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Possible UFO crash in Saudi Arabia - Millions Of Witnesses!!

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posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 08:50 PM
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Continued from previous post...


Originally posted by zorgon
I do not believe this to be a 'normal' set of events


As above, see Phage's post - there is nothing abnormal about this set of events, apart from the fact that we got to hear about them.

This is an extract from an article about an event that happened over the US in 2001:

Happens all the time

Space rocks fall through Earth's atmosphere regularly, and most pose little or no threat as they vaporize in the atmosphere, due to the intense heat created by friction as they speed Earthward at thousands of miles per hour.

Some do fall to Earth. Some 400 tons of debris -- small rocks and dust -- rains down on Earth daily. But since the planet is about two-third's water, many fireballs and impacts are never noticed.

Source: Space.com




posted on Jan, 20 2009 @ 09:39 PM
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Originally posted by Nineteen
reply to post by defcon5
 


Meteors don't make loud noises in the sky do they?????


ya they do sometimes

once i saw a meteor Explode in mid air, it lit the entire sky up for at least 5 to 8 seconds, despite it was 3am at night, it became bright as day for a moment

when it exploded it caused a loud bang, then cracking sounds

yes crackling sounds



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 12:05 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Let's be clear here, I didn't "predict" anything. I said that 5 of these fireballs in a week is so far outside the statistical norm, that it cannot be coincidental.

I am no stranger to meteors and meteorites. I have observed thousands of them in my lifetime. I would like to say that I have never seen one of the magnitude of these reports. A meteor of that size that either explodes near the ground, or actually stikes the ground, is RARE. Very rare on the order of one every couple of years. To have 5 inside a week? That is nearly impossible odds.

I mentioned in an earlier post that the Saudi footage immediately reminded me of the SCUDs launched during the first Gulf War. I still think that video looks much more like a missile than a meteor.

So, in light of that, I stand by my opinion that what is being observed are missile intercepts during a military test. I also find it very interesting that most of the observed "meteors" are either over water or very near water. This is exactly what you would see with a sea based interceptor.



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 01:51 AM
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reply to post by lunarminer
 


The so called Saudi footage that they posted here is fake. This footage is actually from 2006 in Australia. SCUD missile?? Lunarminer, please tell me which Saudi footage you were referring to?



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 02:05 AM
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reply to post by TrueBrit
 


Strangely this particular meteor, the Saudi one, showed up an hour later in Indonesia......mmmmm



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 02:08 AM
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Originally posted by stewartw2
reply to post by TrueBrit
 


Strangely this particular meteor, the Saudi one, showed up an hour later in Indonesia......mmmmm


Quite a LEAP to boldly claim that this was a meteor, wouldn't you agree?

If not, can you prove that it was indeed simply an astronomical event?



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 02:10 AM
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reply to post by Majorion
 


That was my point.



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 02:19 AM
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Originally posted by stewartw2
reply to post by Majorion
 


That was my point.


Oops, sorry I often get confused by all the sarcasm on ATS, my mistake!

Your sarcasm is well warranted, I don't see any info to conclude that this was a meteor yet. Amazing how fast the debunkers jump on this thread before anything is even confirmed or denied.



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 02:44 AM
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Did everyone patting themselves on the back about firguring out it was a meteor read this at the ops link?




Note: A video initially linked here has been confirmed to have no connection to this event as was represented in various Saudi media channels. The video has therefore been removed as irrelevant to this story. The video in question was of a meteor sighting in Australia in 2006. Thanks to reader David Moore of Freemantle WA for pointing this out to us. Should a genuine video come to light we will add a link.


Do meteors make loud sounds?



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 02:49 AM
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reply to post by shug7272
 


Do they show up half way around the world an hour later??

[edit on 21-1-2009 by stewartw2]



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 02:53 AM
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reply to post by stewartw2
 


Are meteors censored from US media??



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 08:30 AM
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Thats definately a meteor.



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 09:06 AM
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Originally posted by lunarminer
reply to post by Phage
 


Let's be clear here, I didn't "predict" anything. I said that 5 of these fireballs in a week is so far outside the statistical norm, that it cannot be coincidental.

I am no stranger to meteors and meteorites. I have observed thousands of them in my lifetime. I would like to say that I have never seen one of the magnitude of these reports. A meteor of that size that either explodes near the ground, or actually stikes the ground, is RARE. Very rare on the order of one every couple of years. To have 5 inside a week? That is nearly impossible odds.


It's not out of the statistical norm at all. Did you actually look at the data that Phage posted (and my posts) above?

If not, then do so, and digest it with this in mind:


1. Fireball brightness is not a valid predictor of probability of meteorite production. The Halliday study found that, perhaps surprisingly, meteorites resulted from fireballs at least as faint as -6 apparent magnitude, and a typical meteorite producing fireball is only -9 magnitude. Many of the brightest and most spectacular fireballs did not produce meteorites.

Source: MIAC

You also seem to be confused about how meteorites reach the ground. Meteors in the size range we are talking about here (approximately 0.25-5m), if they do survive re-entry, are slowed down to free fall speed many km above the ground. The have stopped producing light by this time, and fall to the ground in the part of the phase known as 'dark flight'.
The atmosphere is very efficient at slowing down meteoroids to a velocity at which they can survive all the way down to the ground, and this happens more than most realize!



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 09:19 AM
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do you guys read the news...the video is from australia 2006



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 09:29 AM
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Originally posted by stewartw2
reply to post by TrueBrit
 


Strangely this particular meteor, the Saudi one, showed up an hour later in Indonesia......mmmmm


You're implying that because meteors can not re-enter over two different areas, that this could not have been a meteor? Have you considered that two separate events could be responsible?



Originally posted by shug7272
Do meteors make loud sounds?


Yes they can.


7. Production of nonelectrophonic (typical thunder like) sound is a powerful indicator that meteorites have been produced, since it indicates that the meteor has gotten to the lower atmosphere. The time between fireball and sound (typically tens of seconds to minutes) can be used to establish a distance to the meteor. The occurrence of electrophonic (near instantaneous) hissing or staccato sounds which occur simultaneously with the fireball is not an indicator of low penetration and likely meteorites (it is believed that these sounds are electromagnetic waves transduced to sound by nearby objects).

Source: MIAC


Originally posted by stewartw2
reply to post by stewartw2
 


Are meteors censored from US media??


No. Have you tried searching for reports?! There are plenty of reports of meteors that have been reported in the US mainstream media in the past!

As explained before, there is no known footage of this event, so you are not going to see it in the mainstream media. Events 1/2 way round the world, with no footage are not deemed newsworthy. This has always been the case, and it's only recently that events like this are getting reported. Before now, there were not as many CCTV cameras etc. around, and without footage...



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 10:10 AM
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On the same subject of meteors ,check this out.It looks like a meteor or something clips the sun and carries on into space.



huge ufo literally bouncing off the sun.this has been studied and studied and is not a flare, a blip or optical ilusion, plus considering the sun is so much bigger than earth.. this object must be HUGE






posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 10:30 AM
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reply to post by C.H.U.D.
 


If the reports were simply, "large fireballs" I would agree. However, an exploding Boloid that comes close to the earth is rare. As I pointed out one of these every couple of years is video taped. Five within a week? Show me a stat that verifies that this has ever happened.

By the way, if you still stand on the stats that Phage put up. The stats clearly show about 1 a month over North America. Five in a week worldwide? That still seems a bit high, especially when 3 of the five were over Europe.



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 10:32 AM
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reply to post by tarifa37
 


Quite a discussion in progress
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 11:58 AM
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Originally posted by lunarminer
If the reports were simply, "large fireballs" I would agree. However, an exploding Boloid that comes close to the earth is rare.


You are very mistaken. Yes, it's rare for a meteor to be luminous all the way down to the ground, but as I explained above, many reach Earth after having gone through a 'dark flight' phase.



Originally posted by lunarminer
As I pointed out one of these every couple of years is video taped.


Wrong! Things have changed dramatically over the past few years. There are many more CCTV cameras, fireball recording networks, etc than there were before. You would expect that more of these events would be captured now, than in the past!


Originally posted by lunarminer
Five within a week? Show me a stat that verifies that this has ever happened.


No need - Phage already did!



Originally posted by lunarminer
By the way, if you still stand on the stats that Phage put up. The stats clearly show about 1 a month over North America. Five in a week worldwide? That still seems a bit high, especially when 3 of the five were over Europe.


Last January there were 3 large events over North America according to the data that Phage provided. Even if North America was 1/2 of the area of our planet, that would suggest at least 6 large events around the world. Of course, North America is much less area than 50% of the Earth's surface, so this figure is EXTREMELY conservative.

5 large fireballs is nothing for a month, especially at this time of year when the frequency of fireballs is at it's highest in the Northern hemisphere.

A question similar to yours came up a few weeks back on the Meteor Observers mailing list and Ed Majden who is one of our most experienced meteor observes and runs the Sandia Bolide Detection Station replied with the following answer:


I'm not convinced that there is an increase in fireball activity in
recent years, perhaps more reporting of such events. The now
terminated Canadian MORP System directed by Dr. Ian Halliday, NRCC,
was in operation across the three Prairie Provinces from 1985 to
March 1971 with some cameras operating in 1970. This network
recorded 754 fireball class meteors over an approximate 14 year
period. This works out to approximately 53 fireballs per year or 1+
per week. With this in mind you are hearing reports of fireball
activity spread across the country and also internationally.
Spectacular events also see an increase of reporting of bright
meteors. Some of these are not fireball class meteors. I have had
many such reports and after checking my Sandia All-sky Camera tapes
many of these are not recorded so they must have been fainter than
-3.0 magnitude the approximate recording sensitivity of the old
Sandia Convex All-Sky cameras. The new fisheye systems are a bit
more sensitive.

Source: METEOROBS


If there was something unusual going on, don't you think the meteor observing community would be 'going nuts'? Have a look yourself: Meteor Observers mailing list

If you want to keep believing that there is something unusual going on, then by all means do so, but be aware that it's only you and a few others on here that hold that view, and the vast majority, scientific community included think that nothing out of the ordinary (as far as fireball frequency is concerned) is going on.

Phage and myself have provided lots of data here that supports this. If you want to keep insisting your personal views are right, then either back them up with data or stop clogging up this thread with erroneous statements and personal opinions.


[edit on 21-1-2009 by C.H.U.D.]



posted on Jan, 21 2009 @ 04:49 PM
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reply to post by C.H.U.D.
 


I did -the same thing turned up in Indonesia an hour later. Fact.



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