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Cinnamon Oil Kills Bacteria

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posted on Sep, 10 2009 @ 12:04 AM
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I just stumbled upon this article and found it informative and interesting. Just wanted to share it with you survivalist.

www.hpnonline.com...-9


In a country obsessed with germs and sickness, antibacterial soaps and sanitizers are becoming more and more common. But because such products contribute to the growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, some researchers recommend sanitizers made with cinnamon oil, which has been shown in many studies to have powerful antimicrobial properties. A recent study by a team of surgeons, for example, found that a solution made with cinnamon oil killed a number of common and hospital-acquired infections, like streptococcus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA. The study found it was just as effective as several antiseptics widely used in hospitals. Another study by French researchers in 2008 had similar results, showing that at concentrations of 10 percent or less, cinnamon oil was effective against Staphylococcus, E. coli and several antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria. Dr. Lawrence D. Rosen, a pediatrician in New Jersey who dispenses natural health advice on his blog, wholechildcenter.org, recommends a tried-and-true recipe for homemade hand sanitizer called thieves oil. “I add cinnamon bark, lemon oil and eucalyptus,” he said, adding, “The recipe goes back to the Middle Ages, where it was used by these thieves who would go around stealing jewelry from dead bodies, and they never got sick.” Cinnamon oil, when applied topically, is generally safe. But in some people it can cause an allergic reaction. THE BOTTOM LINE Cinnamon oil has antiseptic properties. ANAHAD O’CONNOR




posted on Sep, 10 2009 @ 12:54 AM
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reply to post by TrainDispatcher
 


There are quite a few other natural anti-biotics too, the most famous one is probably garlic. I'd recommend you look up "bee propolis" as well. Its a really fantastic anti-biotic!



posted on Sep, 10 2009 @ 12:59 AM
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Is it possible for me to concoct this cinammon oil?

With cinnamon bark or ground cinnamon?

I wouldn't mind having some of that stuff with me in the woods when I'm rockhounding!



posted on Sep, 10 2009 @ 05:37 AM
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You take a regular cooking oil.......like olive oil. Put cinnamon bark in the oil with other scents that you like or that have benefit....then bring to a boil then simmer. This makes the cinnamon oil. You need to test it first, it could cause a reaction.



posted on Sep, 10 2009 @ 08:03 PM
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Step 1 - Measure 1/2 cup of ground cinnamon and 2 cups of olive oil. Place these ingredients into a pan or pot. If you prefer to use cinnamon bark, use 5 to 10 sticks. Using cinnamon bark will make the oil more potent.

Step 2 - Set the stove top on medium to high heat. Place the pan on the burner. Allow the cinnamon to heat up for 3 to 5 minutes. The aroma of cinnamon should become potent as it simmers on the stove.

Step 3 - Turn off the stove. Allow the cinnamon oil to cool. After the oil has cooled, use a fine mesh strainer to filter out any ground cinnamon or parts of cinnamon bark that remain. Put a coffee filter in the strainer to ensure that you catch any left over debris.

Step 4 - Funnel the cinnamon oil into an amber colored glass jar or bottle. A darker bottle prevents light from damaging the oil, and it also preserves the oil for longer.

Step 5 - Store the cinnamon oil in the pantry where it is cool and dry. Place a dated label on the bottle or jar. You should keep it for no longer than a month.
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Recipe link

I wonder why the shelf life is so short?



posted on Sep, 10 2009 @ 08:17 PM
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reply to post by GioTheGreek
 


Use almond oil instead of olive and add 1 tablespoon of whole chamomile.
It will then last for over 6 months as the chamomile kills off and bacteria or fungi in the mix!

I always add chamomile to what ever tincture I am making as it helps to kill of anything that may taint it or shorten its shelf life.
Another thing to consider is the strength of the oil. To much of the cinnamon can cause some seriously bad skin problems/reactions. It isn't just hot and spicy to your tongue.



posted on Sep, 10 2009 @ 08:21 PM
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reply to post by xoxo stacie
 


Wow. Chamomile...

My grandmother used to drink chamomile and greek mountain tea every night... maybe that's why her "shelf life" was so long!

Thanks for the tip stacie



posted on Sep, 10 2009 @ 08:32 PM
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Chamomile? That's wonderful to know, and I don't even have to buy any! All i have is ground cinnamon, but I think i have seen the bark in the spice isle before.



posted on Sep, 10 2009 @ 10:42 PM
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Honey, is an antibacterial, and has been used as far back as the time of the Egyptians, if not prior.
Cinnamon and honey, now there's something I would take in a minute to calm a scratchy throat.
The hell with Robot-tussin!!



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 12:33 AM
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reply to post by reticledc
 


That does sound alot better than over the counter cough medicines...

Up here, we have Buckley's syrup.... which is absolute torture to drink, but it works! I compare it to taking a spoonful of Vicks. lol

Next time, its cinnamon and honey all day long



posted on Sep, 11 2009 @ 05:17 PM
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reply to post by GioTheGreek
 


I got some cinnamon stick today and brewed them up.
I stunk up the whole house, in a good way.
*~

[edit on 9/11/2009 by reticledc]



posted on Sep, 15 2009 @ 08:49 PM
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Originally posted by reticledc
Honey, is an antibacterial, and has been used as far back as the time of the Egyptians, if not prior.
Cinnamon and honey, now there's something I would take in a minute to calm a scratchy throat.
The hell with Robot-tussin!!


When honey is processed, it tends to granulate and clog up the machinery. So now they heat it up to a high temp, and kill off all the natural organisms in it. Like the anti-bacterial stuff. I have had dentists advise me not to use honey in my coffee, because it acts like coc aine does to people, on the cavity causing bacteria. But I buy mine from health-food stores, or from farmers, un'pasteurized'. That way, it kills those same bacteria. And 'paseurizing' milk has the same deleterious effect on milk. Kills all the good stuff your body needs. Microwaves do, as well.



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