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Bright star half full?

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posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 08:19 AM
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Isn't venus only supposed to be visable in the early morning hours?
This one is seen through the night.
I must admit that the pic. provided does look like what I am seeing.
I am just thinking that the timeing is wrong.




posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 10:15 AM
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Originally posted by AllTiedTogether
I'd have to say that unless someone gets a real professional astronomer to check this out we will all be wondering... right?

No, there's no question in my mind that it's venus.


I mean ngc appears to be an astronomer but would you use his word to confirm that it's what he says or would you ask for proof? Wouldn't it take a picture from an astronomer to prove he saw an asteroid?

I showed you a picture, why isn't that good enough? I told you I used my telescope to slew to Venus, why is that not good enough?


Noone, not even those that have the stellarium program or any other program that plots the sky has come out and said that it perfectly matched this or that and provided a picture to confirm. Why? because they can't confirm, because they don't know.

Or maybe you're setting the burden of proof in the wrong place. I told you I confirmed it was Venus. Now if you want to say it DOES NOT match in spite of my scope saying otherwise, I'd like to ask you to provide some proof that it's not Venus. I even gave you the links to software that you could use to confirm it for yourself, I did that for your benefit, not so that you could demand more proof.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 10:19 AM
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Originally posted by AllTiedTogether
This proof would be in having pictures that could match where these starcharts put the celestial bodies at any given time.

I gave you an up close photo, taken by a telescope that automatically found the object. I'd say that's a higher standard of evidence than a wide angle photo matching a star chart. You could just check the star chart against the sky for yourself, but I'll tell you what, since you think I'm lying for some strange reason, I'll do a live webcast sometime this week where I'll slew the telescope to Venus and broadcast the feed from the scope live online. Will that settle it for everyone here once and for all?



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 10:21 AM
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Originally posted by only onus
Isn't venus only supposed to be visable in the early morning hours?

No, Venus is only visable just after sunset right now. Later this year it will orbit around to be visible just before sunrise. It's cyclical.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 10:23 AM
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reply to post by Winsor
 


My scope's an 8" Meade Classic LX200 Schmidt-Cassegrain.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 11:05 AM
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Recently I have noticed a "bright star". I am located in northern NY and am viewing this star from my window in a south westerly direction.

It does not appear to be very near the horizon. I do not know scientific terms so it would seem to me to be about half way between the horizon and overhead.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 11:37 AM
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Originally posted by Mahree
Recently I have noticed a "bright star". I am located in northern NY and am viewing this star from my window in a south westerly direction.

It does not appear to be very near the horizon. I do not know scientific terms so it would seem to me to be about half way between the horizon and overhead.


Overhead is the Zenith, the horizon is 0 degrees. Halfway is 45 degrees. What's your latitude? Northern New York is probably around 44 degrees north depending on where in "northern" New York you are.


What time are you seeing the star?



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 12:09 PM
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My latitude is 44.808.

I will check out that "star" more closely tonight. Seeing this star so bright made me curious. That is why I stopped to read this thread.



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 04:41 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


OK... I'm not saying that you are untrustworthy... What I am saying is that the picture you provided with no parameters documented to describe what we are seeing is not proof.

I realize that you may be a very good amateur astronomer given the type of equipment you have. Nice scope... but that doesn't prove anything. Just like if a professional astronomer came on and even proved his credentials and made a statement like yours, I would again expect some data to accompany the pictures. Sorry if that seems too demanding but I've been witness to a lot of deceit on the ATS board, as I'm sure you have noticed yourself, so I will not believe someone's statement as being fact without the facts.

Should you provide the data that would be required to correctly identify your sighting, then I would take the data and compare it with someone else who may have seen it at approximately the same time. This would assist in identing the thing.

Actually if about three or four of the astronomers on this board would make a thread and do an experiment that others around the world could be apart of that would prove conclusively that this is a planet.

WoW! There is the solution. Now who is going to be the first astronomer to start a thread on this ground-breaking research????

Come on, take up the challenge... It will be the experience of our lifetime... I can write the report if nobody else wants to... I did that for a living my last two years in the military....

I'm quite experienced in the conspiracy department because I have been a part of a considerable amount of them without knowing until recently.... but I don't expect you to believe that without evidence.... Of that I won't provide... so please do continue to have the idea that I don't really know much about what I write...

Rgds


[edit on 14-2-2009 by AllTiedTogether]



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 04:53 PM
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Originally posted by AllTiedTogether
reply to post by ngchunter
 


OK... I'm not saying that you are untrustworthy... What I am saying is that the picture you provided with no parameters documented to describe what we are seeing is not proof.

What parameters would be sufficient for you then? I explained the process, but if there's some detail you have questions about then go ahead and ask.


Nice scope... but that doesn't prove anything.

Considering the scope knows where venus should be and finds it for me, lo and behold it is the "bright star" being described, I'd say that's sufficient proof. I'm willing to give a live webcast demonstration for you though to settle any lingering doubts people seem to have.


Should you provide the data that would be required to correctly identify your sighting,

I still don't understand what form you think that data should take. I will give a live demonstration showing that my scope is actually finding Venus and reconfirm through the scope that it is Venus in the field of view, which will be broadcast live. I can only hope you'll finally accept that as definite proof. I'll provide details shortly as to when it will occur. I can be flexible so let me know what day works well for you, but it must occur during my local early evening since that's when Venus is visible for me.


Actually if about three or four of the astronomers on this board would make a thread and do an experiment that others around the world could be apart of that would prove conclusively that this is a planet.

WoW! There is the solution. Now who is going to be the first astronomer to start a thread on this ground-breaking research????

Unnecessary. Confirming that Venus is at these coordinates only takes one astronomer, trying to raise the bar arbitrarily is not necessary nor helpful.

With the mods' permission, I would like to use an ATS chat room for communication during the webcast. All who are present will be able to view it simultaneously, and that way I can communicate directly with the viewers in realtime.

*edit to add:
So that you understand what this webcast will consist of, one camera will be pointed at me and my scope, a second camera will be in the scope itself and showing a live view of what the scope is seeing. Both will be visible simultaneously in a split-screen presentation. I will show that I have commanded the scope to slew to Venus by showing the hand controller, and then you will be able to see the scope slewing to venus both from outside the scope and inside the scope. I will then confirm that Venus is at the appropriate location in the sky, right where the bright star is located.

[edit on 14-2-2009 by ngchunter]



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 05:31 PM
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reply to post by ngchunter
 


Parameters would be

- time of photo
- your exact position lat/long
- azimuth/degree on telescope
- camera settings

Other data would probably be needed to compare against another picture from somewhere else. It may be good if someone provided all the parameters above for pictures covering an evening of this thing moving in the sky. Time lapse covering the entire viewing time.... Most people have been experiencing clear skies apparently.

I'll start a thread called " Attention Astronomers - What is that Bright Light in the Sky?"

Watch for it and I'll put together all the data needed for a serious astronomer to follow through on an experiment...

Rgds



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 05:52 PM
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reply to post by AllTiedTogether
 


www.jackstargazer.com...

STAR GAZER 5 MINUTE
Episode # 09-05 / 1626th Show
To Be Aired : Monday 2/02/2009 through
Sunday 2/08/2009
"The Goddess Of Love And The Valentine's Day Star
Await Your Viewing Valentine's Night"

Star Gazer is a five-minute astronomy show on public television hosted by 70-year old[1] Jack Foley Horkheimer, executive director of the Miami Space Transit Planetarium[



posted on Feb, 14 2009 @ 06:15 PM
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reply to post by Pauligirl
 


Thank you but I don't think it's describing the same thing....

I don't dispute that beetlejuice is seen or viewed by many around the world, but I do dispute the fact that those who have actually said what it is have actually stated a number of things. Not just one.... And some of these are apparently astronomy buffs.

So, please do look up this valentines day and kiss your sweety under bettlejuice or whatever, but what is the other thing beside it that someone else is calling a comet, or planet venus or jupiter..., a weather balloon etc.

Now some may laugh at the weather balloon theory but is it any more ridiculous than some of the comments placed by other astronomy buffs. I mean the fact that someone states they are interested in astronomy would lead one to believe that the basics of astronomy, providing and using coordinates and how to provide details for substantiation of claims, would be the most basic.

"Hey I saw a comet here and it was there two days ago."
A little lacking in the details dept ...
if you know what I mean..

nudge dudge.. wink wink..

rgds



posted on Feb, 15 2009 @ 08:38 AM
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Originally posted by AllTiedTogether
reply to post by ngchunter
 


Parameters would be

- time of photo
- your exact position lat/long
- azimuth/degree on telescope
- camera settings

The fact that my telescope found venus confirms 3 out of 4 are satisfactory, the last one only determines quality of the resulting photo, which you can judge for yourself. I could dig up what the numbers were for the original photo when I get back to my desktop computer, but I'll provide all this info again for you at the live webcast. You'll be able to see that I told the telescope to go to Venus, you'll see the coordinates are correct, you'll see the time, of course, and I'll explain the camera settings (it will be a different kind camera suited for streaming live video).

What day would work well for you? The webcast must occur sometime between about 6:30pm eastern and about 9:30pm. Name the day and I'll do it, provided the weather cooperates. If you don't want to participate, that's fine, I'll just name the day myself.

[edit on 15-2-2009 by ngchunter]



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