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Why are we so quick to get vaccinations to 3rd world countries and not food ?

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posted on Aug, 24 2008 @ 02:12 PM
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Please explain this to me...?
WIth vaccinations immuity is not gauranteed.
Even if you become immunue it a possiblilty immunity NOT will last.
Vaccination contain flouride mercury and all the other bad chemicals.
Theres is NO safe level of mercury or flouride and flourides in rat poison. So I'm not surprised alot of parents are getting exemtions but,they talk about HERD IMMUNIZATION. When a certain group of people who don't get vaccination put the ones who are in danger...?
I was like if theres vaccinated then why do then need to worry about hte ones who choose not to get vaccinated shouldn't they be immunue ? Even if everybody was vaccinated theres still a good risk of infection. RESEARCH THIS STUFF YOURSELF before anwsering. I just think the risks out weight the benefit. Also even if everybody is vaccinated your basically using your children as test subjects. Considering the fact even though the FDA approved it it probaly only been tested on animals and they started on humans as in your child.
I mean is our immunue system that unreliable ?
Wouldn't just getting good proper nutirtion and vitamins and minerals be enough ?


I'm not saying we don't provide food aid I'm just saying look at the condition of the world and how many kids go starving and how fat we are are we really giving any REAL help at all ?
They have television ads on TV stating buy diapers and you supply a innocent child with a vaccination I was like WTF HOW BOUT SOME FOOD WITH SOME VITAMINS AND MINERALS!!!!???



[edit on 24-8-2008 by Ggurl777]




posted on Aug, 24 2008 @ 02:16 PM
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Personally, I think a lot of vaccines are useless.
But, anti-parasitic medicines are more important than foods, sometimes, because of the malnutrition that comes from them.



posted on Aug, 24 2008 @ 04:28 PM
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reply to post by Clearskies
 


Anti parasite medicines would still provide far more immediate short term value than vaccines. That, and clean, easily accessible water



posted on Aug, 25 2008 @ 02:16 AM
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Food and water are much heavier, bulkier, and prone to spoilage. That, and disease kills quite a bit more than starvation does. Vaccination is proven extremely effective, though never 100%. There's no other defense against many viral infections aside from good hygiene and sterile food and water. The latter three are very hard to come by in emergency situations, though.

Only recently have portable filters suitable for emergency situations been developed. Even then, they're typically activated carbon models with rather large pore sizes, which will still leave users susceptible to water-borne viruses. Bringing huge quantities of fresh water is simply out of the question most of the time. Remember: it weighs a metric ton per cubic meter.

food is usually a secondary concern in such situations. People can last a fair amount of time without food, so it's usually not the first priority. It's important to get people immune to common diseases early, because disasters usually leave places as breeding grounds for all kinds of nasty diseases, what with dead bodies all over and such.


Herd immunity is very important. There will always be individuals who, for various medical reasons, cannot be vaccinated. And a few who, for other reasons, won't be. As long as their numbers are few enough, they stand a very low chance of getting the disease, by simple virtue of never running into anyone who has it. The medically unvaccinatable is usually the very young, and people with other medical issues. The medical community generally urges those who have no medically significant reason to not be vaccinated to get vaccinated for these people's protection.

Vaccines range greatly in effectiveness, generally from about 85% effective up to over 99%. In some live attenuated vaccines, people stand a small risk of catching the actual disease, or a weakened form, from the vaccine itself. Live attenuated vaccines are pretty rare, but are generally quite effective.

I'd certainly recommend it for all childhood illnesses. most causes of infant mortality are easily prevented by such measures.

Generally it's worth it, for most diseases. The flu is kind of iffy. I suspect many employers require it simply to keep from having to issue sick days. I was rather annoyed that my employer had all new hires vaccinated for the flu right on site. They just lined us all up for the needles. I'm sure I probably signed something for it at some point, but I certainly didn't remember.

I really have to doubt any sinister purpose in this case, though; they just have me working in a warehouse, delivering food. Ain't some tracking chip, or they'd know how much I slack off.



posted on Aug, 25 2008 @ 03:49 AM
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Originally posted by mdiinican
Food and water are much heavier, bulkier, and prone to spoilage. That, and disease kills quite a bit more than starvation does. Vaccination is proven extremely effective, though never 100%. There's no other defense against many viral infections aside from good hygiene and sterile food and water. The latter three are very hard to come by in emergency situations, though.

Only recently have portable filters suitable for emergency situations been developed. Even then, they're typically activated carbon models with rather large pore sizes, which will still leave users susceptible to water-borne viruses. Bringing huge quantities of fresh water is simply out of the question most of the time. Remember: it weighs a metric ton per cubic meter.

food is usually a secondary concern in such situations. People can last a fair amount of time without food, so it's usually not the first priority. It's important to get people immune to common diseases early, because disasters usually leave places as breeding grounds for all kinds of nasty diseases, what with dead bodies all over and such.


Herd immunity is very important. There will always be individuals who, for various medical reasons, cannot be vaccinated. And a few who, for other reasons, won't be. As long as their numbers are few enough, they stand a very low chance of getting the disease, by simple virtue of never running into anyone who has it. The medically unvaccinatable is usually the very young, and people with other medical issues. The medical community generally urges those who have no medically significant reason to not be vaccinated to get vaccinated for these people's protection.

Vaccines range greatly in effectiveness, generally from about 85% effective up to over 99%. In some live attenuated vaccines, people stand a small risk of catching the actual disease, or a weakened form, from the vaccine itself. Live attenuated vaccines are pretty rare, but are generally quite effective.

I'd certainly recommend it for all childhood illnesses. most causes of infant mortality are easily prevented by such measures.

Generally it's worth it, for most diseases. The flu is kind of iffy. I suspect many employers require it simply to keep from having to issue sick days. I was rather annoyed that my employer had all new hires vaccinated for the flu right on site. They just lined us all up for the needles. I'm sure I probably signed something for it at some point, but I certainly didn't remember.

I really have to doubt any sinister purpose in this case, though; they just have me working in a warehouse, delivering food. Ain't some tracking chip, or they'd know how much I slack off.

Okay ask people in power if they take their shots and you get every shots know to man and see how you feel.
Also i don't understand herd immunity if people are already vaccinated shouldn't that protect them from the disease!??
I mean you get the vaccination to PROTECT YOU FROM THE Disease and if it can't do that then whats the point of getting the vaccine ?

[edit on 25-8-2008 by Ggurl777]



posted on Aug, 25 2008 @ 04:10 AM
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Here is the honest and cold truth...We don't want their dead bodies spreading disease and sickness to "us".


assuming your "we" and my "we" are the same people.



posted on Aug, 25 2008 @ 02:41 PM
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When "they" illegally jump our border fences or come over on a boat illegally, or just make it "here" some how, "we" don't want "them" infecting "us".



posted on Aug, 25 2008 @ 02:51 PM
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Originally posted by Stockburn
When "they" illegally jump our border fences or come over on a boat illegally, or just make it "here" some how, "we" don't want "them" infecting "us".





OP's point is: how can they infect "us", if "we" are already immune, because we did get vaccinated?

The only thing I can think of is that a virus could mutate if it would spread to a population of non-vaccinated people, and turn into a virus that could also infect the vaccinated people.



posted on Aug, 25 2008 @ 02:59 PM
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reply to post by enigmania
 


Very simple. There are many people even in the US not vaccinating their children. Simply because they think the risk is to great. I.e., Vaccines can lead to autism etc.

The simple fact remains our little infants would be the most at risk when someone did come over who was a carrier, or child where his or her parents were to ignorant or poor to get vavccines for their children.

Look at smallpox. Many hundred of thousands were killed every year a few hundred years ago by this. I don't even think it was eradicated until the 70s. Heck maybe its still around in some foresaken places. Ugh!



posted on Aug, 25 2008 @ 03:04 PM
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People will accept the vaccines. And if we give them too much food, it might have a negative impact on their local economy.

Additionally, a lot of times food and starvation is used by power players within smaller countries as a political tool, so food aid is often either refused or blocked. Starvation is all about politics, not about there being too little food or people not willing to give it to the hungry.



posted on Aug, 25 2008 @ 09:02 PM
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reply to post by Ggurl777
 


Herd immunity is to protect the people who AREN'T vaccinated, not to protect those who are. The vaccines are there for that, and are generally pretty effective. Herd immunity protects babies, those who for other medical reasons can't get vaccinated, and those who for personal reasons won't be. If vaccine uptake is too low, however, herd immunity is ineffective.

Vaccines are almost all very effective for the prevention of the disease they're supposed to prevent; it may be anecdotal, but I've never caught any disease I'm inoculated for. I haven't gotten the flu on a year that I've been vaccinated by my employer, and I've gotten it every year I haven't been.

I take all required inoculations in the time frame recommended by my health care provider, and am pretty damn healthy; mentally and physically. The key to health is diet and exercise. vaccines don't enter into it, except to prevent illnesses, which is admittedly handy. perhaps a few people have adverse reactions to certain preservatives; I've never met anyone who has.

Except to avoid inconvenience, I wouldn't recommend taking any vaccines that aren't for diseases that cause preventable deaths in infants and those with compromised immune systems.







 
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