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UFO spotted in South Harrow

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posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 12:13 PM
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reply to post by greeneyedleo
 


thanks greeneyedleo for that photo and i have to admit ,that explanation seems plausible but isn't that picture you posted a night time capture ?

would or could the same effect occur in a daytime capture if it was a helicopter ?

also i was in somewhat of agreement with Ziggystar60 that it could be just a crack in the cloud cover. could it be just an over exposed capture of the sun peeking thru the clouds ?




posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 12:30 PM
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Originally posted by bluedrake
What i don't get is, if aliens are so sophisticated that they can travel all the way to earth... Then why don't they turn off their lights when they get here so we can see them?

Surely if they wanted to be seen that much they would make a bigger statement than just lights in the sky, and im sure they must know how to hide their ships from eye site.



Because the see no reason what so ever to hide anymore. You will eventually find out why.



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 01:09 PM
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reply to post by easynow
 




could it be just an over exposed capture of the sun peeking thru the clouds ?


According to the source, the photo was taken after sunset: 7.45pm on March 31

In the UK, here is the time of sunset on that date (which occurred before the photo was allegedly taken):



Mar 31, 2009 7:32 PM

www.timeanddate.com...



Another similar affect with similar cloud coverage:



Here is a photo of a copter light (but with no long exposure) under similar lightening conditions:







[edit on 4/7/2009 by greeneyedleo]



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 01:32 PM
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reply to post by greeneyedleo
 



good post and thanks for the sunset time confirmation. that was the part i was fuzzy on. i can now see some similarity in the color of the backgrounds so that is leading me to believe this is most likely a case of mis- identification (or a hoax) by the photographer.



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 02:07 PM
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reply to post by greeneyedleo
 


I agree with you, I think you have found the explanation for what we see in the photo.

The article in Harrow Observer says the photo was taken "about" 7.45 pm, but it has also been posted at "flickr", and there we can find very spesific info about the time it was taken. And the time makes it unlikely that it was crepuscular rays:


This Alien ship i spotted outside my window on the 31st march 2009 at 7:45:57 pm. The light coming from this thing is something i have never seen the like. i dont think any aircraft has a light like this. And moments after this shot the object seemed to quickly fade in light and travel above at high speed. i did not hear any loud sound but i did hear a whistle kind of sound. i am still shocked.

this was after sunset.
aperture fully open
medium slow shutter
high iso above 1000
no flash
climb angle 45 degree
height above 3000 metre
acceleration -- very fast.

www.flickr.com...



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 02:20 PM
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reply to post by ziggystar60
 


That wasn't there originally, he's added it.

The high-iso vs. noise is excellent on the D90 (here's a compare with Nikon's top of the line full-frame D3x), so I can buy that it could have been fairly high iso.

But for an enthusiast photographer he's incredibly light on detail (maybe he'll add to it as I type this), for instance:



aperture fully open
medium slow shutter


Is virtually meaningless. The widest aperture varies from lens to lens (that's the number after the F in lens specs e.g. 50mm/F1.2 or, in the case of a popular Nikon zoom, the first number is the widest aperture at 18mm end and the second the long end: 18-200mm/F3.5-5.6). So without knowing which lens it could be a number of apertures.

And medium slow shutter is just as meaningless, because does he mean for the camera, in general, or for that ISO setting, etc. etc. It's like a percentage without telling people exactly what you've measured.



posted on Apr, 7 2009 @ 03:04 PM
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I don't think its crepuscular rays - and the time of day, just after sunset, would tend to rule them out anyway.

However, there is as all to often in alleged UFO pictures no context whatsoever - making the picture effectively meaningless. The light may be 2ft above a house of high overhad, a metre wide or a mile wide. We cannot possibly say.

The fact that a setting of iso1000 was used does raise the strong possiblity that whatever it is is over-exposed thus further complicating matters.

Why are UFO pictures only ever taken by people who know nothing about photography, don't even seem to know how to use their cameras, and especially are only ever capable of taking just one picture? I know sometimes objects may move fast but if you capture a close up, zoom out and give us context, even if the object has since disappeared. Easy really.



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