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Dude! Quick, Suck This Dog's Nose!

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posted on May, 23 2009 @ 05:47 AM
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This is as real as it gets, kids....

Man Sucks Snake Venom From Dog's Nose

Now... I have rescued dogs with snakebite.

I rescued 2 golden retrievers that were snakebit up in the mountains last year. Pit Viper. One dog was bitten on the foot, the other was bitten on the nose.

Guess how I rescued them.

I walked them back to camp, patted them on the head, gave them some water and dry food to eat, dabbed a little antiseptic on the bite wounds, then lit a cigarette and smoked it.

The dogs were fine. They laid down and panted for a bit with fever, which is what dogs do, you know, then they got up and ate like pigs, drank a lot of water, then played their asses off.

Generally speaking, dogs have a natural immunity to snakebite. Of course, it varies with size and breed and all that. But the point of this thread is

DON'T SUCK
SNAKE VENOM
FROM A DOG'S NOSE

YOU OAF



This guy's stupidity depleted the local supply of antitoxin. Somebody else could have used that, Jethro.

— Doc Velocity




[edit on 5/23/2009 by Doc Velocity]




posted on May, 23 2009 @ 06:00 AM
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reply to post by Doc Velocity
 


Wow, that is a story that I will keep with me for along time.

More knowledge for my survival oriented brain.



posted on May, 23 2009 @ 06:15 AM
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Haha, I can't blame the guy since that's the ONLY way he really knew how to get rid of the snake venom. But at the same time, common sense would tell you that if you get it in your mouth, it's going to effect you haha. Great article though!



posted on May, 23 2009 @ 06:20 AM
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reply to post by Doc Velocity
 



your story is what is so funny, in what you have done with a dog. that is what makes me laugh.



posted on May, 23 2009 @ 06:21 AM
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All I have to say to you is - thank you for saving those dogs.

You are a hero.



posted on May, 23 2009 @ 06:55 AM
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Originally posted by Doc Velocity

Now... I have rescued dogs with snakebite.

I rescued 2 golden retrievers that were snakebit

Guess how I rescued them.

Generally speaking, dogs have a natural immunity to snakebite.



There are a ton of people that survive gunshot wounds, stabbings, and various poisonings every day.
Should we not bother acting to remove or fix whatever's harming them, or calling an ambulance/bringing them to a hospital just because a few heroic d-bags were able to stand around and watch their friend heal themselves?

Show us something that says 100% of dogs bit (on the face) by poisonous snakes have the ability to just sit there and recuperate without any real help before you go around flexing your oaf muscles.

Were the dogs' symptoms that you witnessed too much different from the symptoms of the nose-sucker's symptoms? Do you know for a fact that he absolutely needed the anti venom? Maybe the people that administered three doses of the $3500 fluid are the "OAFS?"
The guy probably could have sat around for a while, drank and ate a lot, and ran around for a while and been fine, just like the dogs you say you rescued.




[edit on 23-5-2009 by alaskan]



posted on May, 23 2009 @ 12:57 PM
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Originally posted by alaskan
There are a ton of people that survive gunshot wounds, stabbings, and various poisonings every day.

Okay, hotshot, let's see what sort of inane devil's advocate bullcrap you have on your plate...


Originally posted by alaskan
Should we not bother acting to remove or fix whatever's harming them, or calling an ambulance/bringing them to a hospital just because a few heroic d-bags were able to stand around and watch their friend heal themselves?

Dude. Get a grip on yourself. We're talking about a canine, not a human being. Dogs are snakebitten every day on every continent except Antarctica.

No, to answer your question, we should not interfere in Natural processes, because Nature always has the fastest and best solution in cases such as this. Either the dog dies (providing the viper is deadly enough, which is unlikely in North America), or the dog's immune system neutralizes the snake venom and the dog recovers quickly. Very simple.

Now, perhaps in your world or parallel universe or whatever, you give the dog Wilderness Emergency First Response, administer mouth-to-mouth, cryogenically freeze the dog, cultivate canine stem cells, and finally attach a bionic prosthesis to Fido's ass.

You know what I'm talking about. The half-baked Human impulse to SAVE EVERYTHING using our primitive science and medicine — which, so far, has only succeeded in overpopulating the planet with useless Human gutbags farting up the atmosphere.

No. This is real simple, chum. It's even "green," you might say. When the dog is snakebitten, it either lives or dies without your altruistic (and even quite mad) intervention.


Originally posted by alaskan
Show us something that says 100% of dogs bit (on the face) by poisonous snakes have the ability to just sit there and recuperate without any real help before you go around flexing your oaf muscles.

Good God, man, you want empirical evidence?? I defy you to show me 100% proof positive evidence of anything. Ha! We're talking about common sense, Einstein. Sheesh.

Fact is, domesticated dogs are the second most successful mammal on the planet. Do you know the first most successful mammal? That's right, it's Humans. Do you know the third most successful? It's domesticated cats. Yes, I'm making a point. The only reason that domesticated cats and dogs are so abundant and successful is because we humans brought them along on our ride to the top.

Which has produced a burgeoning overpopulation of cats and dogs, as well, yes? Which results in far worse quality of life for the millions of abandoned and homeless cats and dogs, yes?

Our impulse to SAVE every child and kitten and puppy is pushing this planet's resources to the breaking point. So let's practice with doggies and kitties first, shall we? When our dog — which has natural immunities to many things that we don't — is snakebitten, what do we do?

NO, we don't bundle it up in a space blanket and MedEvac the damned thing at a cost of $3000 per minute! Use your brain, man!

Yes, we give the dog a bowl of water, maybe dab a little antiseptic on the wound, and let Nature handle the rest. It's more humane.

This moron in Wyoming who sucked the poison out of a dog's nose, first of all, has been watching too many reruns of Daniel Boone from the 1960s. Lacerating a snake bite and applying oral suction is the worst possible thing you can do as First Response. In fact, it's retard response.

Second of all, this hick depleted the supply of local anti-venom by four vials, at a cost of $14,000 that he can't even afford to repay! All because of sheer stupidity.

Not ignorance, because the man is 50 years old. He acted impulsively, as so many gutbags do, did the wrong thing right out of the gate, almost got himself killed, diminished Emergency Response resources in his area... all for a dog that either would have died or recovered in a perfectly natural fashion if only the Human had not lost his wits.

— Doc Velocity





[edit on 5/23/2009 by Doc Velocity]



posted on May, 23 2009 @ 01:28 PM
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This is me rolling my eyes.



posted on May, 23 2009 @ 01:41 PM
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Who is to say the nature of a human's relationship with their animals? I have had pets that I cared for more than many people. Although you, OP, apparently don't choose to understand this, even though you've had dogs, for some people their pets are their family, their focus.

Incidentally, sucking venom and spitting it out is though to only induce a small amount of the venom to the .......... ummm........... suckee. I would certainly do this for someone I cared for, and probably for someone I didn't.

Where I grew up in northern Idaho, we had timber rattlers all over the place. As a kid I was outfitted with what amounted to gaiters made out of elkskin, for when I went hiking in the rocks or in the mountains. Rattlesnakes can control their venom realease, and don't always inject it as a means of warding of an "irrantant."

From you link:

He called 911 and asked the dispatcher to call his mother, Pat Shimic, and tell her what happened and to go to the veterinarian for anti-venom serum
............ so using this anti-venom FROM A VET wasn't necessarily depleting the stocks, was it? Are you suggesting that the @#$#@ VET had the only supply of antivenom in town? That is what it was THERE for -- animals.

I don't really have a sense of you OP, but it should be clear by now that what I really object to was your characterization of the person who did the best he could to save his dog as a "Jethro". You make it sound like he was a fool for trying to save his friend. Unlike you, who apparently put a little antiseptic on and had a smoke, watching to see if they died or not. What a good friend.

I'm glad you and I aren't neighbors. I like people around me that give a crap about more than themselves. If I've mischaracterized you, then let me hear why.



posted on May, 23 2009 @ 01:49 PM
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This moron in Wyoming who sucked the poison out of a dog's nose, first of all, has been watching too many reruns of Daniel Boone from the 1960s. Lacerating a snake bite and applying oral suction is the worst possible thing you can do as First Response. In fact, it's retard response.


No, it is not. If a human is bitten by a venomous snake, antivenom should be gotten to them as quickly as possible. Causing the human to have to move themselves to the antivenom could be fatal. In the absence of that action, temporarily halting the blood flow from the site of the bite, along with opening up the wound to allow outward blood flow, along with using suction to remove venom is a time-tried and verified method of saving a life.

you see, puncture wounds close over the flesh and don't tend toward flowing blood. There is a reason that snakebite kits that are STILL issued to government and military around the globe have a sharp razor knife and a suction device.

"retard response". Nice talk. .................. Einstein



posted on May, 23 2009 @ 03:31 PM
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We had a dog that may have died due to snakebite......we did not actually suspect that it was a snakebite till after his death.

He was ( along with our other dog) sniffing around a brush pile in the pasture, he suddenly let out a yip and headed toward the house with his tail between his legs. He hit his favorite leaf pile under one of the trees in the back yard, and refused to move. He would not come inside, would not come to eat and even refused treats we tried to hand feed him.

His only apparent injury was a fairly small scratch on the nose, which bled only a drop. He had no swelling around the injury, nor showed any signs of distress....no panting, no throwing up, no convulsions........we thought he'd nicked himself on blackberry thorns or maybe on the barbed wire fence.

He died three days later, and as far as we could tell, he never got up from his leaf pile, even to relieve himself.

He was young , had never had any health probs.......he was a sweet little mutt of a dog.....wish I'd thought about trying some sort of snake bite treatment.....it would have even been worth the nose sucking to have saved him.



posted on May, 23 2009 @ 06:01 PM
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Originally posted by argentus
Causing the human to have to move themselves to the antivenom could be fatal. In the absence of that action, temporarily halting the blood flow from the site of the bite, along with opening up the wound to allow outward blood flow, along with using suction to remove venom is a time-tried and verified method of saving a life.

Gonggggg... You just flunked out of Wilderness Emergency First Response, Jed. At no time should you lacerate the snakebite, spreading the venom and inviting entirely avoidable infection and necrosis. Suction devices damage tissue, spread the venom. Do your hiking buddies a favor and don't accompany them if the best you can offer them are antiquated and harmful folk remedies.

Nastiest bite of any animal in North America? Anybody? It's the Human bite — humans have incredibly bad diets and unnatural and ineffective oral hygiene, particularly when thrashing about in the wilderness for days at a time. You do not want a human mouth anywhere near a fresh wound, it'll go septic so fast it'll kill you.

Now, in case you're wondering, yes I am certified by the Red Cross in Wilderness Emergency First Response, including treatment of snakebites. First thing you do when a snakebite occurs? Record the TIME of the incident, because the clock is now ticking. Second, help victim into comfortable and relaxed position, keep him calm, try to elicit from him a description of the snake, and USE CELLPHONE to call local 911. Third, apply direct pressure to bite wound, preferably with a compress, and cinch wound directly with tourniquet. Fourth, apply tourniquets above and then below snake bite, constricting all tissue so there is no migration of venom. Fifth, if transportation is nearby, haul the victim out of the situation and seek ER. If no transportation is available, USE CELLPHONE to call local 911 and stay with victim, or leave victim provisioned and go seek help.

That's how you keep somebody alive, not by slashing and sucking at a toxic wound like a drunken ghoul, for godsake.

Now as to my "relationships" with animals... I've owned dozens of pets of all different kinds in my life, and I'm well aware of how some people tend to blur the distinction between human and animal needs, placing the Human needs above the best interests of the animal.

For example, when your little Fluffy develops esophageal cancer and is quite obviously dying, the selfish pet owner pays thousands and thousands of bucks for advanced veterinary treatment and surgeries and feeding tubes and so on and so forth, squeezing every last precious moment of personal pleasure out of the tortured animal. This is sick beyond reason.

And I know it's sick because I did it several times, trying to hold onto a dog or a cat or a horse or a bushbaby for just a few more days or months or whatever. I put the animals through hell to console myself. That's selfish and sick.

See, animals don't fear death as we do, they don't perceive illness and injury in the same way. Amputate a human's leg, and the human thinks his world has ended, he needs physical and psychological therapy and counseling, and he may not recover from his loss for a year or more. Cut off a dog's leg, and that dog will be walking by morning, resuming its life immediately.

Animals know when their time is up, and they accept death as the cycle of living that it is. I've seen old dogs go curl up and die without warning. A terminally ill cat will go and hide and wait quietly for death. They know when the jig is up.

Only Humans think they can cheat death — which they can't — through their magic potions and oh-so-overrated technology. Which would be fine if we only lied to and tortured ourselves... Unfortunately, we love to commiserate, dragging down others with us in our fear of death, subjecting even our pets to the dreadful ordeal of massaging the human ego.

— Doc Velocity



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