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Chinese Archaeologists Discover Legendary Tomb of Cao Cao

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posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 11:22 AM
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Chinese Archaeologists Discover Legendary Tomb of Cao Cao


www.foxnews.com

BEIJING — Chinese archeologists have unearthed a large third-century tomb, which they say could be that of Cao Cao, the legendary politician and general famous throughout East Asia for his Machiavellian tactics.

The tomb, discovered in Xigaoxue village near the ancient Chinese city of Anyang, Henan Province, has an epitaph and inscription that appear to refer to Cao Cao, Central China Television said on Sunday.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 11:22 AM
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I haven't heard of this politician before this article, but based on the description of his behavior, maybe they should make a movie about him on Discovery channel or something.

I think this is a fascinating find. It is amazing how much we have built in the past, only to have it lost over the years. How much is still out there?

www.foxnews.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 11:38 AM
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They already made a series of games that pertain to him, Dynasty Warriors and Romance of the Three Kingdoms in which he is a central character.

This is stunning news for the archeological field and I'm glad they were finally able to find it.



posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 11:43 AM
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I love threads like this, they inspire me to learn more about other cultures and their histories.

Here is a qoute from wikipedia about the posthumously titled "Emperor Wu of Wei":

"Cao Cao was known for his craftiness as an adolescent. According to the Biography of Cao Man, Cao Cao's uncle often complained to Cao Song about Cao Cao's indulgence in hunting and music with Yuan Shao. In retaliation, Cao Cao feigned a fit before his uncle one day, who immediately rushed to inform Cao Song. When Cao Song went to see his son, Cao Cao behaved normally. When asked, Cao Cao replied, "I have never had a fit, but I lost the love of my uncle, and therefore he had deceived you." Henceforth, Cao Song ceased to believe the words of his brother regarding Cao Cao, and thus Cao Cao became even more blatant and perseverant in his wayward pursuits."


edit to provide source link: en.wikipedia.org...

[edit on 28-12-2009 by DizzyDayDream]

[edit on 28-12-2009 by DizzyDayDream]



posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 12:04 PM
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I will be having to learn a little more about him also.
I also think this is a good find. Will want to see what they find in the tomb. This also makes me think about Gan Kahn. If they might find his tomb some time also.



posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 12:07 PM
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I understand that they learn alot about the era that pertains to a tomb...

I just can't help but think it's ever so slightly disrespectful... Disturbing their eternal rest so to speak...

It's a minor bother, but one that should be taken into account.



posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 12:15 PM
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reply to post by seagull
 


Thanks


I never thought of it like that
I mean the moral aspect of Archaeology

Interesting!



posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 12:20 PM
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reply to post by ModernAcademia
 


It's a concern that I feel hasn't, and isn't, always looked at. The history of archeology, while endlessly fascinating, is rife with episodes of disrespect.

Ethics in science is very important. IMHO.

Edited for proper grammar...or as proper as an American gets
.

[edit on 12/28/2009 by seagull]



posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 12:49 PM
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reply to post by seagull
 


I read on wikipedia, which also details the recent discovery of his tomb, that it was discovered during some sort small scale mining dig, but it wasnt taken seriously until AFTER the tomb had been looted, and the inscriptions on some looted tablets revealed the true identity of the tomb dweller(s).

So in some ways i agree seagull, that opening up someones tomb for the sake of historical curiousity is a little disrespectful. Because in a way it does suggest their traditions and ceremonial rites of passage such as death are of less value than our collection of facts and data about them as people. I mean its likely youll get arrested for digging up the grave of say your great great great uncle (if an old family legend has been passed down to you saying how he was buried with some sort of family treasure - and you were desperate for money, and he wouldnt mind your sure). Whereas, digging up an ancient burial ground, where you find millions of dollars worth of gold, suddenly means your an archeologist, and a very rich one at that!

anyway my original point was going to be that i think its far more suitable for an archeologist or someone with a genuine interest in what they've discovered to profit from tomb discovery than any old looters from the local community where those treasures and parts of our cultural history will probably be lost forever.



posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 01:16 PM
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Most digs are very respectful of the site.
There should always be a difference between anthropologists and looters.

The initial emperor of China, the famed Qin, who had the terracotta army, his grave site has been found but has yet to be opened.



posted on Dec, 28 2009 @ 01:27 PM
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reply to post by RuneSpider
 


They do the best they can to be respectful, I know...

It's still the way I feel on the issue, but some leeway must be granted, I suppose, if we're to learn anything at all... But I don't have to like it
.



posted on Dec, 29 2009 @ 07:25 PM
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Wow !! Please excuse my over excitement but I was / am a HUGE FAN of the Romance of the 3 Kingdoms video game series !! It goes without saying that I always picked Cao Cao as my character



posted on Jan, 7 2010 @ 10:03 PM
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I never thought I would find this topic on ATS. The Three Kingdoms came about after the Han dynasty fell and China was divided into three sections. Cao Cao basically held Northern China and with it the Han heir captive for protective reasons after the division. Cao Cao was a skillful tactician and often times a great coward. He never faced his enemies ever in combat. Cao Cao died never to see his vision of a unified China under his rule. His son Cao Pi was able to fulfill his fathers dreams but died a short time after his father thus paving the way for the Jin dynasty.



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