Galactic Center of milky way [Video]

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posted on May, 18 2009 @ 04:25 PM
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reply to post by 420prajna
 


Yea, the center and a lot of the stars within it (even though there are many) are obscured by the foreground stars, interstellar dust, and nebulae(as you said
). Of course we couldn't see the black hole in the center unless we were viewing in heavy x-ray or gamma spectrum, only then we would still only see the effects of it or its plasma jets. We also can not see the galactic bulge well either, which is a shame because ones in other galaxies look pretty cool.

[edit on 5/18/2009 by jkrog08]




posted on May, 18 2009 @ 04:37 PM
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being a Texas native, i can say that this does not surprise me one bit. all the "Texas is better than where ever you are from" aside, there are vast expanses in the Big Bend country that are ideal for this. On a good, cold night you can see an amazing light show.

[edit on 18-5-2009 by bigfatfurrytexan]



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 07:02 PM
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reply to post by jkrog08
 
That's now my new background.

I took a girl to the Davis Mountains in 1993, pulled off the road near McDonald Observatory, and retracted the covertible top on my car.

The view was breathtaking! She'd lived in a city all her life and had never seen the sky without light pollution.

She fell in love with the night sky and stars and me.

We've been married 17 years now, and I'll be back there this fall.

Star and flag.

jw



[edit on 18-5-2009 by jdub297]



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 07:14 PM
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Originally posted by breakingdradles
I didn't realize you could see things like that without telescopes!
I need to get out of the city!


You should find a planetarium near you, or get about 50 miles from city lights. No telescope needed, and it won't help much if you're in a metro area with light pollution.

I can do this in Texas pretty easily, but it may be diificult for you and others.

Find the closest farming area and get deep into rural roads (take a map and flashlighgt! or scout it in daylight - you will not be disappointed)

good luck

jw



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 08:14 PM
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reply to post by jdub297
 


Glad to hear it and I am glad the picture I posted is your new wallpaper!



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 09:35 PM
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WOW!

The most amazing thing I have seen on this site...

Thanks for sharing...



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 10:08 PM
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reply to post by radio_for_peace
 


reply to post by radio_for_peace
 


we're talking about the center of the galaxy...

not Venus...

why do you call this the story of Lucifer?


by the way, GREAT find, AlwaysQuestion!

[edit on 18-5-2009 by adrenochrome]



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 10:14 PM
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Kinda looks more like a Galactic Vagina from our perspective!
I that where we're from?


Awesome video, S + F



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 10:16 PM
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Now that is special.

Dam, we're so small...



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 10:59 PM
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I thiink adding the specs to his time lapse video was great. from OP's Source video:


vimeo.com...

11 days ago


William Castleman 11 days ago
The time-lapse sequence was taken with the simplest equipment that I brought to the star party. I put the Canon EOS-5D (AA screen modified to record hydrogen alpha at 656 nm) with an EF 15mm f/2.8 lens on a weighted tripod. Exposures were 20 seconds at f/2.8 ISO 1600 followed by 40 second interval. Exposures were controlled by an interval timer shutter release (Canon TC80N3). Power was provided by a Hutech EOS203 12v power adapter run off a 12v deep cycle battery. Large jpg files shot in custom white balance were batch processed in Photoshop (levels, curves, contrast, Noise Ninja noise reduction, resize) and assembled in Quicktime Pro. Editing/assembly was with Sony Vegas Movie Studio 9.


42 minutes ago

William Castleman 42 minutes ago
The stock anti-alias (AA) filter blocks a range of red wavelengths so the camera will render desireable skin tones. 656 nm is one of those wavelengths that also is emitted by emission nebula (star forming gas nebula). The replacement filter permits passage of 656 nm so that emission nebula can be recorded.

there you have it.


[edit on 18-5-2009 by imd12c4funn]



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 10:59 PM
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reply to post by jkrog08
 


so its like the core view, of our leg of the spiral, not the actual center"black hole" center. right
great vid, AWESTRUCK!!



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 11:11 PM
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See that dark rift running down the center, THATS what your seeing. I've lived in Texas for almost twenty years and this is visible all the time outside the major city limits or light pollution if thats what you want to call it. I wish everyone could see it with their own eyes for it is truly an amazing thing to see.



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 11:15 PM
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reply to post by AlwaysQuestion
 


Wow that was awesome!! Never get to see it like that! In the grand scheme of things it goes to show us how small we really are!!

Thanks for sharing!!



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 11:16 PM
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Star and Flagged, 1 word Amazing!!!!

Just one extra thought though,.

Mayan Calander ends at 21 / 12 / 2012 They seemed to have significance to this, i wonder what this view of the stars looked like back in their day? and why did there mathamatical calculations seem to end on this date? im still trying to work it out. Because there maths for their calander evolved around sites like this.
Great find..



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 11:18 PM
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We are approaching the tail of the dragon so will be able to view the center
as posted;more to come.
Interesting that the best view is right before sunrise; best time to view Nibiru very close to the sun.



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 11:18 PM
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I have seen many pictures like this but the video takes the cake!

One question though, if we can see stars like this from earth through the atmosphere, why then can we not see them from space via the shuttle cameras?

I just ask cause I've been watching alot of the NASA channel lately.
Again, excellent video!



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 11:22 PM
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That is incredible. Thanks for sharing.

When/where do I have to be to see this for myself? Is there a special locale? I get the concept that I won't be able to see it from the Vegas Strip or Times Square, but can I see it near Cape Canaveral, Florida?

Thanks again.



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 11:24 PM
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absolutely breathtaking... just...wow....



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 11:37 PM
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To elaborate on my previous post


PREVIOUS POST
===========================
Star and Flagged, 1 word Amazing!!!!

Just one extra thought though,.

Mayan Calander ends at 21 / 12 / 2012 They seemed to have significance to this, i wonder what this view of the stars looked like back in their day? and why did there mathamatical calculations seem to end on this date? im still trying to work it out. Because there maths for their calander evolved around sites like this. Great find..
==============


(Taken from Wikipedia)


Jenkins suggests that the Maya based their calendar on observations of the "dark rift", a band of black dust clouds in the Milky Way, which the Maya called the Xibalba be or Black Road. Jenkins claims that the Maya were aware of where the ecliptic intersected the Black Road and gave this position in the sky a special significance in their cosmology. According to the theory, the Sun precisely aligns with this intersection point at the winter solstice of 2012. Jenkins is credited with the premise that the classical Mayans anticipated this conjunction and celebrated it as the harbinger of a profound spiritual transition for mankind.New Age proponents of the galactic alignment theory argue that, just as astrology uses the positions of stars and planets to predict the future, the Mayans plotted their calendars with the objective of preparing for significant world events.

Criticism Regarding this
(Also taken from Wikipedia)

Critics suggest that fears about 2012 should be tempered by the fact that the alignment in question takes place over a 36-year period, corresponding to the diameter of the Sun, with the most precise convergence having already occurred without incident in 1998 Also, Jenkins himself notes that there is no concrete evidence that the Maya were aware of precession.


But my take on it is there calendar is very accurate, and there long cycle which ends 21 / 12 / 2012 is based on a different observation of the stars. And not the one critics are seem to be criticizing.

Maybe there calculations are made from these sort of rare views.

vimeo.com...

Just a thought



[edit on 18-5-2009 by theflashor]



posted on May, 18 2009 @ 11:40 PM
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I've done this with my Canon gear and what you get is much more than what your eyes can see at that time you are out there. Your eyes just cannot compete with these new sensors. I used a 16,000,0000 pixel canon and it always surprises me with what it brings home. I bought a night scope to view through my Canon video setup and I would say my still Canon will see as much as my night vision scope will, course it will see UV light but as far as just seeing tons of dots, stars, the still Canon is just as good if not capturing more. So get outside on a clear night and see what you can do with whatever camera you have. Only extra you need is a tripod.





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