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Inmates rescue deputy from another inmate

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posted on Nov, 6 2009 @ 08:35 AM
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64 year old Dep. Moon was sitting at his desk in the Hillsbourough County FL jail when an inmate much larger and younger than him suddenly put him in a choke hold.

This type of hold is called a "rear naked choke" and can be fatal if applied long enough.

His rescuers were an unlikely bunch. Not his fellow deputies, but other inmates in for charges such as home invasion, drug trafficing and attempted murder. They were the ones who came running to his aid and called for backup.

When asked why they did it their answer was simple - he was a good guy and they liked him.

Inmates Save Deputy

Edit to add a bit more - evidently someone new took over running the county jails around a year ago.

I'm not sure what he's doing, but he is evidently doing something right. Inmates attacks on guards have fallen by 60% and it seems at least in this case the majority of the inmates had good will toward the guard..

He says this is the secret...


"The response of the other inmates in this case I think speaks volumes as to the fact that we treat these men and women that are held in our facilities with a lot of respect," Previtera said.


From another local source...

Bay News 9 - Inmates rescue deputy








[edit on 6-11-2009 by Frogs]




posted on Nov, 6 2009 @ 09:08 AM
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reply to post by Frogs
 


It is good to see some inmates still have some semblance of conscious. Maybe they can get some sort of reward while they serve their time. I would still like to see them serve their time though. Maybe this can show that these few inmates can be rehabilited.

I guess a few can change.

On the other side if you are going to be a prison guard this shows that it is wise not to make enemies while doing so. Treat the inmates fair and nice and someday maybe they will repay you by saving your life.

Raist



posted on Nov, 6 2009 @ 09:34 AM
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I belive the actions of the inmates will be "taken into account" according to the article.

My guess is that in cop / lawyer speak that may mean a lighter sentance or better conditions for them.

From what I've gleaned from the articles I've read about this the secret seems to be - he treated the inmates with as much respect as his job would allow him to. They respected him in turn and thus came to his aid when he was attacked.

I think there is a lesson to be learned there...



posted on Nov, 6 2009 @ 09:46 AM
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reply to post by Raist
 


Even in the most extreme examples of sociopath there is always some sort of 'code of conduct' in their minds. It's cool that these guys came to the aid of this individual for whatever reason but thinking "hey he's a nice guy and I don't think he should be killed" based on that individuals standards doesnt erase the fact that in that same head at some point for some reason the line "I've decided that this house is okay to invade and that the occupants therein are perfectly acceptable targets to terrorize."

Some skin-eating child-rapist might one day help and old lady across the street scout-style. Once on the other-side of the street he's still a skin-eating child-rapist.

Special consideration and pointing out why the special consideration is being made is worth a try. Punishment doesnt work with criminals. Many of them see the punishment as a good thing as it justifies their existence and lends to the rep and street-cred factors. So it's not like a chance at special consideration could make anything worse. But I wouldnt be surprised if upon release all of these morons are right back in within a couple months.



posted on Nov, 6 2009 @ 11:41 AM
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Ive worked as a Corrections Deputy, and I want to know why this guard wasnt paying attention to where the inmates were around him. You never let an inmate behind you unchecked. Sounds to me like the guard was slipping, maybe a little to relaxed from giving the inmates "respect". I dont believe its wrong to treat inmates with respect, but you also have to respect the fact that they are criminals and cannot be trusted. If they could handle the responsibility of trust, then they wouldnt be in jail/prison in the first place IMO.



posted on Nov, 6 2009 @ 11:49 AM
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reply to post by treemanx
 


Yes and no. As Corrections workers one is in a position of custody. We are not judges. I treat ALL inmate with respect until I have reason to not respect them. It works. We had this new gung ho CO one day and he was following me around with my crew. I asked if he didn't trust my ability. He said that he was there for back up. I told him, "I've got all the back up I need with my crew. Right Billy?" Billy, a lifer nodded.

This doesn't surprise me at all. There's plenty of dicks in Corrections and those that aren't are generally treated with respect from the inmates. That said, one always should watch their back.



posted on Nov, 6 2009 @ 12:08 PM
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Originally posted by intrepid
reply to post by treemanx
 


Yes and no. As Corrections workers one is in a position of custody. We are not judges. I treat ALL inmate with respect until I have reason to not respect them. It works. We had this new gung ho CO one day and he was following me around with my crew. I asked if he didn't trust my ability. He said that he was there for back up. I told him, "I've got all the back up I need with my crew. Right Billy?" Billy, a lifer nodded.

This doesn't surprise me at all. There's plenty of dicks in Corrections and those that aren't are generally treated with respect from the inmates. That said, one always should watch their back.



I didnt say Corrections guards shouldnt show respect to the inmates. It isnt the responsibility of the guard to harass or degrade anyone.

Its my opinion, though, that as Corrections workers, their "guard" so to speak should not be dropped for one instant. Even if they have a rapport with the inmates. They still need to pay attention to every move, and never let an inmate work his way around to your vulnerable back side without you keeping an eye on him at all times.

This is a basic concept that is universally known throughout all facets of law enforcement.



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 02:12 AM
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It sounds all nice and fluffy, but they had a motive for helping the officer out. I have friends in FL law enforcement and DOC, and know that they reduce the sentience of a prisoner if he helps a detention deputy or DOC officer who is attacked by another inmate.



posted on Nov, 21 2009 @ 08:07 PM
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This isn't unusual. I'm a Corrections Officer and not only have I witnessed inmates coming to the aid of an officer but they have come to my aid. If you treat them with dignity and respect you'll get it back. No, it doesn't change the fact they are convicted felons and will likely repeat offend but in the vast majority of people there is something inside that is good and decent.

It's true that we should always watch our backs but it isn't always possible when working a living unit to keep inmates from coming up behind you.




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