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Hurricane forming off Alaska coast?

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posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 03:33 PM
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Interesting, its not even showing up in the tropical/'cane section of Weather Underground. More worrying is Invest 93 down around the gulf which may begin hungrily scarfing up the warm gulf water and crossing to the US side before chewing up something.




posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 03:39 PM
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As per Environment Canada:



Marine Forecast Winds Issued

10:30 AM PDT 27 June 2009
Today Tonight and Sunday

Gale warning in effect. Wind southwest 25 to 35 knots becoming 20 to 30 late this afternoon then becoming westerly 20 early Sunday morning.

Wind diminishing to westerly 10 Sunday evening.


Waves

Issued 02:00 AM PDT

27 June 2009
Today Tonight and Sunday

Seas 3 to 4 metres building to 3 to 5 early this afternoon then subsiding to 4 overnight. Seas subsiding to 3 Sunday morning and to 2 Sunday evening. Extended Forecast

Issued 04:00 AM PDT 27 June 2009 Monday Wind northwest 20 to 30 knots. Tuesday Wind northwest 10 to 20 knots. Wednesday Wind northwest 10 to 20 knots. Weather & Visibility

Issued 10:30 AM PDT 27 June 2009 Today Tonight and Sunday A few showers.



posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 03:40 PM
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I found this. So apparently they are known...just not considered tropical.
Mission News



But tropical cyclones aren't the only storms that generate hurricane-force winds. Among others that do is a type of storm that dominates the weather in parts of the United States and other non-tropical regions every fall, winter and into spring: extratropical cyclones.

Extratropical Cyclones: Meteorological 'Bombs'

Scientists have long known that extratropical cyclones (also known as mid-latitude or baroclinic storms) sometimes produce hurricane-force winds. But before QuikScat, hurricane-force extratropical cyclones were thought to be relatively rare. Thanks to QuikScat, we now know that such storms occur much more frequently than previously believed, and the satellite has given forecasters an effective tool for routinely and consistently detecting and forecasting them.

These storms, which occur near busy trans-oceanic shipping lanes, pose a significant threat to life and property for those on the high seas, generating high winds and waves up to 30 meters (100 feet) high. When they make landfall, in areas like Alaska, the Pacific Northwest, New England and the U.S. mid-Atlantic coast, they produce strong winds, high surf, coastal flooding, heavy rains, river flooding and even blizzard conditions.



posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 03:48 PM
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awesome, more Extrastuff, next is when the horrible lightnings start, then we will have Extraordinary strong Lightning storms, and it slides in under the 'norm of things' and 1000's of people will die because the are lead to belive it is normal and nothing to worry about ..

I say, huge storm ahead in places that are unusual and times when it is unusual, remember my words Dudettes, this wil come ..
has started actualy and we will get a glimpse of the coming years ahead.

Salute, trust the lies and hope for the best ..



posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 03:52 PM
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Thanks liveandlearn! Now I can start pulling papers.


On a side note, isn't it an amazing time - when so many people from so many different places can share ideas and real time information and learn so much from each other?

I can't get the strikestarUS page to load for some reason, but I'll for sure keep an eye on the Environment Canada Lightning Detection site..



Compared to the current jetstream



[edit on 27-6-2009 by brokenheadphonez]



posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 03:59 PM
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I did have to go back to the NOAA map and look further south and did find it. One thing I hate about being American is I have so little concept of meters and Celsius... and little knowledge of knots either.

I know that tropical storm winds are anything over 40 mph and hurricanes is over 70.

It is a nasty looking system and I would hope not one boat is out there under that mess.

I agree that the computer age is one great time to be alive. I often laugh when I think about the old Get Smart shoe when I was a kid. Now we have every one of the cool things Maxwell had. Glad that phones aren't shoes though.

[edit on 6/27/2009 by redhead57]



posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 03:59 PM
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I like those other photos better.. I hope you can upload new ones soon.. I found the Alaskan Radar on weather wunderground to be OK but still yours shows that very small and clearly defined eye in the center... the rest of the mass is just swirling around it ...

Creppy find.... Do you know if this tropical whatever it is is moving west or south?



posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 04:02 PM
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It's a cold-core low, as opposed to a warm-core, as in tropical cyclones. Expected conditions are 40-50 knot winds. Sea surface storm warnings in effect: Forecast

nice and symmetrical. Not particularly rare, but interesting to study.



posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 04:04 PM
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reply to post by redhead57
 


1 knots = 1.15077945 miles per hour

Here's a converter for celcius and farenheit:

www.stabb.com...

Here is the Environment Canada Satellite imagery that seems to have the most definition.



posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 04:07 PM
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reply to post by brokenheadphonez
 




On a side note, isn't it an amazing time - when so many people from so many different places can share ideas and real time information and learn so much from each other?


You are so right. I have learned a lot here. Had you not posted I would never have known to look it up.



posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 04:15 PM
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I take it you guys don't watch Deadliest Catch?

In the episode they showed 2 weeks ago, which was shot much sooner I would imagine, they had 40-50 knot winds, and 40 foot seas.

The storms up there can get to be pretty violent.

Images, as well as the zone in which they form included in the link below.

Extratropical cyclone



Extratropical cyclones, sometimes called mid-latitude cyclones or wave cyclones, are a group of cyclones defined as synoptic scale low pressure weather systems that occur in the middle latitudes of the Earth (outside the tropics) having neither tropical nor polar characteristics, and are connected with fronts and horizontal gradients in temperature and dew point otherwise known as "baroclinic zones".[1] Extratropical cyclones are the everyday phenomena which, along with anticyclones, drive the weather over much of the Earth, producing anything from cloudiness and mild showers to heavy gales and thunderstorms.



posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 04:33 PM
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reply to post by badmedia
 


Haha no, I don't usually watch too much TV personally. Thanks for the link, so is it fair to say that this is ... An almost hurricane off of the coasts of Alaska/BC/the Yukon?

Thanks everyone for sharing your knowledge, thoughts, and links.



posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 04:38 PM
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Captured this:



Here's an animation showing the formation in way more detail. Fascinating.

Go to the bottom of the page and press the "ALL" images radio button, then the play button at the top.

Infrared:

www.weatheroffice.gc.ca...

And visible:

www.weatheroffice.gc.ca...

[edit on 27-6-2009 by brokenheadphonez]



posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 05:00 PM
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Probably an irrelevant
AND many people still are unsure / unconvinced

but this interesting crop formation appeared not too long ago....
www.cropcircleconnector.com...

from www.cropcircleconnector.com...

don't know why exactly, but I drew the impression of wind from this.
or maybe solar wind, the item in the centre perhaps being the sun.

We've had a recent re-awakening of the sun in terms of activity.



posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 05:10 PM
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reply to post by matsplat
 


I think the circles are beautiful, but I think they're like Rorschach test's and due to their geometric and/or fractal patterns it's really hard to accurately interpret them.



posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 05:18 PM
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I lived on the west coast for most of my life. It looks like a pretty normal storm. A bit late/early for this time of year, but with NOAA predicting a return to El Nino conditions this summer it doesn't seem strange to me. The winds aren't particularly high or out of the range of normal in my experience.




posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 05:21 PM
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Originally posted by brokenheadphonez
reply to post by badmedia
 


Haha no, I don't usually watch too much TV personally. Thanks for the link, so is it fair to say that this is ... An almost hurricane off of the coasts of Alaska/BC/the Yukon?

Thanks everyone for sharing your knowledge, thoughts, and links.


I don't know too much about it honestly.

I once had to make a site that included weather reporting which worked off feeds from the weather channel. They would only give us the current images in the feed, nothing animated. So I took and saved the images over time and wrote a little program that turned them into animations.

The animations I put out to the public were over a time period of 4 hours worth, and it repeated over and over like you would see on TV. But privately, I kept an animation that ended up having over 6 months of weather in a single animated image. And I would watch the animation all the time and I would see odd things like what you see about them.

I also noticed the British get some crazy weather patterns. So if you want to see more "oddities" you should check that area out as well. They were odd to me anyway, maybe not so much to them.

It was really cool stuff, but I ended up losing the image in a computer crash, and once the site was done and sold, I didn't have access to have it make another. If anyone wants to shell out $1500 a month for the feeds, I'll make another.



posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 05:39 PM
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reply to post by badmedia
 


The furthest I can go so far is 36 hours, but there's a striking similarity to some of the solar weather patterns I've been looking at too, maybe because it's fractal ...

Sucks that you lost that image, I'd have loved to have seen it. I'm gonna go on a search after I finish cooking dinner.

mmm chicken fried rice with snow peas, celery, corn, egg, sprouts, and my special blend of spices and kikkoman mMMm



posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 05:56 PM
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The event is now out of GOES coverage area.



posted on Jun, 27 2009 @ 06:16 PM
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I was able to access StrikeStar lightning strike data..




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