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Electricity Found On Saturn Moon.

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posted on Oct, 30 2008 @ 07:27 PM
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Another interesting discovery found on Titian.


At a brisk -350 degrees Fahrenheit (-180 Celsius), Titan is currently much too cold to host anything close to life as we know it, scientists say.

But a new study reports faint signs of a natural electric field in Titan's thick cloud cover that are similar to the energy radiated by lightning on Earth.

Lightning is thought to have sparked the chemical reactions that led to the origin of life on our planet.

"As of now, lightning activity has not been observed in Titan's atmosphere," said lead author Juan Antonio Morente of the University of Granada in Spain.

But, he said, the signals that have been detected "are an irrefutable proof for the existence of electric activity."

news.nationalgeographic.com...

Related thread.
news.nationalgeographic.com...


I think that,instead of spending money on studying deep space,we should spend it on studying our own galaxy and our own solar system.Who knows what else can be closer to us than we realize.




posted on Oct, 30 2008 @ 09:29 PM
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An interesting find and could provide more clues as to the origins of life on our own planet.

It's just a pity Never A Straight Answer takes so damned long to do anything. At this rate we might colonise space by the end of the next millenia or two....

[edit on 30/10/2008 by Kryties]



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 04:13 AM
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reply to post by jakyll
 


I think that, instead of spending money on studying deep space,we should spend it on studying our own galaxy and our own solar system.Who knows what else can be closer to us than we realize.

That's a pretty sad comment.

Do you know why we're so interested in cosmological research, or 'studying deep space', as you put it?

It is because the cosmos is, in a sense, a gigantic physics lab. High-energy events of the type we could never reproduce on Earth occur regularly in deep space. By studying them, we learn more about the fundamental laws of physics and the structure of the universe.

There is nothing wrong with exploring our own solar system; there is much of interest in it, and much with the potential to benefit humanity.

But to call for funds to be diverted from cosmological research to exploring the solar system is to display a certain... lack of understanding.



posted on Oct, 31 2008 @ 12:05 PM
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Do you know why we're so interested in cosmological research, or 'studying deep space', as you put it?


I do.
Maybe what i shoulda said was that more money should go into studying our own galaxy while still studying deep space.



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 12:44 AM
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reply to post by jakyll
 

Yes, that would be more the thing. The trouble is, there never is enough money to do everything, so one project must starve to feed another.



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 07:08 AM
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Nice, yet another phenomena predicted by the Electric Universe theory.



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 07:23 AM
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Even if the natural electric field is active enough to form a lightning, it wouldn't be able to sparkle a life as the one on Earth, since it's much too cold on Titan.. Or maybe this is just a warning we should expect new life forms to evolve whenever the temperatures get lower there.



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 07:37 AM
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The new buzz!?!?
Scientists are Zapping piles of dirt to see if any new cells form (life) . So far... nothing....



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 07:42 AM
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Interesting OP, thanks for sharing. The below is sort of related, was going to start a thread about it but didnt think anyone would be too bothered.


[quuote]
The analysis showed that surprisingly, during the formation of the solar system, when dust and rubble in a disk around the sun collided and stuck together to form ever-larger rocks and eventually the planets we know today, even objects much smaller than planets — just 160 kilometers across or so — were large enough to melt almost completely.

This total melting of the planet-forming chunks of rock, called planetesimals, caused their constituents to separate out, with lighter materials including silicates floating to the surface and eventually forming a crust, while heavier iron-rich material sank down to the core, where it began swirling around to produce a magnetic dynamo. The researchers were able to study traces of the magnetic fields produced by that dynamo, now recorded in the meteorites that fell to Earth.

"The magnetism in meteorites has been a longstanding mystery," Weiss said, and the realization that such small bodies could have melted and formed magnetic dynamos is a major step toward solving that riddle.
Source


Im not sure what size a body would need to be in order to produce a magnetic dynamo, but interesting to know nonetheless



posted on Nov, 3 2008 @ 08:10 AM
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reply to post by LetsPlayFeedTheGater
 

Yes, scientists keep on looking around, but I'm sure most of them are aware that other life forms are not necessarily visible to our eyes and technologies. So they may never see possible life forms on Titan. Or elsewhere. So do we, unfortunately, or fortunately.



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