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**Full Moon Earthquake Doom**

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posted on Oct, 3 2009 @ 02:41 PM
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It seems to me like we are in a global earthquake swarm. We have had some huge deadly quakes lately.

www.iris.edu...

Here is a massive earthquake swarm at the Long Valley Caldera in Ca. which happens to be a super volcano.

earthquake.usgs.gov...

earthquake.usgs.gov...

quake.wr.usgs.gov...

4.1 in Colorado today

earthquake.usgs.gov...
..




posted on Oct, 3 2009 @ 02:44 PM
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earthquake.usgs.gov...

Oh man, it was New Mexico! My own earthquake free state, has been struck. While I wasn't paying attention!!



posted on Oct, 3 2009 @ 03:00 PM
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Just waiting as I don't feel all this shaking is done quite yet. I still feel that there is going to be another biggie coming soon.



posted on Oct, 3 2009 @ 03:03 PM
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I would love to hear more about your theory regarding correlation between quakes and a full moon.



posted on Oct, 3 2009 @ 03:08 PM
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Originally posted by worldwatcher
I would love to hear more about your theory regarding correlation between quakes and a full moon.


I think he may have meant it as a figure of speech?



posted on Oct, 3 2009 @ 03:32 PM
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reply to post by tempesillest
 


No not at all, Quakes happen just before and after the full moon as shown with the large ones this week in Samoa and Indonesia.

Long Valley rumbling is scary, If that one blows then Crater lake will right along with it. Nothing would survive that. As we inch closer to the solar maximum don't be surprised by the number and size of the quakes.

God is mad and he is going to teach the non-believers a lesson.



posted on Oct, 3 2009 @ 03:38 PM
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reply to post by worldwatcher
 


The gravitational pull from the moon is what causes the tides in the earths oceans to rise and fall.

The moon also doesn't go around the earth in a perfect circle, its orbit is somewhat elliptical.

Since the plates that make up the earth's crust are "floating" on top of a liquid sea of lava, that gravity could have some influence.

It seems logical that a little less pressure on one side of a plate boundary or fault-line, that was about to snap anyway, could trigger the slip.

Can the Moon Cause Earthquakes?


The Earth and moon are closest together—at perigee—once a month. The Earth and sun are closest together—at perihelion—once a year. Perihelion currently occurs in early January. Maximum gravitation force occurs when a syzygy and perigee occur on the same day as perihelion.

According to Berkland, seismometers left on the moon by Apollo astronauts show that moonquakes occur most frequently at perigee.

"So we know Earth's gravity triggers moonquakes. I don't think any scientist disputes that," Berkland said. "When I learned that, I went to my former [U.S. Geological Survey] colleagues in Menlo Park [California] and pointed out this really exists, so what's so difficult about turning it around?"

According to Berkland, the U.S. Geological Survey said such a theory is ridiculous—the Earth is 82 times more massive than the moon. Though the Earth can trigger quakes on the moon, they said, the moon is too small to trigger any earthquakes.

But the moon is mostly solid and lacks a liquid core like the Earth, Berkland said. The Earth "is an active, living planet, and so it is not at all surprising that minor gravitational stresses can trigger earthquakes," he said.



edit to add: Perhaps "full moon" isn't the best way to describe it, since most will relate it to what we're seeing from the ground when the earth isn't blocking light from the sun on the moon's surface.

[edit on 3-10-2009 by lernmore]



posted on Oct, 3 2009 @ 03:54 PM
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reply to post by worldwatcher
 




"Syzygy" refers to the alignment of three celestial objects. Syzygy of the sun, Earth, and moon occur twice a month, at the full and new moons. At such times, gravitational forces are at a maximum, especially when the bodies are close together, Berkland said.
"

news.nationalgeographic.com...

The big 9.? that caused the Sumatra Tsunami happened during a full moon.

Chances are biggest for big quakes during a full or new moon. Like we are in right now. And there have been a lot of quakes in the last few days.

[edit on 3-10-2009 by downtown436]



posted on Oct, 3 2009 @ 04:17 PM
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The gravitational pull of the moon is no greater when it's full, it's just its positioning in the sky in relation (its in a locked orbit remember thats why we only see one side of it) to the position of the sun // earth. A new moon, gibbous, half or whatever moon it decides to be has the same gravitational pull. I'm not saying the moon doesn't affect earthquakes, it might, but it's nothing to do with its phase.


Edit: Completly ignore most of what I just said, i am a silly individual who should research stuff before he posts.


[edit on 3/10/09 by woogleuk]



posted on Oct, 3 2009 @ 04:28 PM
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Originally posted by woogleuk
Don't be silly, the gravitational pull of the moon is no greater when it's full, it's just its positioning in the sky in relation (its in a locked orbit remember thats why we only see one side of it) to the position of the sun // earth. Believe me when I say that a new moon, gibbous, half or whatever moon it decides to be has the same gravitational pull. I'm not saying the moon doesn't affect earthquakes, it might, but it's nothing to do with its phase.


MMM Your wrong. Tides are ever more drastic during a full moon, Hence the pull is more.



posted on Oct, 3 2009 @ 04:36 PM
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Originally posted by woogleuk
Believe me when I say that a new moon, gibbous, half or whatever moon it decides to be has the same gravitational pull.


What you're failing to realize, is that the moon does NOT always have the same gravitational pull..

The distance from the earth to the moon causes it to fluctuate. That's why sometimes the tide is only 4.5 feet, and other times it's 9 feet at its high point. Other planets lined up may also may account for a slightly increased pull in that direction.

While it's just a coincidence that these occur near full/new moons, the truth is that it does, in fact change.






oops, typo fixed

[edit on 3-10-2009 by lernmore]



posted on Oct, 3 2009 @ 04:36 PM
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reply to post by Sky watcher
 


yes your right I am wrong (and i feel silly), sort of..

Spring Tides
When the moon is full or new, the gravitational pull of the moon and sun are combined. At these times, the high tides are very high and the low tides are very low. This is known as a spring high tide. Spring tides are especially strong tides (they do not have anything to do with the season Spring). They occur when the Earth, the Sun, and the Moon are in a line. The gravitational forces of the Moon and the Sun both contribute to the tides. Spring tides occur during the full moon and the new moon.

Neap Tides
During the moon's quarter phases the sun and moon work at right angles, causing the bulges to cancel each other. The result is a smaller difference between high and low tides and is known as a neap tide. Neap tides are especially weak tides. They occur when the gravitational forces of the Moon and the Sun are perpendicular to one another (with respect to the Earth). Neap tides occur during quarter moons.

The Proxigean Spring Tide is a rare, unusually high tide. This very high tide occurs when the moon is both unusually close to the Earth (at its closest perigee, called the proxigee) and in the New Moon phase (when the Moon is between the Sun and the Earth). The proxigean spring tide occurs at most once every 1.5 years.


However in my defense, its not just the full moon which causes stronger tides, its a new moon as well, plus the suns gravity plays a part. :-p


[edit on 3/10/09 by woogleuk]



posted on Oct, 3 2009 @ 04:45 PM
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And i'll throw this in for good measure to make up for my silliness:

A Few Facts About Lunar Tides

* The gravitational force of the moon is one ten-millionth that of earth, but when you combine other forces such as the earth's centrifugal force created by its spin, you get tides.

* The sun's gravitational force on the earth is only 46 percent that of the moon. Making the moon the single most important factor for the creation of tides.

* The sun's gravity also produces tides. But since the forces are smaller, as compared to the moon, the effects are greatly decreased.

* Tides are not caused by the direct pull of the moon's gravity. The moon is pulling upwards on the water while the earth is pulling downward. Slight advantage to the moon and thus we have tides.

* Whenever the Moon, Earth and Sun are aligned, the gravitational pull of the sun adds to that of the moon causing maximum tides.

* Spring tides happen when the sun and moon are on the same side of the earth (New Moon) or when the sun and moon are on opposite sides of the earth (Full Moon).

* When the Moon is at first quarter or last quarter phase (meaning that it is located at right angles to the Earth-Sun line), the Sun and Moon interfere with each other in producing tidal bulges and tides are generally weaker; these are called neap tides.

* Spring tides and neap tide levels are about 20% higher or lower than average.

* Offshore, in the deep ocean, the difference in tides is usually less than 1.6 feet

* The surf grows when it approaches a beach, and the tide increases. In bays and estuaries, this effect is amplified. (In the Bay of Fundy, tides have a range of 44.6 ft.)

* The highest tides in the world are at the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia, Canada.

* Because the earth rotates on its axis the moon completes one orbit in our sky every 25 hours (Not to be confused with moon's 27 day orbit around the earth), we get two tidal peaks as well as two tidal troughs. These events are separated by about 12 hours.

* Since the moon moves around the Earth, it is not always in the same place at the same time each day. So, each day, the times for high and low tides change by 50 minutes.

* The type of gravitational force that causes tides is know as "Tractive" force.



posted on Oct, 7 2009 @ 09:14 PM
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Well, more megaquakes today. As the full moon wanes.....

earthquake.usgs.gov...

I count four serious quakes in the last 24 hours.



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