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NASA Goes Public with Solar Cycle Prediction 2013 Its Not Good!

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posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:24 AM
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May 29, 2009: An international panel of experts led by NOAA and sponsored by NASA has released a new prediction for the next solar cycle. Solar Cycle 24 will peak, they say, in May 2013 with a below-average number of sunspots.


No matter how hard some people may try its impossible to bury your head in the sand and not see whats going in infront of your eyes.



Even a below-average cycle is capable of producing severe space weather," points out Biesecker. "The great geomagnetic storm of 1859, for instance, occurred during a solar cycle of about the same size we’re predicting for 2013."


All this 2012 talk and prophecies about the end of the world e.t.c is very frightening, something is happening and is going to happen.



The 1859 storm--known as the "Carrington Event" after astronomer Richard Carrington who witnessed the instigating solar flare--electrified transmission cables, set fires in telegraph offices, and produced Northern Lights so bright that people could read newspapers by their red and green glow. A recent report by the National Academy of Sciences found that if a similar storm occurred today, it could cause $1 to 2 trillion in damages to society's high-tech infrastructure and require four to ten years for complete recovery. For comparison, Hurricane Katrina caused "only" $80 to 125 billion in damage.


Should we be worried I think so.



"The sun is behaving in an unexpected and very interesting way."



Link to source




posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 08:35 AM
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Last Spring I spent almost all of my time outside observing nature, the sky and clouds and growing herbs. From March until September, I paid attention to the sun's course throughout the day so that I could maximize the use of my small plot of garden, noting the hours of sun and shade in various locations. At the back of my yard there are pine trees which affect the shaded areas at certain times of the day. Toward the east and west there is open land with no buildings or trees to cause shadows. I planned the raised beds and planted my herbs and flowers according to their sun/shade needs.

This year, the existing raised beds with perenials from last year are receiving less sun. ??? Each area is receiving approximately 1 hour less of direct sun compared to last year.

The sunrise in the east is further north this year compared to last year where by 7:30 AM the sun was fully visible in the eastern sky, to my right. The sunset is similarly off with the shade of the pines covering my planting beds before 7:30 PM, while last year the beds received full sun until 8:30 PM.

Strange. I'm no scientist. I just observe.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 09:19 AM
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So... has 2012 been moved to 2013 now?


I fail to read any doom and gloom in NASA's predictions. All they are really saying is that even though sunspots will be low doesn't mean there won't be some decent activity... but it also doesn't state that there definitely will be either.

It's just a game of wait and see. Until then, there's no need to worry because your worry wont change events that are out of your control.

IRM



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 09:22 AM
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reply to post by InfaRedMan
 




The 1859 storm--known as the "Carrington Event" after astronomer Richard Carrington who witnessed the instigating solar flare--electrified transmission cables, set fires in telegraph offices, and produced Northern Lights so bright that people could read newspapers by their red and green glow. A recent report by the National Academy of Sciences found that if a similar storm occurred today, it could cause $1 to 2 trillion in damages to society's high-tech infrastructure and require four to ten years for complete recovery. For comparison, Hurricane Katrina caused "only" $80 to 125 billion in damage.


Thats just for starters of course don't take my word for it thats what googles for



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 10:28 AM
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I think I sayd it ones befor, it has started, this thing we are lead to believe will start in 30 to 50 years 'if dont dont stop driveing cars so much',I think is to make us think things are ok for now and there is no need to panic.

Lets see how this summer goes and make assuptions out from that.
If the hurricans and floodings and heat is above normal, we know next year is gonna be worse....

the weather on earth is an results of the weather on the sun.
Warming oceans is no good thing.. '' The Oceans feel this heat'' from the area51 caller, just wanted to toss some paranormal in here . .



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 10:35 AM
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reply to post by franspeakfree
 


Can you remind me again why I need to worry.
Look at cycle 23 in the link. Look how much activity there was, and this cycle, 24 will see less activity.
Worried. Not.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 10:37 AM
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Part of me is afraid of what may happen, but another part is happy because I've always wanted to see the northern lights


Check out this site that has details about what might happen if a solar storm did hit us:
Space storm alert: 90 seconds from catastrophe

According to the NAS report, a severe space weather event in the US could induce ground currents that would knock out 300 key transformers within about 90 seconds, cutting off the power for more than 130 million people (see map). From that moment, the clock is ticking for America.
First to go - immediately for some people - is drinkable water. Anyone living in a high-rise apartment, where water has to be pumped to reach them, would be cut off straight away. For the rest, drinking water will still come through the taps for maybe half a day. With no electricity to pump water from reservoirs, there is no more after that. There is simply no electrically powered transport: no trains, underground or overground. Our just-in-time culture for delivery networks may represent the pinnacle of efficiency, but it means that supermarket shelves would empty very quickly - delivery trucks could only keep running until their tanks ran out of fuel, and there is no electricity to pump any more from the underground tanks at filling stations. Back-up generators would run at pivotal sites - but only until their fuel ran out. For hospitals, that would mean about 72 hours of running a bare-bones, essential care only, service. After that, no more modern healthcare.


People would be freaking out! Even if we still had the basics, like food, water and healthcare, people wouldn't know what to do with themselves without their internet, cell phones, tv, fridges, microwaves, video games and mp3 players...

There really is no point in worrying about it though, since it's not something you can change. Just keep an eye on the situation and keep emergency supplies ready, like you should be doing anyway.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 11:16 AM
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I dont see what the cause for worry is here, at best they are saying there will be less activity than the last cycle, a cycle that we managed to get through alright. I dont know how you came to the interpretation in thread title that its not good, thats jumping the gun a fair bit. The sun is waking up now after a solar minnimum like it always does, there is no doom and gloom in that, just what you make of it.
More fearmongering on ATS about things people dont understand, who would of thought.



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 07:57 AM
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reply to post by franspeakfree
 


Oh don't get me wrong... I know about the "Carrington Event". It's just that I don't feel it's necessarily going to be the scenario. As I said, it's really a game of wait & see.

IRM



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