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Surveillance Camera Captures Orb Forming Out Of Nowhere?

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posted on Sep, 12 2009 @ 06:34 AM
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mittklipp.aftonbladet.se...

That is the question.

The incident happened in Lund, a small city in southern Sweden.

The person who posted the video, Henrik Lindskog, says:

"I work as a watchman in Lund and was temporarily assigned to surveil video cameras in an area where some things have been going on lately. What do you think it is?"

Henrik Lindskog claims that it is not a drop of rain, and that a dark spot forms on the ground below. I have a hard time seeing it, how about you?

[edit on 12-9-2009 by Heliocentric]




posted on Sep, 12 2009 @ 06:49 AM
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It's obviously a snowflake that lands on the lens and melts. You can see on the right upper corner that it's snowing heavily and the wind is pushing them almost vertical. Swedes obsessed with orbs lately?



posted on Sep, 12 2009 @ 06:55 AM
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reply to post by Heliocentric
 


very intresting indeed~! S&F for you. This looks seemingly eerily familiar to one of the shots in the Ghosts, Spirits, and Demons!! you tube video where a energy type 'orb' fades in and out



posted on Sep, 12 2009 @ 07:03 AM
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reply to post by Heliocentric
 


That's no snow flake. With the amount of snow falling in the upper right corner there would have been a number of flakes hitting the lens. If it was an isolated flake impact it would have slid down. A snow flake should have stayed frozen on the lens. If the lens was above freezing the flake should have stuck to the lens, melted and then slid down. The object looked liquid at first sight, moved about a bit in the same location and then evaporated into thin air. This is either CGI or the real deal.



posted on Sep, 12 2009 @ 07:10 AM
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Originally posted by lostinspace
reply to post by Heliocentric
 

If the lens was above freezing the flake should have stuck to the lens, melted and then slid down. The object looked liquid at first sight, moved about a bit in the same location and then evaporated into thin air. This is either CGI or the real deal.



You have to take into account that the flake is out of focus. It does melt and slid down but you can't see it clearly.



posted on Sep, 12 2009 @ 08:06 AM
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Originally posted by Heliocentric
Henrik Lindskog claims that it is not a drop of rain, and that a dark spot forms on the ground below. I have a hard time seeing it, how about you?


I guess a melted snowflake is technically not a drop of rain, so you could say he's correct that it's not a drop of rain.

I lived in snow country for years and what's more, I've worn ski goggles on the ski slopes, and that's exactly what the snow looked like when it hit my goggles and melted. (Sometimes snow melted when it hit my goggles, and sometimes it didn't, that depended on many factors).

Surveillance cameras have electronics which can generate heat so just like my ski goggles, I'm sure there are cases where the snow can hit the lens and not melt (if it's extremely cold and windy for example) and other conditions where it CAN melt on the lens (not quite as cold).

So 99.9999% chance it's a melted snowflake.

And to whoever says it's not, you could be right! Keep hanging on to that 0.0001% chance it could be something else!



posted on Sep, 12 2009 @ 08:20 AM
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I would say the odds are impossible to set, but that's just me.

The possibility that it is water cannot be excluded,

What intrigues me is that Lindskog claims that a dark spot forms under the object, which I interpret as a shadow from a manifest object. If so, the water drop theory can be excluded with 99.9999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999% certainty


I can't see it myself, but apparently Lindskog has the original recording, or a copy of it, so perhaps he sees something I don't



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