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Originally posted by deadred
As brilliant as our physicists and cosmologists are, they still don't understand gravity. My theory is that once the so-called Higgs boson "imparted" mass to the universe, it's job was done, and it no longer exists, unless we might find them around the exit point of a white hole, where matter has been postulated to re-enter the universe somewhere. Maybe white holes exist in an anti-universe. Would you call them anti-Higgs bosons at that point? Who knows? Maybe what was left over from the Higgs is dark matter or dark energy. In a sense, it's like approaching zero...you can keep getting smaller and smaller but you never get there. The quarks have quarks, and the quarks quarks have quarks. As impossibly large as universes are, shouldn't they be equally as small in the other direction?


That is interesting. It dissipates when it imparts matter, so we see matter as the residual effect of the Higgs-Boson.
But never the particle itself.

Great theory.

Star.



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