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Chi-com's stealing Olympic gold?

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posted on Aug, 15 2008 @ 10:43 PM
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i doubt that will happen. I don't like the fact that a lot of the athletes families have not been able to see there own sons and daughters compete because the seats have been given to the chinese officials. Or the fact that they said the place would be filled to the brim with spectators and you watch events such as the swimming and there is nobody even there. I think this years Olympics is not as great as they make it out to be. Sure they spent the money but the whole olympic spirit is dead from the inside.




posted on Aug, 17 2008 @ 05:22 PM
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www.huffingtonpost.com...

What began as whispers among the media and gymnastics insiders weeks ago about the ages of three of China's female Olympic gymnasts -- Jiang Yuyuan, Yang Yilin and He Kexin -- has grown into ear-shattering, head-hurting shouts. Despite assurances by Chinese officials that all three are 16, the minimum age of eligibility for Olympic competition, newly discovered documents and records prove otherwise.

China has a rich history of age falsification in Olympics competition, especially in gymnastics. At the 2000 Sydney Olympics, three years after the minimum age was raised to 16 in gymnastics, Chinese gymnast Yang Yun competed and won a bronze medal in the uneven bars (coincidentally this event is also He's specialty). Yang's passport said she was born on December 24, 1984 and turning 16 in the year of the Games, making her eligible. She later confessed in a television interview that she was only 14 at the time of the competition and that she and her coaches had lied about her age.


More of the same, Chi-com's cheat, now as in the past. I though some of you would like to see what China did in the past.

Roper



posted on Aug, 17 2008 @ 05:40 PM
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“One of the girls has a missing tooth,” Karolyi said, suggesting that the gymnast was so young that she lost a baby tooth and had yet to have a permanent one emerge.

www.nytimes.com...

Claims of questionable officiating and even cheating flared Wednesday with the Olympic gymnastics, shooting and boxing competitions coming under fire.

Australian veteran shooter Russell Mark alleged that Chinese judges, influenced by a boisterous home crowd, helped local hope Hu Binyuan win the Double Trap bronze medal.

Mark, 44, the Atlanta Games gold medalist who finished fifth in the event here, told Australian media those local judges had awarded a hit to Hu even though he missed the target.

"One of them clearly he missed," Mark was quoted as saying. "I don't think anyone out there thought he hit it. If that had been for a gold medal, I would have been protesting."

www.americanthinker.com...

gatewaypundit.blogspot.com...

If a Nation cheats in a silly game, what will they do in world events?

Roper



posted on Aug, 17 2008 @ 05:52 PM
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Wonder how many teams are going to complain about being beaten by a 13 year old?



posted on Aug, 17 2008 @ 06:23 PM
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reply to post by CO Vet
 


Plenty should.
Gymnastics is not a sport of giants or of bulk muscle. It's a sport where the best of the best are the tiniest, lightest, and most flexible. Take a look at the height/weight of the top female gymnasts past and present; Mary Lou Retton is listed at 4'9.5", Shannon Miller at 5'1", Shawn Johnson is 4'8". All are well under 100lbs, or were below that weight when they were actively competing.

Take a 16 year old who has gone through or mostly gone through puberty and compare her build to a 12 year old who hasn't started putting on the fat deposits, height gains, and weight gains that come with puberty. Who's going to be more lithe? Who will have less weight to maneuver through a twisting double back? Who will have tinier feet to work their way across a 4" wide balance beam?

It's a huge advantage to be pre- or barely- pubescent in female gymnastics. That's why you almost never see anyone over 20 or 21 competing in gymnastics on an Olympic level; by that age, their bodies have changed too much to allow them to be the world's elite.



posted on Aug, 19 2008 @ 04:14 PM
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sports.yahoo.com...,101537

And today, 12-year old 16-year old Chinese gymnast He Kexin won gold over Nastia Liukin based on an obscure tiebreaking rule. The two received the same score from the judges, but He won a tiebreak because an Australian judge apparently was watching a different competition.

Every judging break seems to have gone China's way during these Olympics. I'm not suggesting a conspiracy, I just think that judges are humans who are influenced by big names, fans and other external factors. Oh, and they're also terrible. Judged events will always be viewed with skepticism by those who lose for this reason, particularly those who lose to a member of the home delegation. (Think Roy Jones Jr. at the 1988 Seoul Olympics.)

Ya' know we do need to consider the Chinese judges, I mean after all if they don't rule in favor of Chinese contestants, it's " off with their heads" or maybe a slave factory.

Roper



posted on Aug, 21 2008 @ 04:44 PM
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Maybe now someone will do something about the cheating.

Read on.

Roper


www.timesonline.co.uk...

The International Olympic Committee has ordered an investigation into mounting allegations that Chinese authorities covered up the true age of their gold-medal winning gymnastics star because she was too young to compete.



posted on Aug, 23 2008 @ 12:25 PM
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Alright, here's more. Interesting!

A US computer expert told The Times on Thursday that he had uncovered Chinese government documents proving that He and Yang were only 14. Both appeared to have been registered as two years younger in previous years.

The online documents were the latest pieces of evidence to have emerged in recent months suggesting that the two athletes were two years beneath the minimum age of 16, in a sport where younger gymnasts are thought to have an advantage, being more flexible and thus better able to perform more difficult routines.

Roper



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