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Ready to go bag for kiddos?

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posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 06:26 AM
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As I read and prepare notes for what Hubby would pack in his bag. I also have ideas about my bag.

We have six kiddos. The oldest four are teens then an almost teen and a little one.

I want to prepare each a backpack to carry.

We are gonna use them camping as well for fun and practice.

I was thinking each should have:
snacks
water
ID
Coloring Books, cards, puzzles, etc [age related]
Blanket
Change of clothes
small first aide stuff
the older ones have pocket knives so those would be ready

Do yall have any other suggestions?




posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 06:46 AM
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Actually, not telling you what to do, but I would suggest taking the puzzles and what not out of the bags. If these kids were to survive a true bug out situation, then they need to know what to carry and how to use it..

I would say that children wouldn't be having much of a child hood if SHTF. They would be a lot harder and more grown up, much like our grandparents when they were kids. Lot less smiles, more callouses.

I would however print up a useful teaching pack so that you can educate your children while you bug out. Tailor it to each child's age, and make sure you laminate it


[edit on 1-9-2009 by midnightbrigade]


CX

posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 06:56 AM
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Originally posted by midnightbrigade
Actually, not telling you what to do, but I would suggest taking the puzzles and what not out of the bags. If these kids were to survive a true bug out situation, then they need to know what to carry and how to use it..

I would say that children wouldn't be having much of a child hood if SHTF. They would be a lot harder and more grown up, much like our grandparents when they were kids. Lot less smiles, more callouses.


Thats a valid point, but even if SHTF there will be times when your are sat around with little to do, and the kids WILL need occupying. It's only my opinion but anything that will ease a crappy situation will be invaluable if you have kids.

You can still teach kids the essentials of surviving, and yes it will be a shock for them, but most parents know that if you can break it up with a bit of fun for the kid, the learning bits are more easily accepted by the kid.

Even though it wasn't a true survival case, i've seen this with my two girls. They do enjoy the outdoors and doing the bushcraft thing, but if i've gone a bit OTT with it, they can get turned off of it very quickly. So something to break it up in their bags is never a bad thing. Just a little something to give them a bit of normality for five minutes.

Great thread anyway Henygirl


I have two kids and a while ago i started getting them used to carrying their own backpack when we go out on day trips.

As i tell them, if we ever get seperated in the woods, they would have enough to keep themselves warm, dry, fed and watered for at least 24 hrs....which would give me enough time to find them and tan their butts for wandering off.


The main things they each have in their bags are...

1 x tarp for making a quick waterproof shelter, they can add to this with branches and debris for extra warmth if needed. All kids love making dens.

A few elastic bungee cords and some paracord for the shelter building.

Waterproofs

Spare socks.

Warm jumper.

Food of some sort and snacks.

Water.

Whistle. Any problems and they can blow like crazy on this, gets your attention a lot better than shouting.

ID.

Small first aid kit. (Bandage, plasters, saftey pin, wound wipes)

Small swiss army knife.

A book a pad and a pen for writing/doodling.

Fire starting kit, just basic firesteel, cotton wool and a lighter (my kids are old enough now to know not to abuse these and how to build a basic fire with one)

The main knives we use in the woods (Frosts Mora's) are carried by me.

All this fits into a small kids 15 ltr pack and doesn't weigh loads.

Yeah they have a moan now and again about carrying it, but thats becoming less as they grow up. They actualy like the idea of having their own gear to unpack when we stop for a while.

Must admit i haven't got a blanket in there, so thats an extra for the future.

Thanks.

I know it's not a lot of gear when you look at it, but it will keep them safe and it's extra that you don't have to carry in your pack.


CX.



[edit on 1/9/09 by CX]



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 06:56 AM
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Six kids? Phew! Thats going to be fun!

You are on the right track so far, knowing that the little ones won't really understand whats goind on. The teens are closer to realizing there are problems occuring. These are the issues that I fear the most if SHTF. Kids.
I think you have the right ideas. No need for advice.

The packs for the little ones:
-Anything that would take their minds off the situations.
-The best clothing for the season
The teens would be the same way but age-specific as you said.

My only problem with the entire scenario is this: When SHTF....if it ever does...there will be more chaos than calm. Children 40+ years ago were tougher, I believe, able to handle outdoor life, and the woods, effectively.
Children, now, are not used to the woods, or relieving themselves outside everyday. Not used to having nothing to do but work on the farm. Adaptation is key here. Wouldn't take long to get used to.

In essence, the kids today are spoiled? I don't want to offend, but this is the only word I can think of. If we have to go back to the woods and live, where people and children alike would have to give up all the luxuries of home, I think more would go crazy from boredom.


CX

posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 07:15 AM
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Originally posted by havok
Six kids? Phew! Thats going to be fun!



Jeez!!! I missed that bit!
Best of luck with that one!



My only problem with the entire scenario is this: When SHTF....if it ever does...there will be more chaos than calm. Children 40+ years ago were tougher, I believe, able to handle outdoor life, and the woods, effectively.
Children, now, are not used to the woods, or relieving themselves outside everyday. Not used to having nothing to do but work on the farm. Adaptation is key here. Wouldn't take long to get used to.

In essence, the kids today are spoiled? I don't want to offend, but this is the only word I can think of. If we have to go back to the woods and live, where people and children alike would have to give up all the luxuries of home, I think more would go crazy from boredom.


Some excellent points there, so very true.

Kids just aren't as used to going out into the woods playing any more. I know part of this is the parents fault, thats not a bad thing, but with there being so much press about the sicko's in the world, kids don't go wandering off as much any more.

I know when i was a kid, from the age of about 4 or 5 we'd be over the woods all day. You only came back if you were hungry or needed to go to hospital lol.

The other day i had to laugh to myself when i was teaching the kids to make bow and arrows in the forest. There was me telling them all the rules and regulations of bow safety......yet when i was a kid, the first thing you did was sharpened a stick and shot your mate with it!


Oh well, the world has moved on so much, it's just left to us to keep it real for the kids as long as we are able.

CX.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 07:18 AM
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There is so much more for kids to do in a survival situation, than in the "real world" and way more fun.


Garden trowel- kids love to dig.
pruning shears- kids 5 and up who are still to young to handle a knife can use these to gather branches.
Laminate some very clear photos of foods they can forage for.
Craft kits that can come in handy in survival situations, like clay bowl making and candle making.
Kids are going to have a blast fishing and learning to track game. I wouldn't worry to much about entertainment.
Antibiotics- kids get lots of ear infections. In a pinch you can get tetracycline for a fish supply store.
Diamatapp and children's Tylenol
For nausea peppermint tea works wonders.

The biggest thing is they are going to grow so pack clothes that are to big then hem and sew them so it can be taken out later. They have jeans with the adjustable waste bands, so say your child wheres a size 8 buy a size 10 and hem them and have them wear a belt.

Baby wipes- kids just need them
Lots of glow sticks, you can buy them at the dollar store kids love them and they are great for being able to see you kids in the dark.

[edit on 1-9-2009 by calstorm]


CX

posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 07:22 AM
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I just had a thought....you could always photocopy some very easy to understand pages from a survival book, laminate them and slide them in the side of the pack.

Shelter and fire building methods would be a good one to start.

Next time you're camping or out in the woods, get to try and follow some suggestions on the sheets. Some kids enjoy that kind of a challenge, especially if they know mum or dad are'nt going to be telling them what to do.


Maybe put them in charge of the camp and see how they do? I think adults often forget how imaginitive and resoursefull kids can be at times.

They might think of something you would never have.

CX.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 07:22 AM
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Another thing I was thinking about a while ago which actually COULD come in handy, is an Ipod or Iphone, beofre you laugh hear me out first.

How many kids have these handy gadgets?

Get a solar or windup recharger for it, and before the internet gets shutdown load up as many 'survival' manuals or hints and tricks of the woods books as you can get on it.
That way when kiddies are out in the woods they can access the information on the Iphone AND have a communication device. As well as a few games to while away the boredom waiting for Mum and Dad to build up the tent?

How many kids could start a fire without a match these days?, at least with an Iphone the info on how to actually do it or how to build a makeshift dwelling or administer first aid would be readily at hand without being weighed down with paperback books.


CX

posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 07:32 AM
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Originally posted by DataWraith
Another thing I was thinking about a while ago which actually COULD come in handy, is an Ipod or Iphone, beofre you laugh hear me out first.



Not laughing here, with the wind up charger i think it's a great idea.


Agagin, it takes up little or no room at all, and if the kids can carry it then it takes the pressure off of you.

CX.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 07:42 AM
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That's a good idea. I am going to use that one for myself, I was going to bring my zune and found a crank charger on line for pretty cheap. I might as well find some good survival e-books to put on it. several have been posted here.
again great idea.


CX

posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 07:50 AM
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Originally posted by calstorm
Baby wipes- kids just need them


How the hell did i forget that one!


I should have shares in them, even though the kids are grown up now, i always have these around the house and use them whenever we go out.

Cheers for the reminder.


I don't know about anyone else here who has kids, but this thread is giving me a great sense of reassurance that i am doing right by my kids for if things go pearshaped.


I'm sure a lot of people plan for themselves, and totaly forget they have family too.

CX.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 08:02 AM
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I think the most important thing to bring with you is knowledge.

All these things you buy are going to run out, eventually. Everything with batteries, everything related to food, etc. It will eventually run out.

The best thing you can bring are books, or experience. Those never run out. Once you learn to do things on your own, especially as kids, you never forget.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 08:32 AM
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you're missing guns....and lots of ammo. if the shtf, lots of people and animals are going to want to eat them, they need to defend themselves. teach them how to shoot and yes, even the little one. a pocket knife won't do, they must have guns, soldiers use guns for a reason and that's a good enough reason for your kids to have them too.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 09:23 AM
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Wow, y'all have great ideas.


First let me say, we are coming at the survival preparation from two angles.

One, if/when 'it' happens they will have a foundational knowledge so they will be teachable and not so scared.

Two, this stuff is just fun. When kids play inside and electronically play games...outside and camping is just plain old fun.

We have started the camping and are building on it. They get excited when we throw a 'new' twist. At first we make sure there was electricity, then just camp fire, etc.

The survival guide pages is excellent for both angles.

Both of us were taught how to shoot at a young age, so we have passed that down as well. I do have enough guns for each to carry if that becomes necessary.....just not sure I am ready to actually camp and carry that many yet!


Baby steps, but still stuff we need to think about and prepare.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 09:38 AM
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you should also mount guns on your dog so that every time your dog bark it'll fire a shot. nobody gonna eat my dog i tell you.

if you don't have dogs, mount rocket boots on you cat, every time it meows the rocket will launch it to safety.

have recipes and frying pan for your gold fishes, you never know.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 09:40 AM
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Hi Heny, I think you need to reinforce your children's natural curiosity
about nature. Kids love fire and fire making, these might be essential
skills to have. You can teach kids serious subjects in fun ways - you need
to be creative about that. I can reccommend a book by Tom Brown
Jr. called wilderness survival for children. Your children's curiosity is
their key to survival. it can be hard as an adult to remember what
that was like but it may help you as well. there are relatively few
items that you can carry that cannot be made from natural
materials. Some of the things that they should have might include:

whistle and mirror for signaling

pocket knife

rain poncho - doubles as a shelter half

personal water filter - they make cheap ones for about $20 that work
fairly well. YOU should have a good quality water filter that will be your
primary method of water filtration.

Aluminized space blankets - $3 each

GI canteeens and canteen cup (stainless steel, not aluminum) for
water and cooking.

Get your kids to draw plants and animal tracks. let them build
their own shelters from natural materials. Play hide and seek in
the woods. makes games out of survival skills and they will learn
and have fun. make a game of finding things they can eat and
then checking them against your field guides. make teas from pine needles. The list is endless! Best of luck>


i wanted to add a quickie idea - the older kids and you might really have fun with paintball guns and dividing into teams, developin different tactical scenarios. we've done it and it's a blast. (with my kids)

[edit on 1-9-2009 by Asktheanimals]



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 09:44 AM
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yes,when america collapses,looters will be roaming the american wasteland hunting and bagging children as their meat is the most tender.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 10:00 AM
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I assume some of the posts are jokes?


Okay the poncho's are great idea.

Whistle is another great one too.

Everyone's creativity is amazing. I like the idea of adding the paintball guns to our next adventure. As well as drawing and identifying different plants and tracks. We already bird watch on our trips.

One of the things that got me started teaching them some basics was the death of my grandmother. She taught each of us cooking, sewing and food storage like canning and freezing skills. It was great bonding time, it is stuff I can use in my everyday life and stuff I can use to survive if needed.



posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 11:09 AM
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With that many kiddos in that age group I'd suggest looking into flexible solar panels if you can afford it. Else, there are still robust portable solar rigs that can charge small electronics.

I love reading about the hairy knuckled survivalist types that live in their parents' basement and have air powered rifles that look like the real thing (or maybe have the real thing.)

Their BOB's are fully stocked and they are ready to get down to business killing anything that moves in a post-apocalyptic nightmare aftermath of radioactive jumble of what's left of our pathetic humanity. Zombies behind every bush. Snipers on every rooftop.


BUT, what about the family? Real people have genuine concerns in a more realistic SHTF. Like, gas is suddenly in short supply, city services like running water or electricity is in short supply. (like in Mexico City parts of the city were rationed and low water pressure sent people to the streets.)
Brown outs or temporary black outs. When SHTF you may not want to bug out.

I got off of track... It's the kids, when you have the big stuff taken care of... Temporary shelter plans & materials, backup food supply and water, water filters, gas cans, kevlar vests/tactical vests for hubby and wifey, Plasma rifle, etc... Small solar panels to power the kids electronics. A small lightweight laptop carefully packed and loaded with eBooks and survival techniques. Back up the really good stuff on flash drives. It's Mandatory to keep those kids occupied when you have down time. Most people don't consider that when packing their BOB's. Kids will need to weened from these toys. It won't happen over night, either.

sarcasm:
Oh yeah, there's so much killin' and skinnin' and barterin' and drinkin' and oh so many Splosions! there'll be no down time. Kids? What?
/sarcasm

Solar panel rig and good rechargeable batteries to go around.


[edit on 9·1·09 by DrMattMaddix]


CX

posted on Sep, 1 2009 @ 11:14 AM
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Originally posted by Henygirl
I assume some of the posts are jokes?




I should think so, i'd expect even in the discussion of horrible scenarios, people can remember that we are talking about members children here.

Hopefuly a good thread won't be spoilt by comments that might get peoples backs up


As you say though, it's probably just joke, in which case i'll take my old mans hat off.


CX.




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