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Astronomers Find 90% More Universe!

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posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 02:01 AM
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Astronomers Find 90% More Universe!


www.universetoday.com

Astronomers have long known that many surveys of distant galaxies miss 90% of their targets, but they didn't know why. Now, astronomers have determined that a large fraction of galaxies whose light took 10 billion years to reach us have gone undiscovered.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 02:01 AM
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We Should Dismiss “Dark matter” and M-Theory.
Written by P.Martone


For decades Science has been unable to accurately explain where 90% of the mass in the Universe is. Cosmologists and Theoretical Quantum Physicists have developed one elaborate theory after another to compensate for this “missing” mass. With a simple change in how we observe the Universe it has been revealed that for decades we simply did not perceive 90% of the energy emitted by these “missing Galaxies, gas and dust clouds” with mass that “Dark Matter” and “M-Theory” (A function of String Theory) were substitutes for. With these “missing” Galaxies, gas and dust clouds now observable, we can lay down complex, abstract and incorrect theories that fail to accurately model the Mechanical Universe.

This underscores a fundamental flaw in Physics. The flaw is a lack of understanding of how and why gravity works. Gravity as a force has been identified, measurements made and accurate predictions of its effect(s) have been developed. Because of this we keep making a fundamental mistake that has ramifications in Science and Academia. We allow side stepping of the fact that we do not have a full and complete understanding of gravity and why it works and emphasize only that it works, allowing Scientists to postulate one wrong theory after the other and incorporate them into our collective (mis)understanding of the Universe.


www.universetoday.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 31-3-2010 by n1gm4t1c]

[edit on 31-3-2010 by n1gm4t1c]

[edit on 31-3-2010 by n1gm4t1c]

[edit on 31-3-2010 by n1gm4t1c]



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 02:19 AM
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Bonus Pack

Thank goodness! It was starting to get a bit crowded.*


What we already know is pretty mind-blowing. What's even more mind-blowing is the way what we don't know keeps trickling in.

Truly, we live in a magnificent place.






* Actually, the article's implication is that the universe is about 90% more crowded than we previously knew, but I still thought it was a good joke.



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 03:03 AM
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reply to post by n1gm4t1c
 


Wowzah! That's amazing, thanks for posting this. So now every theory out there that tried to explain this missing matter in our universe will just be thrown out the window because we just found the rest of the mass in the other 90% of the universe we couldn't see before! Crazy and thought provoking stuff...



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 03:11 AM
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I have a question. This may reveal my lack of academic knowledge, but curiosity is the first step to learning, after all.

When scientists speak of a percentage of mass in the universe, are they referring to an abstract sum of mass, or is there a finite estimate for the actual mass in the universe? i.e. Is it an accepted axiom yet that there is a finite amount of mass and energy ejected from the Big Bang into our physical universe, or is it allowed that perhaps that quantity (and the scope of the universe itself) is infinite?



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 03:18 AM
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[edit on 31-3-2010 by n1gm4t1c]



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 03:38 AM
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reply to post by n1gm4t1c
 


There may be something wrong with my browser, but it looks like you quoted me and the actual reply was omitted somehow. Sorry if I'm missing something. And I apologize for the short and non-contributing reply to this. I am just confused lol. Thanks for your reply if there is one there I'm not seeing.



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 03:47 AM
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For man the universe is finite. Man has a finite existence and can only observe the universe as a finite creature. Only the infinite can observe infinity.

[edit on 31-3-2010 by n1gm4t1c]

[edit on 31-3-2010 by n1gm4t1c]



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 03:54 AM
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Thanks for your reply.

What I'm getting at is, do physicists believe that the physical mass of the universe has a finite quantity? Or do they believe that it extends outward forever? We always talk about the "visible universe," but that's limited by how far light has traveled to us thus far. What I'm wondering is: do physicists postulate that there is more beyond that, and how much more?



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 03:56 AM
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Originally posted by CHA0S
reply to post by n1gm4t1c
 


Wowzah! That's amazing, thanks for posting this. So now every theory out there that tried to explain this missing matter in our universe will just be thrown out the window


I don't think that is what this article is saying. It actually has nothing to do with Dark Matter or Energy.


Astronomers have long known that many surveys of distant galaxies miss 90% of their targets, but they didn't know why.Now, astronomers have determined that a large fraction of galaxies whose light took 10 billion years to reach us have gone undiscovered.


This quote says it all. They knew that these distant galaxies were out there, but they didn't know why their telescopes couldn't see them.

It was because the telescopes were looking for Lyman-alpha light and

most of the Lyman-alpha light is trapped within the galaxy that emits it, and 90% of galaxies do not show up in Lyman-alpha surveys.


Yes! This will change our understanding of cosmology but it won't effect Dark Matter or Energy theory at all ... that stuff is still (maybe) out there



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 04:29 AM
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NO mass, is also an amount, namely 0.

So ther IS mass, namely 0 mass.

Nothing is also a figure



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 07:54 AM
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Originally posted by Horza


Yes! This will change our understanding of cosmology but it won't effect Dark Matter or Energy theory at all ... that stuff is still (maybe) out there



But wasn't the missing 90% or so mass (whatever the figure) the reason that dark matter was 'invented'? Where does dark matter come in to it if we can account for most of the universe?

[edit on 31-3-2010 by Frakkerface]



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 07:41 PM
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Originally posted by AceWombat04
Thanks for your reply.

What I'm getting at is, do physicists believe that the physical mass of the universe has a finite quantity? Or do they believe that it extends outward forever? We always talk about the "visible universe," but that's limited by how far light has traveled to us thus far. What I'm wondering is: do physicists postulate that there is more beyond that, and how much more?


Good question and you might want to google "beyond the visible universe". Here is one such informative article that turned up for me:

www.newscientist.com...



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 08:57 PM
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reply to post by Frakkerface
 





But wasn't the missing 90% or so mass (whatever the figure) the reason that dark matter was 'invented'? Where does dark matter come in to it if we can account for most of the universe?


The other ten percent perhaps ? Thats a huge ten percent when it includes 'most' of the universe. Who knows.



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 10:38 PM
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reply to post by Frakkerface
 





But wasn't the missing 90% or so mass (whatever the figure) the reason that dark matter was 'invented'?


Short answer is: no.



Where does dark matter come in to it if we can account for most of the universe?


From the Wikipedia article on Dark Matter:


Dark matter was postulated by Fritz Zwicky in 1934, to account for evidence of "missing mass" in the orbital velocities of galaxies in clusters. Subsequently, other observations have indicated the presence of dark matter in the universe, including the rotational speeds of galaxies, gravitational lensing of background objects by galaxy clusters such as the Bullet Cluster, and the temperature distribution of hot gas in galaxies and clusters of galaxies.


In other words, DM is required to describe issues in galaxies we can already see, not substitute for galaxies we could not see (until recently).



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 10:49 PM
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I dont think in a 1000 years from now, that we will know how the universe really works.

2nd line probably because we would kill each other off before then...



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 10:50 PM
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reply to post by disfugured
 





The other ten percent perhaps ? Thats a huge ten percent when it includes 'most' of the universe. Who knows.


A little more info:

Estimated breakdown on the source of mass in the universe (from Wikipedia: Dark Energy


  • 0.4% Stars, planets, etc
  • 3.6% Interstellar Gas
  • 22% Dark Matter
  • 74% Dark Energy


So we are talking 90% of the 4% of 'regular matter' that makes up the universe - not 90% of the mass.

The article is describing how physicists understood that 4% of the universe was regular matter, but they couldn't see it all, but now the new methodology is showing them much more.



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 10:55 PM
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reply to post by n1gm4t1c
 


Um.... Who is P.Martone?

Your posted commentary 'appears' to be a snippit from the quoted news article but it is not. Is it in fact an extract from another article? If so you need to provide a link per the ATS T&C.

Neither the article nor the scientific paper it describes has anything to do with Dark Matter or M-Theory what-so-ever.

Please explain.

[edit on 31/3/2010 by rnaa]

[edit on 31/3/2010 by rnaa]



posted on Mar, 31 2010 @ 11:08 PM
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This thread should be titled "New and Improved Reality - Now With 90% More Universe!"


Interesting topic.



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