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Electricty Blows Up Tree (Caution Language)

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posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 04:34 PM
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Never before have I seen such an instant release of energy from a power line.

This is amazing, skip to about a minute and thirty seconds if your not patient enough.

Make sure you watch it till the end.

As mentioned in the title, there is a little bit of language in this, not to much, just the response you would expect from seeing something like this.

(click to open player in new window)


Thankfully no one was close.



[edit on 10/10/2009 by Alaskan Man]




posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 04:49 PM
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To be expected, surely?

The tree was swaying in the wind, touches the lines and *zap", gets fried.

I assume your posting this out of general interest, rather than hinting something nefarious at work?



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 05:01 PM
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actually, it is interesting to see the electricity work its way down the tree over the course of the film, small amounts of the high voltage would cause the normally insulating wood and fibers into carbon ash, traveling along the moisture of the tree. once enough of the current made a good ground pathway to the surface... BAMF! followed by the complete ground and thus no more fire, something must haev tripped.

watch the smoke plumes as they get lower and lower on the tree... fascinating to watch, bad luck for the tree



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 05:06 PM
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.

[edit on 10/10/2009 by Alaskan Man]



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 05:22 PM
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reply to post by wx4caster
 


The fire is caused by the high resistance of the tree to the current. If there was no path to ground, then current wouldn't flow to begin with.



posted on Oct, 10 2009 @ 09:41 PM
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reply to post by stumason
 


yeah thats what i said, only i said "good groud" eventually, as in a much less resistant cunductive path.

just remember an indian sees an eagle over the river.

or i=e/r



posted on Oct, 11 2009 @ 05:40 AM
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How many units of electricity was lost? Serious.

Such a heavy flow of current would have resulted in severe drop in currents in lines and blown the fuses in the transformer. Why didnt the power trip in the first place?



posted on Oct, 11 2009 @ 01:49 PM
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reply to post by wx4caster
 




just remember an indian sees an eagle over the river.


I like that one.


If e = v, then I agree.




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