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My Yowie Encounter - Photographic 'Expedition'

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posted on Jun, 3 2009 @ 06:47 AM
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reply to post by fooffstarr
 


Where do you plan to investigate and how?
It would be really cool if you could make a thread outlining what your next adventure entails, equiptment inventory, techniques etc....keep us up to date.....then again I wouldn't be too specific about locations; you'd probably get hoaxers......hmmmmm, its not that I'm suggesting it would be anyone on this forum, I hope not.hmmmmm
Keep us posted.




posted on Jun, 3 2009 @ 04:39 PM
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reply to post by KRISKALI777
 


Yeah, I probably will start a new thread If I get something going, but there aren't many (if any) people I know interested enough to join me.

As far as the location thing, I'm being fairly secretive about that anyway. Last time I posted my story, the first thread, a guy managed to track me down, find my phone number, and harassed me about the sighting. He wouldn't take 'No, I won't show you where it happened' as an answer. I'm not going out into the bush with some guy I don't even know that has tracked my details over the internet.

So yeah, location is staying my little secret for now.



posted on Jun, 3 2009 @ 09:33 PM
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Foof

In your opinion, what makes the Yowie so much more aggressive than its American cousin?

And do you carry a weapon (rifle, pistol, etc) while walking about in the bush?



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 02:19 AM
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Originally posted by Atomic_Feline
Foof

In your opinion, what makes the Yowie so much more aggressive than its American cousin?

And do you carry a weapon (rifle, pistol, etc) while walking about in the bush?


Hi


In my opinion it is to do with their history.

There is a stark contrast between the way the Aboriginal treated the Yowie to the way the American Indian treated Bigfoot.

The American Indians (to my knowledge) respected Bigfoot as a sort of protector of the forest. They ruled that he should be left alone.

The Australian Aboriginals, however, never got along too well with the Yowie. There are reports that large scale skirmishes were fought on the east coast between tribes of Aboriginals and a group of Yowies. The Yowies lost and were driven into the mountains.

I can only assume that they still harbor a hatred for, and fear of, humans.

As far as weapons, no I don't carry anything. In Australia, you can't just walk around with a knife or gun without getting into serious trouble. I have license for neither, so it is just me and my 100m sprint times that can keep me alive if something were to go wrong.


[edit on 4-6-2009 by fooffstarr]



posted on Jun, 4 2009 @ 04:49 AM
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reply to post by fooffstarr
 


Ahhh yes. that goes along with my personal theory that Homo sapiens (last of the Hominids); is the survivor only for one fact: we are the most vicious.



posted on Jun, 7 2009 @ 03:10 AM
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Having read your original posting/narrative and now seeing the pictures of the area all I have to say is I think you guys were nuts to even think about going there at night!!


I can't say as I'd go there alone in the day time like you did to take these pics either after having had the experience.

I am a city person but about ten years ago I took a motorcycle trip cross country and camped out along the way. One night in Northern Wisconsin, I was camped out in a state park with no other people there at the time. My site was along side a stream. During the night I awoke to an overpowering smell that to me reminded me of wet farm animal or something. I thought it had to be either a bear or other large animal. I had my pepper spray handy but fortunately nothing more came of it.

Mine wasn't a Yowie/Saskquatch experience, but your description of an awful smell just brought back the memories and made the hair on my neck stand on end. This made your story sound very real to me.



posted on Jun, 7 2009 @ 04:06 AM
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To me, the first and third crushed crass pics look like something stepped on them, and whatever it was was pretty big. The second pic looks like something lay down there, maybe a Yowie took a nap there? The trail of flattened grass looks like probably more than one Yowie came charging through there, and as for the tree, it defianately wasn't a deer, because deers can't reach that high, and it looks like it could be a Yowie to me.

Do you know what Yowies eat? You could leave some food in front of a hidden camera (motion sensitive or something) and see if you get any result.



posted on Jun, 7 2009 @ 06:35 PM
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reply to post by wayno
 


Thanks for the post.

Yeah we were pretty stupid. But we were teenagers and none of us wanted to look weak for the others, so it was a matter of an off-hand suggestion of taking the 'shortcut' becoming an unspoken dare of sorts.

I wouldn't be surprised if the smell you experienced was related to one of these creatures. Probably checking your camp out from a distance. Could have been anything though, so that is just my opinion.


reply to post by omg aliens are so real
 


Yeah, the grass could have been caused by anything really. But to me, standing next to it, whatever made the impressions was many times bigger than me. As others have said, it could have been a group of kangaroos, but it would have had to have been a fair few.

I'd love to set up some trailcams with bait, but as I'm finding out, they aren't cheap.



posted on Mar, 9 2010 @ 02:42 AM
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Feral pigs are more likely mate.


1. Feral Pigs, Sus scrofa Linnaeus 1758, are descended from domestic stock introduced to Australia by European settlers, and possibly from introductions to northern Australia from Timor and New Guinea (Choquenot et al. 1996; Pavlov 2000). Feral Pigs are found across continental Australia with the highest densities in NSW, Qld and through northern Australia to the Kimberley region. In 2002, Feral Pigs were estimated to inhabit 61% of the area of NSW and the ACT (West and Saunders 2003). 'Predation, habitat degradation, competition and disease transmission by Feral Pigs' is currently listed as a key threatening process under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

2. Feral Pigs are opportunistic omnivores (Pavlov 2000). They feed predominantly on grasses, however, bulbs, tubers, roots, seeds, fruit, fungal fruit-bodies (sporocarps), carrion, and vertebrate and invertebrate prey are all consumed when available.



Feral Pigs have been implicated as potential vectors of disease. In particular, Feral Pigs may be responsible for spreading Phytophthora cinnamoni, a root-rot fungus responsible for die-back in native vegetation (DEH 2003b). There is evidence that Feral Pigs can carry the fungus on their hooves (Kliejunas and Ko 1976), and that the spread of the fungus is associated with soil disturbance and reduction of litter cover by pigs (Brown 1976). Further, chewing and other damage to tree trunks may facilitate infection of vegetation by the fungus and other diseases.


www.environment.nsw.gov.au...



posted on Jul, 18 2010 @ 03:30 AM
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There could possibly be a reason why you had the urge to turn around and take one of your photos: #7 Grasslands give way to dense rainforest

Probably nothing, but looks odd.

The tree is interesting, but the bark on many species of tree are very odd looking. From the resolution in this thread, the bark looks typical (unless up close you saw scratches, etc). The 'Paper Bark' tree is a case in point regarding the odd formation of bark.

[edit on 18-7-2010 by CitizenNum287119327]



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 04:40 AM
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reply to post by CitizenNum287119327
 


Nice find, and thanks for posting.

It could be anything, but it certainly does look out of place. I've actually shot a film in the area since this thread was made and we encountered nothing out of the ordinary during the months we spent there.

As time is going on, I'm becoming less and less concerned with the nature of what I saw that night. I guess it is part of 'growing up'. I just accept that it was something unexplainable at this point in time.

I am hoping that, with the equipment I now have access to, that I will one day organize a proper expedition in the area. But sadly work and surviving take priority for me these days.



posted on Jul, 19 2010 @ 06:44 PM
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Originally posted by fooffstarr
reply to post by CitizenNum287119327
 


As time is going on, I'm becoming less and less concerned with the nature of what I saw that night. I guess it is part of 'growing up'. I just accept that it was something unexplainable at this point in time.


Less concerned? I assume you're still a "believer", and under this assumption are you suggesting that:

1) You're not as frightened anymore.
2) You don't have as much time to think about Cryptozoology (namely the Yowie) anymore.
3) You aren't as convinced as you were before, with what was seen that day?

Just curious, thanks.

[edit on 19-7-2010 by Ajax]



posted on Jul, 20 2010 @ 04:06 PM
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Bit of all 3 to be honest. Although, mainly the fact that the time just isn't there.

Every time they make the news my interest piques again, but it doesn't happen that often.



posted on Nov, 19 2010 @ 07:23 AM
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Originally posted by wayaboveitall
Feral pigs are more likely mate.


1. Feral Pigs, Sus scrofa Linnaeus 1758, are descended from domestic stock introduced to Australia by European settlers, and possibly from introductions to northern Australia from Timor and New Guinea (Choquenot et al. 1996; Pavlov 2000). Feral Pigs are found across continental Australia with the highest densities in NSW, Qld and through northern Australia to the Kimberley region. In 2002, Feral Pigs were estimated to inhabit 61% of the area of NSW and the ACT (West and Saunders 2003). 'Predation, habitat degradation, competition and disease transmission by Feral Pigs' is currently listed as a key threatening process under the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.

2. Feral Pigs are opportunistic omnivores (Pavlov 2000). They feed predominantly on grasses, however, bulbs, tubers, roots, seeds, fruit, fungal fruit-bodies (sporocarps), carrion, and vertebrate and invertebrate prey are all consumed when available.



Feral Pigs have been implicated as potential vectors of disease. In particular, Feral Pigs may be responsible for spreading Phytophthora cinnamoni, a root-rot fungus responsible for die-back in native vegetation (DEH 2003b). There is evidence that Feral Pigs can carry the fungus on their hooves (Kliejunas and Ko 1976), and that the spread of the fungus is associated with soil disturbance and reduction of litter cover by pigs (Brown 1976). Further, chewing and other damage to tree trunks may facilitate infection of vegetation by the fungus and other diseases.


www.environment.nsw.gov.au...


Really interesting stuff, I personally believe these creatures exist, there are just too many people over the years that have no reason to lie about their sightings. Thanks for sharing your encounter with us


You beat me to it with the pigs. I live on the edge of the Las Padres National Forrest in Monterey County California and the pigs do the exact same thing to grassy areas here, if you didn't know better you would think an Elephant was romping around in the grass. Things never seem to be how they are perceived in nature, makes it more fun to explore it imho.

These were taken less than a mile from my home, its pretty rugged country but nothing like your neck of the woods.

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