World Prepares to Dump the Dollar

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posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 02:15 PM
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Originally posted by jmotley

Please feel free to disclose any holes in my theory, I will provide the patches.


You said it would cost 75 million, try 75 trillion..That's a pretty big hole right there




posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 02:17 PM
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reply to post by marg6043
 


Hi marg! Didn't see your "reply to" until just now. Exactly , no one knows for sure , but it's acknowledged that the dragon is sweeping it's tail across a both developed , and developing resource-rich landscapes.

I bought-into a Tanzanian based Jr Exploration Co back in 2006 , and began researching China's relationships and in-roads on the continent...with emphasis on Tanzania and Zambia. Chinese $ commitments span decades...infrastructure...agriculture...mining...social programs....and that Jr is currently under negotiations with Chinese mining interests on some of it's Gold & nickel licenses.

Beware xenophobic , China-negative press emanating from Western media sources.

Hope all is well!



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 02:37 PM
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GOOD! DUmp the dollar, AND every other form of money. We should have a resource based economy anyway. Money is stupid. It causes competition and greed which are both bringing this world to it's knees!



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 03:33 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Well that is OK, after the biggest used to be economy of the world the US never learned how to balance them either, Look at the government deficit and spending, look at the banks and their balance sheets, I guess on that one China could not learn from the mighty US.


It took decades for America to become a nation of loan and credit spenders perhaps it will take China less than one decade to beat Americas record.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 03:34 PM
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reply to post by OBE1
 


Well never to late my friend, thanks for replying, still I aways feel that is more to China that we have been allow to believe.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 03:56 PM
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Originally posted by OBE1

I bought-into a Tanzanian based Jr Exploration Co back in 2006 , and began researching China's relationships and in-roads on the continent...with emphasis on Tanzania and Zambia. Chinese $ commitments span decades...infrastructure...agriculture...mining...social programs....and that Jr is currently under negotiations with Chinese mining interests on some of it's Gold & nickel licenses.

Beware xenophobic , China-negative press emanating from Western media sources.



Thanks China, now go home: buy-up of Zambia revives old colonial fears

When the foundation stone was laid for the Mulungushi textile factory three decades ago, the project was hailed as another demonstration of communist China doing for Zambia what the capitalist west would not.

Beijing put up the money to build Zambia China Mulungushi Textiles and provided the expertise to run it. It grew to become the biggest textile mill in the country, manufacturing 17m metres of fabric a year and 100,000 pieces of clothing, and winning international awards for the quality of its cloth. The mill employed more than 1,000 people, propped up the economy of Kabwe in northern Zambia and kept thousands of cotton growers in business.

But last month the factory shut down production, strangled by a new wave of Chinese interest across Africa that some critics say amounts to little more than another round of foreign plunder, as Beijing extracts minerals and other natural resources at knock-down prices while battering the continent's economies with a flood of subsidised goods and surplus labour.

Hostility is such in some quarters that the Chinese president, Hu Jintao, on an eight-country tour of Africa to promote Beijing's blossoming trade relationship with the continent, cancelled plans to launch a $200m (£100m) smelter at a Chinese-owned Zambian copper mine at the weekend because of miners' anger at working conditions. He also faced protests from the sacked Mulungushi factory workers.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 04:40 PM
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reply to post by Rigel Kent
 


actually if you might want to drop any direct deposit too because the banks might seriously start penalizing people from removing all the money out of the account.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 04:46 PM
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Originally posted by SLAYER69

But last month the factory shut down production, strangled by a new wave of Chinese interest across Africa that some critics say amounts to little more than another round of foreign plunder, as Beijing extracts minerals and other natural resources at knock-down prices while battering the continent's economies with a flood of subsidised goods and surplus labour.



Interesting but I thought that the UK were the ones that plunged first into the natural resources of Africa.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 04:49 PM
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reply to post by marg6043
 


ohhh So that makes it OK.
Hmmm interesting perspective.



[edit on 30-7-2009 by SLAYER69]



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 04:54 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


No, dear, I been sarcastic
when the UK has been doing the same for decades now China wants a piece of the pie so what is the difference.

I got it, China is communist, but then again are not they our trade partners also? Gob forbid we lose them as our biggest holders of debt.

Darn China, right ?


Nothing but hypocrisy SLAYER and then we are played into it.

[edit on 29-7-2009 by marg6043]



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 04:58 PM
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reply to post by marg6043
 


I think this about sums it up for me.

Hot Air Dragon: Is China About to Pop?

I do not ascribe to either of these uninformed, ideologically-driven islands of ignorance.


First, let's acknowledge--and dismiss--the main subtexts which play out in any discussion of U.S.-China trade: Many of the "China is the inevitable superpower of the 21st Century" crowd are, beneath their cheerleading, deeply anti-American; they hope China replaces the U.S. as the global superpower not because they are enamored of China (though they may be) but because they loathe the policies and indeed, the power, of the U.S. In this they are akin to the Soviet sympathizers who romanticized life in the Cold War gulag/USSR because they disapproved of U.S. policy and power.

On the other hand, China bashers view everything through the prism of a "clash of civilizations" in which China is constantly working to weaken U.S. interests in order to replace the U.S. as the global superpower. Every act is viewed not as China's understandable impulse to act in its own self-interest, just as the U.S. does, but as an attack on U.S. interests


[edit on 29-7-2009 by SLAYER69]



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 05:02 PM
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ugh getting rough.


1 dollar buys you 65%



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 05:05 PM
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Perfect relationships ? Never , but the dark underbelly of business cuts both ways....

Tanzania: MPs in Fiery Fight to Close Barrick Gold Mine

Civilian Uprising against Barrick Gold in Tanzania

Barrick


Like I said , beware xenophobic , China-negative press emanating from Western media sources.

allAfrica.com....


Uganda: China is Not a Threat to Continent - Museveni

Kampala — PRESIDENT Yoweri Museveni has assured Western powers that Africa is capable of protecting its resources from any exploitation by foreign countries....

....Museveni, accompanied by the First Lady, Janet, said unlike in colonial times, African leaders have identified their priorities and are capable of protecting the continent's interests.

Full Text


Rwanda: China, Rwanda Vow to Boost Trade Relations

Nigeria: Science Minister Seeks Pacts With China On Space Technology


We can both cherry-pick all day , I guess , point being , China was cultivating relationships in Africa when the only alternative was the IMF. West stood-by and watched...now they're concerned.

Day late , and multiple dollars short.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 05:05 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


All roads lead to China selfsuffiencient and biggest role into the global economy with a very loud vocal vote.

Still they do not do anything that is not for their own best interest, while the US is looking for others best interest.

The Art of war was not fable book after all and as the book the Chinese has been abiding by.

It was a time when people were thinking about how China will take the US by military might, I was telling everybody that military might will not be, in todays world of economic the weapon of choice is economic power.

Those that control natural resources control the world.

[edit on 29-7-2009 by marg6043]



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 05:08 PM
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reply to post by OBE1
 


Get over yourself.


Nobody is bashing anybody. But unlike many here I refuse to walk blindly into the fire like so many sheeple. We CAN cherry pick all day. I do it for entertainment others take it personally.

It's funny how some people get so emotional over these types of debates.




posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 05:08 PM
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reply to post by OBE1
 


That is the same error that the US has been making when it comes to south America, while the US were fighting wars in the middle east and fattening private interest pockets so China was cementing relationships with the forgotten countries in our own continent.

What a joke.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 05:12 PM
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Hidden from sight, debt creeps up on China

BEIJING (Reuters) - On the surface, China presents a fiscal study in contrast with the United States, keeping a remarkably low ceiling on debt even as it spends its way out of the financial crisis.

But hidden liabilities mean China's books are uglier -- potentially much uglier -- than at first sight.

Thanks to successive years of fast economic growth and even faster government revenue growth, the official debt-to-GDP ratio was 17.7 percent at the end of last year, far lower than almost any other major economy.

The trouble is that excludes local government borrowing, the current surge in loans backstopped by Beijing and bad assets cleared from the banking system but still floating about.

When all are thrown into the pot, analysts estimate that China's debt may be closer to 60 percent of GDP, putting it in virtually the same league as the United States, which was at 70 percent at the end of 2008 before it launched its massive economic stimulus program.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 05:15 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Well if that is true time will only tell which economic power will go down first the mighty USA or the newly developed and developing China.



posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 05:16 PM
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Originally posted by marg6043
reply to post by OBE1
 


That is the same error that the US has been making when it comes to south America, while the US were fighting wars in the middle east and fattening private interest pockets so China was cementing relationships with the forgotten countries in our own continent.

What a joke.



Yeah it's pretty funny





posted on Jul, 29 2009 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by SLAYER69
 


Thanks for the picture, but as you know very well Chavez loyalties are right now with China and he is supporting the new emerging currency proposed by China.

Years of bad policies coming from the Bush administration toward Venezuela is not going to be over just like that.





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