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what is your favorite survival tip?

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posted on Jun, 23 2008 @ 11:01 PM
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what is your favorite tidbit of information? that is not run of the mill?

I think it is good to have little handy bits of info, just in case.

Like, dandelion roots are rich in vitamin C, and many other nutrients (don't want to get scurvy)

You can find the north star by taking the bottom two stars of the big dipper, draw a line to the handle of the little dipper, and the bright star at the end of the little dipper is the North Star.
(lets hope you have clear skies if lost)




posted on Jun, 23 2008 @ 11:19 PM
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Stay calm. Start mentally preparing to do without. Besides not to long ago in the news they said the less you eat the longer you live. Your assentially a poop machine. If you make to much you'll wear out
. I live in the Boreal forest on a lake. You can often buy remote rural property cheap. It's just that most people will find it very hard to make the transition. All my stuff is paid for so I don't have to make alot of cash. That might mean doing a job that is'nt quite as impressive as you do now but hey, If your serious about this it should'nt bother you. I have two wood stoves 3 chain saws and a 24" Buzz saw. fishing hunting and trapping gear. We check second hand stores and buy nice cloths when there availible and store them away. I'll add more as I think about it.



posted on Jun, 23 2008 @ 11:25 PM
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mine isn't a big deal, but it was the best survival tip as far as food goes for someone who is a single mom, can't afford to eat much as it is, and has no land in which to grow my own food on.

some guy told me to stock up on raman noodles bc they are very cheap. they aren't nutritional (obviously), they SUCK taste wise (at least in my opinion), but they are cheap and for when/if things get that bad, eating a little something is preferable than eating dirt or air.



posted on Jun, 23 2008 @ 11:25 PM
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I guess your talking about short term not economic collapse ? Pine needles are very high in vitamin C the tubers in bull rushes are edible. When eating water plants remember if you would,nt drink the water the plant will likley not be good either.



posted on Jun, 23 2008 @ 11:28 PM
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I would suggest that we follow the Presidents lead and acquire some property that could keep us out of harms way and go there.

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 23 2008 @ 11:32 PM
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I have two favorites:

One from my dad: When the SHTF, sit your young butt down, and think. Then think again. Where are you? What have you got with you? Think, think, think.

My grandad: If you're cold, put on a hat. Remember, heat rises.

[edit on 6/23/2008 by seagull]



posted on Jun, 26 2008 @ 08:45 AM
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From a non-survivalist's point of view:

Keep a decent stockpile of chocolate!

It is 5 times more calorific than rice kilo for kilo, and takes up very little space, requires no cooking or prep, ideal for if you're on the move. It contains loads of fat and sugar for energy, and whats more it can lift your mood, which is crucial to survival.

[edit on 26-6-2008 by Paul]



posted on Jun, 26 2008 @ 08:59 AM
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Shelter, water and fire.


If you got those three, every thing else can wait till the morning.



posted on Jun, 26 2008 @ 09:01 AM
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Mine is

"Don't be there when the SHTF"

then failing that, I guess second best must be

"It is not the strongest of species who survive, nor the most intelligent, but the ones most responsive to change."



posted on Jun, 26 2008 @ 09:14 AM
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Communications.

As has been pointed out, planning your actions relative to your situation (sit and think) is key. But you cannot plan if you don't know what's going on around you (gathering intelligence). What route should/can you take to your likeside survival retreat? How will you know whether leaving your current situation and 'bugging-out' will better your survival chances or lessen them without the ability to collect intelligence via communications? I read countless posts of people with discussions of buying motorcycles and ATV's that will get them to their wilderness stronghold. Says who? How do you know you won't end up riding through a controlled area? Bogged down in massive exoduses of people? Natural obstacles? Communications. Get what you need now and learn how to use it.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 10:20 AM
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You guys have a lot of great ideas.

I didn't know that about pine needles.

Does it matter which pine?

I have thought about stocking up on chocolate, but it doesn't stand a chance in my house.



And I think the raman noodles are a good idea too. I don't think they go bad. I know people who have made salads out of them.
And I personally think they are good. And you get your sodium *grins.*


The PP is right, it is about change, accepting change. I wouldn't sit there and hope and pray that civilization is gonna come back. I would start taking action.

Thank you for your replies. Keep them coming if you wish...good info out there.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 12:10 PM
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My tip is this...

Go for long night walks

Even if you think you know your local area like the back of your hand during the day, once night falls and most of the world is asleep, your environment takes on a whole new life.

If you can, try and get comfortable with doing this in both urban and rural settings

Walk slowly and be as silent on your feet as you can and familiarise yourself with the nocturnal sounds of your surroundings. The more regularly you practice, the less intimidating night-navigation will feel, the calmer your imagination and fight/flight responses will be at a sudden sound/movement in the dark, and the more your eyesight/hearing will sharpen



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 12:44 PM
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When in the sticks always wear a ''personal survival kit''.

This should ideally be on your waist belt. This should carry a knife, water bottle and ideally a pouch. This pouch should contain a ''baccy size tin'' survival kit. If there is room, then you could add a heximine stove and maybe a ''space blanket''.

There may be times when you are separated from your rucksack and all its goodies. But at least the ''essentials'' will always be ''attached'' to you.

Personally, I normally carry two knives - the 'big bugger' on my belt kit and a small swiss army style knife in my top pocket attached to a lanyard.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 01:08 PM
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Originally posted by nixie_nox

Does it matter which pine?


Get the young tips and make some tea.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 01:17 PM
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Manzanita berries
Fishing
Pine nuts
Grasshoppers
Ants
Grubs


...just a few off the top of my head.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 01:26 PM
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Canned food lasts for years if you're got somewhere to store it. Also, the tinned food can be anything from beans, meat, rice, veg, fruit whatever.

Just make sure you keep it dry, shake tins, no dents in cans etc., rust on the can or a dent and it won't last.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 01:26 PM
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reply to post by nixie_nox
 
DO NOT eat the pine needles without boiling them, they contain an acid that will dehydrate you rapidly. That is why most plants can't grow below them.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 01:29 PM
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reply to post by Marsrising
 
But if you have to move quickly canned foods are to heavy. Use them only if you have a safe, secluded spot where you can store them.



posted on Jun, 27 2008 @ 02:31 PM
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Providing the air is not totally contaminated, my hint is to capture a bit of water through condensation. You need some plastic, like a single ply of an untreated for bugs garbage bag maybe. Also a can or some clean container to capture the drops.
Next you dig a hole a little bigger circumference than the can and about 5 inches deeper than the height of the can.
Now suspend the plastic over the hole with the can beneath. Poke a small hole in the plastic centered over the can. Secure the plastic with a few stones so it doesn't collapse into the can. Moisture will condense overnight and drop into the can. Yes its not enough to do much with but it's a fun experiment to try anyway.



posted on Jun, 29 2008 @ 12:52 PM
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Originally posted by Tomorrow
Providing the air is not totally contaminated, my hint is to capture a bit of water through condensation. You need some plastic, like a single ply of an untreated for bugs garbage bag maybe. Also a can or some clean container to capture the drops.
Next you dig a hole a little bigger circumference than the can and about 5 inches deeper than the height of the can.
Now suspend the plastic over the hole with the can beneath. Poke a small hole in the plastic centered over the can. Secure the plastic with a few stones so it doesn't collapse into the can. Moisture will condense overnight and drop into the can. Yes its not enough to do much with but it's a fun experiment to try anyway.

You want the hole about 3 feet deep and wide. It'll collect more water. And don't poke a hole in the plastic, the condensation builds up on the underside of it and if you puncture it you'll get contaminates in the water.




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