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Freemasonry and the Supreme Being

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posted on Sep, 2 2008 @ 11:52 PM
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Sorry guys, I wanted to make more replies, but those last few posts really took a lot out of me. I think I'm just about done for the night. I shall return, proceed.




posted on Sep, 3 2008 @ 07:58 AM
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reply to post by jackinthebox
 


Check the wikipedia article on Deism and see if any of it fits.



posted on Sep, 4 2008 @ 10:28 AM
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Its easy, you have to declare your faith so you can commit blaspheme in the name of the craft... A Mortal sins no comming back baby


[edit on 4-9-2008 by urza2k4]



posted on Sep, 4 2008 @ 10:51 AM
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Consider this.

As far back as we can tell, it has been a tenet of Freemasonry that so long as one believed in a Supreme Being, no one in a Lodge would ask more. The doctrine of religious toleration in Lodges predates such a concept in any nation state in Europe, certainly, and possibly in the world.

Think what it might mean in a society, like England, which had just switched "official" faiths twice with resulting loss of life, property, and status on both sides, to have a place where men of differing views could come together in security, trusting in the best in one another, and setting aside their differences in their common desire to be better men. Think of what a radical notion this was at that time.

Now, realize that to some, this remains a radical notion. The very question of the OP about Freemasonry accepting someone who has faith in a evil Supreme Being is highly suggestive. For some, any god who does not conform in every particular to my understanding of my God is a false god and, thus, a demon in disguise.

If you think I'm exaggerating, check out some of the Anti-Masonic sites on the web.

The notion of religious tolerance was, in its day, both revolutionary and entirely unique. Freemasonry has a long history of insisting on this tolerance. When the Grand Lodge of Prussia attempted to exclude Jews from membership, it was promptly declared "irregular" by the rest of the Masonic world --- and in short order came to regret its bigotry and repeal its innovation.




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