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Hubble and other telescopes

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posted on Apr, 20 2009 @ 03:00 AM
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Ok this may be an easy answer for some, and I haven't done enough research to know, but if we can see other galaxies and stars with such clarity and beauty with telescopes like Hubble, than why can't we use it to view the planets of our solar system?

I mean down to the valleys of Mars or Venus or into the gases of Jupiter? If we have these telescopes, why do we even bother sending probes and the like to these planets to get pictures?

This may be a stupid question, but I if you don't ask, you don't learn. Are the telescopes too close to get a clear pic, or are the Hubble pictures artist modified?

Thanks for any response.
Gnosis111




posted on Apr, 20 2009 @ 04:27 AM
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Im just stabbing in the dark here cuz I'm bored with the last 30mins of work...but im thinking...

Aren't those Images that Hubble captures composite images? Something like, the Telescope records all sorts of gamma rays and other spectrum light and then the scientists on the ground put all that data into a form of an image?

Or maybe those planets in our solar system are just so close that it is impossible for Hubble to focus on such a close object (similar to trying to read a book with a pair of binoculars)

Will have to check out the wiki on it later



posted on Apr, 20 2009 @ 04:49 AM
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I'm not entirely sure, but I thought that it was because the Hubble was too powerful to be observing object in our solar system for them being 'too close'. Similar to when you try to view too close of an object with a pair of binoculars, but on a much larger scale.



posted on Apr, 20 2009 @ 04:50 AM
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reply to post by gnosis111
 


Here's some pictures taken by Hubble from our Solar System:

hubblesite.org...

Technical specifications of Hubble just aren't that good for taking pictures of planets, we have other methods (telescopes) for that and Hubble isn't one of them.

Basically, time that astronomers are granted for Hubble is limited and is reserved for those objects that are difficult to observe with ground telescopes. That is why they don't use Hubble for taking pictures of planets in our Solar System.

Tthink about it. There are far away objects that are impossible to have clear pictures taken by ground telescopes, only Hubble can do it. However, we CAN take clear pictures of our planets with other telescopes. It is then only logical that observation time of Hubble is used for those objects that aren't clear with groundbased telescopes. There is only one Hubble and only 365 days in a year, that time is wasted if it is used for objects that can be observed with ground based telescopes.



posted on Apr, 20 2009 @ 02:43 PM
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reply to post by rawsom
 


I guess my only argument to that is, why concern ourselves with anything BUT our solar system? And my question was more to why can't we view close ups of our planets, extreme close ups, with crisp clarity? Hubble should be able to do that shouldn't it? Our land based telescopes have to battle with the atmosphere and air debris.

Like I said before, I am far from knowledgeable on this subject.


jra

posted on Apr, 21 2009 @ 10:01 PM
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Originally posted by gnosis111
And my question was more to why can't we view close ups of our planets, extreme close ups, with crisp clarity? Hubble should be able to do that shouldn't it? Our land based telescopes have to battle with the atmosphere and air debris.


Because there are physical limitations. If you want to get super detailed images of another planets surface. The best way is to have a satellite orbiting the planet you want to see in detail. If you want to do it from Earth or Earth orbit, you're going to need an incredibly huge telescope.

For example, if you want to get detailed images of the left over Apollo equipment on the Moon from Earth. You're going to need a telescope with a mirror that's about 200m in diameter or more. Hubble's mirror is a little over 2m in diameter. So no, Hubble cannot get extreme close-ups of other planets.



posted on Apr, 22 2009 @ 02:11 AM
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reply to post by jra
 


Ok that makes sense, but then how do we get such beautiful pictures of galaxies and stars from hundreds even thousands of light years away?



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