Wildfire reveals ancient neolithic monument

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posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 07:35 AM
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G'day ATS!

How cool is this, a wildfire on the North York Moors near Scarborough revealed the full extent of a neolithic enclosure and multiple cairns.

Moors give up ancient secret


ARCHAEOLOGISTS have snapped the first picture of an ancient monument on the North York Moors near Scarborough which could date back more than 4,500 years to neolithic times.

Aerial surveyors from English Heritage recently flew two sorties over moorland near Goathland after a wildfire swept across 62 acres revealing the full extent of a prehistoric stone enclosure and multiple stone cairns.


The sheer size of the feature is noteworthy!


However, it gave experts their first view of the scheduled monument which measures about 485ft by 246ft.




It makes you wonder what else could be buried underneath the thousands of hectares of bush, heath and forests across the world.

In September 2003 another wild fire close to where this one happened uncovered other archaeological objects.

English Heritage/Aerial Survey / Special Projects / Fylingdales Moor


The wild fire that raged across Fylingdales Moor, North Yorkshire, between the 17th and 21st of September 2003 devasted the vegetation and fragile peat soils of 2.4km2 of heather moorland, but in the process uncovered an archaeological landscape largely hidden by the heather for decades. Features revealed included prehistoric field systems and rock art, a network of leats associated with the Stoupe Brow alum quarry, and many earthworks left over from military training during the 1939-45 war. From the start this project has been one of collaboration and cooperation between partners, including the North York Moors National Park Authority, English Nature, DEFRA, English Heritage, The Strickland Estate and the Court Leet.

The link has much more, please read!

Among the awesome revelations was a neolithic carved stone:

The Megalith Portal


Archaeologists are pondering one of the most intriguing archaeological discoveries for some years after a fire revealed a unique carved stone thought to be 4,000 years old. The find came to light after a blaze in 2003 at Fylingdales near Whitby consumed two and a half square kilometres of heather moorland - before being brought under control by hundreds of fire fighters and a water-dumping helicopter.

However, in the fire’s aftermath archaeologists were astonished to find a vast array of archaeological remains – uncovered by the intensity of the blaze, which burnt away much of the peat.

"The fire had a devastating impact, but it also revealed an astonishing archaeological landscape," said Neil Redfern, English Heritage Inspector of Ancient Monuments.

"When we stepped over the scorched terrain and reviewed aerial photographs, we were confronted by a vast number of features we had no idea existed before. To find such well preserved signs of settlement and human activity over such a long period in such a small area is amazing."


Another reference to the stone mentioned:

Unique rock carving found amongst archaeology after moors fire


Archaeologists are pondering one of the most intriguing archaeological discoveries for some years after a fire revealed a unique carved stone thought to be 4,000 years old.

The find came to light after a blaze in 2003 at Fylingdales, near Whitby, consumed two and a half square kilometres of heather moorland before being brought under control by hundreds of firefighters and a water-dumping helicopter.

But of the many finds the most interesting and significant is the carved stone – adorned with a carved zigzag design around a central feature, which resembles an angular hour-glass.

Archaeologists believe the stone to be unique among examples of late Neolithic/Bronze Age rock art, which is usually dominated by curvilinear cup and ring marks. Instead, the designs on the stone recall those found on materials such as beaker pottery – opening up a wealth of interpretive possibilities.
PLEASE GO TO THE ARTICLE FOR MORE




I'm trying to find further images of the most recent discovery, as soon as do I'll post them!

All the best ATS!


BTW Thanks to member woodwytch for pointing me in the direction of some extra material!



[edit on 2-1-2010 by kiwifoot]




posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 07:45 AM
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Interesting stuff this Reveals Kiwifoot,
"It’s possible the cairns at the site near Goathland could be ‘gravestones’ for the ashes of folk who died thousands of years ago"
The name of this place is an indicater of past times, Me thinks



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 07:49 AM
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Originally posted by foxhoundone
Interesting stuff this Reveals Kiwifoot,
"It’s possible the cairns at the site near Goathland could be ‘gravestones’ for the ashes of folk who died thousands of years ago"
The name of this place is an indicater of past times, Me thinks


Yep, I'm struggling to find other images of this, they must have been held back to sell to a magazine or something.

Will keep trying, I love archaeology!



[edit on 2-1-2010 by kiwifoot]



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 09:06 AM
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when was this ment to happen because it is a bit cold and damp and wintery for wildfires in the uk at the moment



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 09:30 AM
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Originally posted by digby888
when was this ment to happen because it is a bit cold and damp and wintery for wildfires in the uk at the moment


Yeah seems like the wrong time of year!

BUT:


The blaze struck in early October, but caused no lasting damage to the environment.


I can't remember the weather back in October!!!

Do you?






posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 09:31 AM
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reply to post by digby888
 


The article says it happened sometime in October. I don't know if thats considered seasonal for wildfires or not though. Either way its an interesting find. I wonder why the news took so long to get out? Is it normal for these types of things to take three months to get to print or web media?

Cool find either way.

EDIT: lol nevermind beaten to the punch on that one


[edit on 2-1-2010 by thebulldog]



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 10:13 AM
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reply to post by kiwifoot
 


Hey there kiwifoot ... this was discovered some time back now and it kept archaeologists busy for quite a while.

A similar thing happened about 5-6 yrs ago (not sure exact year) on the North Yorkshire Moors not too far from me ... when a wildfire burned the scrub and bracken to a deeper level than other fires, close to Fylingdales early warning station ... on the moors road to Whitby (the place where Bram Stoker had the ship carrying Dracula's coffin run aground).

On this occasion the fire exposed a stone slab (like the Rossetta Stone), with some unknown script on it ... news reports said that it pre-dated anything they'd ever found in the area before ... and to my knowledge it's still not been translated.


The discovery made me wonder about two things;


1/ How many other things lie buried beneath the moors ... (prior to being the moorland it is now, it was part of the Great Royal Forest Land that covered most of the country and was hunted in by Henry VIII).


2/ Is the early warning station really just that ... or is there more to this piece of wilderness (that has MOD trespass notices in place for an area far bigger than the warning station itself) than meets the eye.


(other indirect points of interest);

1/ An ABC (alien big cat) was shot by police in the very same area within a year or so of this discovery. Then surprise surprise ... it was hushed up (after being reported in local newspapers (very Roswellesque)

2/ Goathland is where the village scenes of the tv series 'Heartbeat' are filmed


If you click on the link to my website (in my signature below this post) and go to the 'photo gallery', you will see a few pictures of the moors in question and the Fylingdale early warning station ...

Woody



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 11:35 AM
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I would like to see the pictures... but the last thing
I want is to sign up to see them.



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 11:39 AM
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The archeologist in the articles thinks this may be a neolithic grave site, if that's the case this was a long standing settlement, judging by the size of the grave site.



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 12:34 PM
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Originally posted by AlternateEnding
I would like to see the pictures... but the last thing
I want is to sign up to see them.



A tad overly dramatic maybe but no problem ... my post was directed to kiwifoot in case (s)he wanted to see the area (s)he'd written about ... it wasn't a compulsary order for all veiwers of the thread to check the pics out.

Sorry if I inadvertantley upset you !

Woody



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 01:40 PM
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Originally posted by woodwytch
reply to post by kiwifoot
 



A similar thing happened about 5-6 yrs ago (not sure exact year) on the North Yorkshire Moors not too far from me ... when a wildfire burned the scrub and bracken to a deeper level than other fires, close to Fylingdales early warning station ...


Hey Woody, thanks for the awesome info!

I found a bit more about that previous fire and the trasures it revealed while trying to find more on this one!

English Heritage/Aerial Survey / Special Projects / Fylingdales Moor


The wild fire that raged across Fylingdales Moor, North Yorkshire, between the 17th and 21st of September 2003 devasted the vegetation and fragile peat soils of 2.4km2 of heather moorland, but in the process uncovered an archaeological landscape largely hidden by the heather for decades. Features revealed included prehistoric field systems and rock art, a network of leats associated with the Stoupe Brow alum quarry, and many earthworks left over from military training during the 1939-45 war. From the start this project has been one of collaboration and cooperation between partners, including the North York Moors National Park Authority, English Nature, DEFRA, English Heritage, The Strickland Estate and the Court Leet.


The link has much more, please read!


On this occasion the fire exposed a stone slab (like the Rossetta Stone), with some unknown script on it ... news reports said that it pre-dated anything they'd ever found in the area before ... and to my knowledge it's still not been translated.


The Megalith Portal


Archaeologists are pondering one of the most intriguing archaeological discoveries for some years after a fire revealed a unique carved stone thought to be 4,000 years old. The find came to light after a blaze in 2003 at Fylingdales near Whitby consumed two and a half square kilometres of heather moorland - before being brought under control by hundreds of fire fighters and a water-dumping helicopter.

However, in the fire’s aftermath archaeologists were astonished to find a vast array of archaeological remains – uncovered by the intensity of the blaze, which burnt away much of the peat.

"The fire had a devastating impact, but it also revealed an astonishing archaeological landscape," said Neil Redfern, English Heritage Inspector of Ancient Monuments.

"When we stepped over the scorched terrain and reviewed aerial photographs, we were confronted by a vast number of features we had no idea existed before. To find such well preserved signs of settlement and human activity over such a long period in such a small area is amazing."


Another reference to the stone you mentioned:

Unique rock carving found amongst archaeology after moors fire


Archaeologists are pondering one of the most intriguing archaeological discoveries for some years after a fire revealed a unique carved stone thought to be 4,000 years old.

The find came to light after a blaze in 2003 at Fylingdales, near Whitby, consumed two and a half square kilometres of heather moorland before being brought under control by hundreds of firefighters and a water-dumping helicopter.

But of the many finds the most interesting and significant is the carved stone – adorned with a carved zigzag design around a central feature, which resembles an angular hour-glass.

Archaeologists believe the stone to be unique among examples of late Neolithic/Bronze Age rock art, which is usually dominated by curvilinear cup and ring marks. Instead, the designs on the stone recall those found on materials such as beaker pottery – opening up a wealth of interpretive possibilities.
PLEASE GO TO THE ARTICLE FOR MORE





1/ How many other things lie buried beneath the moors ... (prior to being the moorland it is now, it was part of the Great Royal Forest Land that covered most of the country and was hunted in by Henry VIII).


Me too:


It makes you wonder what else could be buried underneath the thousands of hectares of bush, heath and forests across the world.



2/ Is the early warning station really just that ... or is there more to this piece of wilderness (that has MOD trespass notices in place for an area far bigger than the warning station itself) than meets the eye.


Ahh good work, bring a little conspiracy into play, I hope so, as a wannabe Indiana Jones I'd lke this to be true!



(other indirect points of interest);

1/ An ABC (alien big cat) was shot by police in the very same area within a year or so of this discovery. Then surprise surprise ... it was hushed up (after being reported in local newspapers (very Roswellesque)

2/ Goathland is where the village scenes of the tv series 'Heartbeat' are filmed


OK mate, now your just selling your home town, do you own a B&B or something!




If you click on the link to my website (in my signature below this post) and go to the 'photo gallery', you will see a few pictures of the moors in question and the Fylingdale early warning station ...


Nice one mate, I will do! You're lucky, you live in a beautiful part of the world.

All the best, Kiwifoot!

PS, If you don't mind I'll add this extra info to the OP?



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 03:07 PM
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reply to post by kiwifoot
 


'Do you own a B&B or something' ?



No my friend I just absolutely love where I live ... to me it is paradise.

But if ever you're passing through I'm sure I could rustle up some coffee.


And if the therapy work dries up maybe I can get a job with the Yorkshire Tourist Board.

>>> add away

Woody

[edit on 2-1-2010 by woodwytch]

[edit on 2-1-2010 by woodwytch]



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 05:20 PM
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Originally posted by woodwytch

But if ever you're passing through I'm sure I could rustle up some coffee.


And if the therapy work dries up maybe I can get a job with the Yorkshire Tourist Board.



Woody



That's a big thumbs up on both of those!

I really do wonder though what other amazing finds are buried in the UK.

I love thee fact that this country has such an amazing history going back thousands of years.

Of course everywhere does but there's something mystical regarding the England, Ireland and Scotland, I don't know!

All the best, Kiwifoot!

[edit on 2-1-2010 by kiwifoot]



posted on Jan, 2 2010 @ 07:04 PM
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reply to post by kiwifoot
 


I know exactly what you mean ... I love ancient history ... if I'm foraging on the beach near Whitby and I find a few fossils I get so excited ... just the very thought of holding something of such age gives me a real thrill.

I couldn't think of anything more exciting than being the female equivalent of Indiana Jones ... few years back I would have said Lara Croft ... but hey nobody stays young forever (not as perky as I once was).


I just love the adventure of antiquity.

Woody



posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 01:32 AM
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awesome find!

i sure would like to see a LARGER picture of that carved rock.



posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 03:02 AM
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Wood will already know North and East yorkshire are steeped in mystery. Posting links on AS is not my strong point but people interested should reach the great Yorkshire barrows. In particular [Willy Howe] a neolithic burial mound. I have been there many times and the place has an amazing atmosphere. It is associated with Hobs and fairies.
These and other ancient monuments are to be found on the Yorkshire wolds. Very close to willy howe is a place called Thwing. Thwing is famous for John of thwing who later became St John of bridlington. He was said to perform miracles. Close to thwing is Europe's most famous deserted village [warram percy] Here archaeologists found changes in human skull shape found know where else in the world.
Another village close by is Wold Newton, here a large meteor crashed to the earth in 1795 that is now in the british museum. This area is full of mystery, lots of people report seeing ufos on the East yorkshire wolds and my web site www.ILFUFO.com has many reports.
So to read the Scarborough's North Yorkshire moors have reviled this dose not surprise me.
Regards Paul



posted on Jan, 3 2010 @ 09:18 AM
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Originally posted by queenannie38
awesome find!

i sure would like to see a LARGER picture of that carved rock.


Mate I swear I'm trying, I do believe that the photos of the more recent flyover are being withheld, probably for sale to some publication or another, I'll keep looking though and post if I have any success! As for the carved rock, I'll keep looking too!



[edit on 3-1-2010 by kiwifoot]





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