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Why is Color an issue in the Election?

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posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 07:14 PM
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As an outside observer I am regularly taken aback at how the issue of a certain candidate's color is constantly being mentioned. After all, leaving aside the small native American minority the US consists entirely of immigrant families, so surely no ethnic group has any greater claim to legitimacy than any other? Why, then, is this still an issue in the 21 Century?!

It is perfectly understandable that the idea of 'a black President' is significant insofar as it would be the ultimate proof that the racism that once haunted American society is a skeleton in the cupboard only in terms of history. But what I have found a little disconcerting is the subtle, but real impression that some people still see a candidate's color as an issue that might influence their vote.

I would be delighted if people could come on and convince me that my misgivings are largely unfounded. On the other hand if this is having an impact on how people think about their vote I would very much appreciate an explanation of why (either with respect to particular segments of the electorate or to the poster him/herself).

Is it, for instance, that there is an identifiable "black" vote, a sociologically identifiable "section of society"? If so, it strikes me as quite shocking that such divisions remain in this day and age.

How on earth could a person's color be perceived to have any impact on their ability to do a job, no matter how important?..




posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 07:21 PM
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It shouldn't be a factor, but sadly it is to some people. I have seen several news reports recently where they were interviewing voters and people of a certain race specifically said they were voting for Obama because of his skin color. I have also seen videos of people specifically saying they will not vote for him because of his skin color. For the most part, I believe racism has been stamped out here in the US. But it does still exist to an extent. It's sad but it's true. As to why someone would vote for or against someone because of their race I cannot answer that because I do not understand it either.



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 07:31 PM
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I think its only a factor to a very small minority of Americans. Most of us have grown up, and don't judge on the basis of race anymore.

The MSM mentions it at times, but only to point out how far we've come as a country...

It is an amazing feat. Obama supporter or not, you have to admit, we've come a long way in 40 years.

Bush supporter or no, you have to admit the appointment of Powell and Rice to their high positions, is nothing short of historic as well.



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 07:37 PM
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What I am hearing so far is very encouraging indeed. Perhaps American society is more unified, indeed more grown up, as nj2day put it, than I feared. If so, please forgive me for having doubts.

(I suppose one thing that has stuck in my mind is how 'color' was made into an issue in the OJ Simpson trial. I can't understand it to this day.)



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 07:45 PM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 


As a conservatarian African-American I find it amusing that when liberal African-Americans run for office and get 90% of the black vote, no one every questions whether their vote was a result of race-based voting.



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 07:52 PM
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reply to post by mabus325
 


I think it is questioned, just not out loud. To do so, while being white anyway, is to open yourself up to being labeled racist whether you really are one or not. Just as any white person who has questioned Obama or his policies has been called racist on this very board. Which is ridiculous in my opinion.



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 07:53 PM
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hmm, let's see here... why would race be an issue? hmm well i just can't imagine. i dunno let's see.

ponder ponder ponder..



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 07:56 PM
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Why is skin color/race a factor in ANYTHING anymore.

Putting aside elections....it is still a factor on forms, scholarships, groups, neighborhoods, TV networks etc etc etc.

Embracing one's heritage is a great thing (as I embrace my heritage). But to attach all of these issues to it is ridiculous.



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 08:01 PM
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if you guys are surprised by that then you need a reality check.

second line



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 08:02 PM
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Stereotypes, thats what leads to racism, or is at least a part in racism.
Come on seriously, u see a "darker" individual with the name Barak Hussain Obama what is the first thing people are going too think. Its not racism its just how the media has brainwashed people into thinking.



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 08:06 PM
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Race is still an issue because though we maybe 40-50 years removed from the start of the Civil Rights movement of the sixties, there is still a large section of people who still resent them being intermixed into their society. It is going to take two to three more generations until racism is seriously eradicated from this land. It is a shame that this is true and we are not beyond this. I have seen Racism on both sides on this election.

I was actually called a racist when I talked to an elderly black woman. She asked me if I was going to vote for Obama, and I told her no because I don't think he had the right stuff to lead our nation. Instead of asking me why I felt that she just said I am not voting for him, because he is black.

Then I had a family member just openly say that he was voting for McCain because he couldn't vote for a black person. Well he used a little stronger language, but you get the drift.

It is very annoying that people need to be belittling when it comes to these matters but it is there for us all to see.



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 08:22 PM
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I woke today really wishing that my 3 uncles were still alive. They were all card carrying members. I would have called them to ask them their opinions of this election and what the truly prejudice think.

My Mom however was very radical in her thinking according to them and she raised me to think independently, open minded and with my heart.

What I discovered was that prejudice is a two way street. I have been on both sides of the coin. There are so many people here in America that are still not willing to see a Black man become President, that I am certain of.

The extent that they will go to to keep Obama from succeeding I do not know.



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 09:08 PM
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Color isn't an issue with my vote. I made my decisions based on the issues and where the candidates stand on them. Granted, it comes down to choosing the lesser of two evils, more or less.

Racism will not die unless both black and white stop using it as an excuse for a variety of things...
Plenty of white people act a certain way towards people of color "because they are black"; likewise people of color act certain ways towards whites "because they are black".

Unfortunately it seems many people don't want to let go of the past and move into the future as a *human race*.

[edit on 3-11-2008 by md11forever]



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 09:15 PM
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Well, last week I was coming home from vacation and stopped at a gas station in Tennessee.

Inside, displayed with utter pride, were bumper stickers and t-shirts displaying the Confederate Flag with slogans like "I would have picked my own cotton if I knew this was going to happen".

In a nutshell, that is why race is an issue. Not to sound elitist, but much of America is populated by ignorant folks were don't much like those who aren't colored the same as them.



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 09:27 PM
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reply to post by mabus325
 


Mabus you hit the nail on the head, It should be equal on both sides of the fence.... And I that you for your post, you are a true conservative. I can tell you vote for the man and not the party....Me too.



[edit on 3-11-2008 by rikk7111]



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 10:50 PM
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reply to post by Mad Max
 


I'm amazed at the bias when it comes to racism.

A lot more people will be voting for Obama because he is black then will voting against him because he is black. Wouldnt you say these people are just as ignorant?

I will not be voting for Obama, and it has NOTHING to do with race.



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 11:01 PM
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Originally posted by Xodiac
reply to post by Mad Max
 


I'm amazed at the bias when it comes to racism.

A lot more people will be voting for Obama because he is black then will voting against him because he is black. Wouldnt you say these people are just as ignorant?

I will not be voting for Obama, and it has NOTHING to do with race.


I agree with you that more will vote for him because of his color. African Americans (or whatever they perfer to be called) for the most part feel that they have endured alot and it is their turn.

I can't tell you how many times I told a black person (when asked) that I am not voting for Obama and before I can finish my comment they say "its because he's black isn't it".

It is sad, but the truth often is.



posted on Nov, 4 2008 @ 12:08 AM
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Ummmm....

I'm gonna take a shot in the dark here and say "racism".

I get that the main thing here is that we as humans should be above something as petty as racism, which is obvious from all the posters here stating thier Christ-like un-biasness, but c'mon, really?

What an absolutely ridiculous question to ask.

As long as thier have been humans on this planet, there has been racism, and as long as there are, there will be racism. Hell, we're not even the only species that has racsim. It happens in wildlife as well.

Now sure, the images that some will conjure in thier head when they hear the word "racism" will be some of the most vile behavior ever seen on the planet, but that is the extreme. There are many instances that are much more subtle, even some here in this thread by posters claiming supreme civility.

When I used to live in Seattle I tried to take the bus for a while. I tried it for about two weeks until I could no longer tolerate a group of Indians that got on the bus about halfway through the trip.

See these people smelled like poo (note that I did not refer to the subjects as "they", or "those Indians", or "whatever they prefer to be called right now", that would be racist). For whatever reason, when they got on the entire bus was overwhelmed with the extremely pungent funk of curry for the remaining 1/2 hour of the trip.

It disgusted me. Maybe I don't like curry ( I do actually, w/shrimp), but I did not like these people because of thier hygiene. Does that make me a racist? No, it makes me human. Do I avoid taking deep breaths when in a closed space with Indian people? Yes, maybe racist.

Would I not vote for Obama if he smelled real bad? Only if I had to share a bus with him everyday.

The truth, is that some people don't like me, for whatever reason, and I don't like some people for whatever reason, and there is not a person on this planet that can deny the same damn thing.

Early racist joke:

Hey, did you guys hear the one about the cavemen from the Nuk-bog tribe?...

They live in a BOG! BWAAAHAHAAAHAHAAA! Stupid Nuk-bogs!!!!

Get it? A bog! They live in a bog! Not a CAVE! Get it? CAVE-men!!!!!!

Oh nevermind.



posted on Nov, 4 2008 @ 03:16 PM
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reply to post by Kaiser Sohse
 



What an absolutely ridiculous question to ask.

As long as thier have been humans on this planet, there has been racism, and as long as there are, there will be racism.

"That's just the way it is" not only belittles the issue, it suggests it is pointless to try and address it. While there are indeed some people whose attitudes are hardened, many others who have been influenced by racial prejudice, whether directly or inadvertently, are open-minded enough to reconsider their attitudes.

Here are just a coupe of cases in point:

In the UK 20+ years ago there was deep mistrust and open hostility towards ethnic minorities on a nationwide scale, at every level of society. Prolonged, concerted efforts both on the part of the government and the minority groups themselves have led to social cohesion unthinkable only a short time ago. While mistakes were made, and the situation is still far from perfect there is now a palpable sense of mutual respect that pervades our society. I, like millions of others, have undergone a personal journey that has led to recognizing my own deep-rooted, baseless prejudices and coming to appreciate that there is strength in diversity - as long as the talents of all are allowed to flourish unhindered.

Secondly, the movement in South Africa from apartheid towards equal rights has involved masses of ethnic Afrikaans questioning their own convictions regarding the role of race in SA society in a way unthinkable only two or three decades ago.

Far from being ridiculous, it is a question we should all be asking ourselves. What is more, the call for every society to root out racial prejudice should be vigorous and unrelenting until the achievements of the UK & SA (for example) are reflected in every civilized nation.

And I am taken aback that some in 'The Land of the Free' might consider ongoing harassment and oppression on the basis of skin-color something not worth confronting. It is those with that attitude that need a reality check. This is the 21 Century. Time to move on.

Reactionary cynicism is not becoming in this day and age, to say the least. I'm afraid your response is full of it. I can therefore only hope it was rhetoric rather than your considered opinion.



posted on Nov, 4 2008 @ 08:31 PM
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reply to post by pause4thought
 



"That's just the way it is" not only belittles the issue, it suggests it is pointless to try and address it. While there are indeed some people whose attitudes are hardened, many others who have been influenced by racial prejudice, whether directly or inadvertently, are open-minded enough to reconsider their attitudes.


That claim is subjective, and cannot be substantiated in any way. This leads to your next point, which is very good actually:


In the UK 20+ years ago there was deep mistrust and open hostility towards ethnic minorities on a nationwide scale, at every level of society. Prolonged, concerted efforts both on the part of the government and the minority groups themselves have led to social cohesion unthinkable only a short time ago. While mistakes were made, and the situation is still far from perfect there is now a palpable sense of mutual respect that pervades our society. I, like millions of others, have undergone a personal journey that has led to recognizing my own deep-rooted, baseless prejudices and coming to appreciate that there is strength in diversity - as long as the talents of all are allowed to flourish unhindered.


I find your use of the word "mistrust" very appropriate. While mistrust is one of the key ingredients of racism, it is also something completely different. In my world, it is not currently socially acceptable to be racist. Mistrust however, is a part of everyday life.

Allthough racial tensions have decreased in the UK, for you to state that mistrust no longer exists is ludicrous at best.

While it may not be acceptable to be openly racist in the UK any longer, many I suspect, are just toting the company line.

There is mistrust everywhere. It is part of the genetic fiber of human beings. Mistrust in business, sports, churches, hiring a babysitter, and yes, politics. This very website is rooted in mistrust.


And I am taken aback that some in 'The Land of the Free' might consider ongoing harassment and oppression on the basis of skin-color something not worth confronting. It is those with that attitude that need a reality check. This is the 21 Century. Time to move on.


I am an American, and tomorrow I will be proud to live in a Nation that has elected a man of African-American heritage as our President. Maybe then it will be those in "Her Majesty's Kingdom" that have some moving on to do. Also, as I'm sure you know, us Americans are quite proficient in our confrontational skills.


Reactionary cynicism is not becoming in this day and age, to say the least. I'm afraid your response is full of it. I can therefore only hope it was rhetoric rather than your considered opinion.


I'm gald to see that my "reactionary cynicism" has provided you the pulpit that you were so desiring when you created this thread.



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