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Here's a look at the future of technology!

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posted on May, 29 2009 @ 10:42 PM
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I don't think this has been posted before (a search came up with nothing)

www.frigginrandom.com...

This truly is a look in at the future of cellular phones/everything else you could imagine in a portable device. Of course, the version show here is only the start, eventually these devices would be very small.

When you think about it, the way something like this would change society would be huge. Just imagine how this will change things on social, business and political levels!




posted on May, 29 2009 @ 10:55 PM
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That's some cool technology.

I never thought we would be able to watch a video in the newspaper.

It reminded me of Harry Potter.



posted on May, 29 2009 @ 11:10 PM
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yea that is kinda neat!

she said it'd cost about the same as a modern cell-phone, but for some reason i don't believe that...



posted on May, 29 2009 @ 11:26 PM
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That was cool OP thank you.
I personally would prefer a display inside my sunglasses.
Or flip down screen over one eye.
I hope they get plenty of funding to keep improving this.

It would be great for medical students or even emergency treatment from the average person who has no medical training.

As they could get medical advice on the spot for treating a condition.

[edit on 29-5-2009 by SvenTheBerserK]



posted on May, 30 2009 @ 02:04 AM
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the ending was kinda scary...

"maybe we'll see this as a future brain implant."

If this acts as a cell phone...all cell phones have their own numbers in barcode-style...and "everyone" has a cell phone...

slippery slope. :-P



posted on May, 30 2009 @ 02:42 AM
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The ending of it sounded scary what did she mean by brain implant?

Seems to me that everyone can be big brother.

I believe now that governments already use devices like this and ar eonly giving an infant version to the population. Scary!

[edit on 30-5-2009 by Applesandoranges]



posted on May, 30 2009 @ 03:30 AM
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Originally posted by Applesandoranges
The ending of it sounded scary what did she mean by brain implant?


We have the technology, now.

Unlike what we used to think - we've found that the brain is an extremely adaptive system. You can connect probes to any portion of your brain (well, technically, you don't even need to do that, newer technologies will allow monitoring of brain activity via a headband and altered LED technology) and use some logical method to illicit an output from the activity, and your brain will eventually learn to use something.

Now, obviously, attaching implants to regions of the brain that correspond with their desired function expedites the process. So does programming the implant to "meet the brain halfway" - to equally learn how to interface with the individual's brain.

That said - it's only a matter of time until you are able to "expand your mind" into an implant. Having access to a digital processor would make math a matter of reading the problem and "seeing/understanding" the answer. You wouldn't have to think about math anymore than you had to think about the punch-line of a joke.

Of course - this is all made easier if you first have an understanding of math - so it would be likely that early-generation models would require an individual to know at least basic math in order to learn to interface with the device. A likely training process would be sitting in front of math problems and a visual output display of the 'answer' being provided by the device. As you read, it would display answers. This serves two purposes - first, you begin to recognize its response to your brain (some set of frequencies) as being certain numbers - and you begin to learn to control the device so that it understands what problem you are presenting to it.

We already have implants that allow quadriplegics to operate machinery with thought alone (it's still under development - but has been demonstrated with a few voluntary subjects) - the same has been done with a monkey. Other implants allow blind people to see (only those who developed the optical nerves, however - people blind at birth are a little out of luck, here).

We have the technology - it's just not yet marketable (too few people could afford it to make it and put it in the pharmacy).



posted on May, 31 2009 @ 02:00 AM
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The possibilities of this technology are mind boggling.

One things for sure, its coming and there's not much we can do to stop it.



posted on Jun, 1 2009 @ 09:08 AM
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Originally posted by Aim64C

Originally posted by Applesandoranges
The ending of it sounded scary what did she mean by brain implant?


We have the technology, now.

Unlike what we used to think - we've found that the brain is an extremely adaptive system. You can connect probes to any portion of your brain (well, technically, you don't even need to do that, newer technologies will allow monitoring of brain activity via a headband and altered LED technology) and use some logical method to illicit an output from the activity, and your brain will eventually learn to use something.

Now, obviously, attaching implants to regions of the brain that correspond with their desired function expedites the process. So does programming the implant to "meet the brain halfway" - to equally learn how to interface with the individual's brain.

That said - it's only a matter of time until you are able to "expand your mind" into an implant. Having access to a digital processor would make math a matter of reading the problem and "seeing/understanding" the answer. You wouldn't have to think about math anymore than you had to think about the punch-line of a joke.

Of course - this is all made easier if you first have an understanding of math - so it would be likely that early-generation models would require an individual to know at least basic math in order to learn to interface with the device. A likely training process would be sitting in front of math problems and a visual output display of the 'answer' being provided by the device. As you read, it would display answers. This serves two purposes - first, you begin to recognize its response to your brain (some set of frequencies) as being certain numbers - and you begin to learn to control the device so that it understands what problem you are presenting to it.

We already have implants that allow quadriplegics to operate machinery with thought alone (it's still under development - but has been demonstrated with a few voluntary subjects) - the same has been done with a monkey. Other implants allow blind people to see (only those who developed the optical nerves, however - people blind at birth are a little out of luck, here).

We have the technology - it's just not yet marketable (too few people could afford it to make it and put it in the pharmacy).


So in other words. You dont need to think much the computers sensor can do that for you. So its just like a way to shut down human thought further. So that man abilities are only reliant on machine to work it out for them. Which further the downgrading of human conciousness. So that only the computer can perfect human's natural abilities rather then the other way around. That man simply cannot gain entry to the ability they already have. This serves the purpose to destroy man's essence. This brain implant therfore is a manifestation of the ability already inherent in man. How would it be a boost when it serves to shut down human thought capabilites and creation. Creating of our own reality with thought.



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