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Question on Black Holes.

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posted on Mar, 2 2004 @ 04:39 PM
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I have an, at least what I think is, interesting question on black holes. Eventually, if I'm wrong please tell me so and I'll edit this, all stars turn into a Black Hole? They all follow the same progression line, all leading up to a Black Hole. Which is the most realistic version of a Point of No Return.

So, if every star follows the path line, which I think is true I'm totally absent minded at this point, then all stars in every Galaxy will turn into a Black Hole. So eventually, won't all Galaxy's contain more then one Black Hole? In this case, several of these since the width of some Galaxy's are enormous and would be in a distance enough to hold these. My question is, what happens then? What does a Black Hole do when it eats a lesser Black Hole? And, won't all galaxy's eventually turn into nothing but black holes orbitiing each other, flying through space slowly eating one another?




posted on Mar, 2 2004 @ 04:42 PM
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no, actually a star has to be of sufficient mass to turn into a black hole. im pretty sure its something along the lines of three times our sun's size.



posted on Mar, 2 2004 @ 04:44 PM
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you've pretty much nailed it down other than the fact that not all stars turn into black holes....only ones that are a certain mass or greater...i cant remember exactly wat this mass was...something like 7 times themass of the sun...i could be wrong though.



posted on Mar, 2 2004 @ 04:47 PM
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Ahh okay then, I didn't know what the guidelines was for a black hole where. I thought they all grew to that size, didn't know that had to have a certain amount of mass to hit that state.



posted on Mar, 2 2004 @ 04:48 PM
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I had the same question. Take the time to read my thread and add to it.

The Big Bang Cycle?

It's fairly long but I believe you will enjoy it.



posted on Mar, 2 2004 @ 04:51 PM
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Okay, thanks. I did a search on it but I didn't open that thread because I thought it was something unrelated and just got into the search engine. My apologies on that.



posted on Mar, 2 2004 @ 04:55 PM
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Originally posted by RabidGoose
Okay, thanks. I did a search on it but I didn't open that thread because I thought it was something unrelated and just got into the search engine. My apologies on that.


No, please don't be sorry. I just thought I would suggest that thread because it seems we are thinking along the same lines, and you may be able to get something from it. I was in no way showing contempt.



posted on Mar, 2 2004 @ 04:56 PM
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another point, after the mass issue,
i think BH can only generate at a Galaxy Center.

potential BH are known as Quasars and even they have est masses of like a 1/2 million suns.

what may eventually happen is each Galaxy will
generate new & evolving stars...ata rate greater than
the BH eating them up. in some distant future, as All Galaxies speed away from each other, the Galaxy
itself will grow to become its own universe sized object

space.com has too many ....



posted on Mar, 2 2004 @ 08:24 PM
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Originally posted by riffraffalunas
another point, after the mass issue,
i think BH can only generate at a Galaxy Center.


They can form anywhere, the ones toward the center often merge and grow in size and become the most massive object in the galaxy thus being at the center.



posted on Mar, 3 2004 @ 12:49 AM
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I got my own questions about them.
What do their "traces" look like?
Could we see one if it were gobbling up a neiboring star?
Does anybody really know?



posted on Mar, 3 2004 @ 12:55 AM
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We can 'see' black holes mainly in two ways. We can look for a star orbiting a very dense but invisible object. A few candidates for a black hole have been found this way.

Black holes accelerate the matter than falls into them so much, that the matter sends out a lot of light. This light can be spotted. If it were absorbing a neighbouring star, the matter pulled into the black hole will probably emit light. It is possible that we can spot this.



posted on Mar, 3 2004 @ 01:05 AM
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And since these massive blackholes are thought to be at the center of every galaxy, the blackholes are what cause the galaxies to rotate.
Also, there is rekindled debate as to whether blackholes really exist or not, they might actually be something physicists have titled: "Gravastars."

Here is a link:
joshua.zutnet.org:8000...

[Edited on 3-3-2004 by EmbryonicEssence]



posted on Mar, 3 2004 @ 02:01 AM
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Wow EmbryonicEssence, great article. I've never even heard anything about a gravastar. That could make since on why it's so hard to see a Black Hole in the center of a galaxy actually feeding. Also, the reason why the Black Hole caught feeding is suppost to be so much more massive then ours, maybe it's a true one and ours is just this, a gravastar? It's out there but hey, it is ATS after all.



posted on Mar, 3 2004 @ 03:30 AM
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it dies but its still there too so if anything passes it SUCK slerp bling splat its gone into it.

We have a super massive black hole just outside our Milkeyway galaxy its dead too.

Blackholes are thought to help in delevoping some galaxies form our milkey ways thought to have had help from the dead black hole.



posted on Mar, 3 2004 @ 03:48 AM
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here's a cut and paste of a little thread I made not too long ago that may answer a few questions and more on your curiosity. and it's written in a manner that most will understand without too much difficulty.

www.abovetopsecret.com...

The Black Hole in laymans terms


from: chandra.harvard.edu...

What you see up there isn't the black hole or the singularity itself (I'll get to that in a second). Instead, you see a graphical interpretation of the cosmic rays coming from the center of the Galaxy. Why is this important?

A Black hole is impervious to light except when it absorbs it. It can be likened to a whirlpool in the dark. You don't see it there, but you can feel it pulling and spinning you around its vortex. In space, the same ideas apply. Astronomers identify black holes by spotting areas of distorted light from stars. They see a light flash brightly or become dimmer suddenly, and based on calculations, they can predict the passage of a black hole within that star system.

A black hole is made up of three parts, mainly. At the edge, is the event horizon, which is the accumulation of the newest particles that have been swallowed by the black hole by entering the field of influence that begins at this point. This is the part that visually gives away the presence of the black hole, as it is the only part where the particles of light, photons, are still within the spectrum of colors. Like a tornado, you don't see it there until it accumulates debris such as cattle or houses. Which is how it gets that murky color.

The inner part, the actual vortex, is the implosion of gravity and can be likened to the innermost swirls of a whirlpool. It's generally thought that space/time consists of curvatures around massive objects that generate powerful gravtiational fields. It looks like this:


As you can see, the heavier (and the more mass within) the body, the bigger the curvature. This is really a representation of gravity, which has yet to be fully understood. At this point of the black hole, the particles being absorbed are on its way to the heart of the black hole; the singularity.

The final and quintissential part of a black hole is the central singularity. A singularity, theoretically, is a single point in space where all that is consumed by the black hole becomes unified as one object. This is made possible because of the massive forces that generates the pulling effect, as well as the ultra-heavy bending of localized space. Imagine a curve like the picture above, but at least 10x deeper with a cone-like depression at the center.

What this means is quite elusive to the scientific community. The significance of a singularity leads to many different possibilities, including a link to forming protomatter or perhaps even a form of afterlife as eventually, all particles will reach the supermassive black hole sitting at the center of our Milky Way Galaxy.

Black holes form, usually, when a neutron star (that's a star that collapsed on itself under its own gravitational forces) becomes so densely packed and heavy, that they implode within themselves even further... think of how when you suck in your gut, your chest tends to inflate as a result of all that air and mass being transferred from your belly. If you were a neutron star doing this, you don't have a chest for that mass to go, so your belly continues diminishing in size until *poof* it becomes a hole in your body. The force you exerted to suck in your stomach had become so great, that it sucked in the stomach itself and everything around it.

Thats all I have to say about that.



posted on Mar, 3 2004 @ 03:59 AM
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Gravastars is a fit name, as gravi for high gravity and it is still generally a star, even though its theorise to be a singularity. I forgot the amount of mass it has to have bt its something like 0 - 40 solar masses makes a neutron star or dwarf star and 40 -120 masses makes a black hole? and 120-240 masses is a supanova and 240+ is a black hole again. yea.. i forgot the source and my memery is very vague about it but i think i got it kinda right.



posted on Mar, 4 2004 @ 06:15 PM
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Stephen Hawking's website has some article(s) about black holes too. As far as I've understood it (and I don't claim to have understood all of it!), his public lectures seem to present the current scientific consensus in a reasonable manner.

www.hawking.org.uk...



posted on Mar, 8 2004 @ 09:30 AM
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Originally posted by jrod
I got my own questions about them.
What do their "traces" look like?
Could we see one if it were gobbling up a neiboring star?
Does anybody really know?


No tracers... Look at blackbody radiation in the Quantum Physics text In Search of Schordingers Cat It'll Answer all of your questions



posted on Mar, 8 2004 @ 10:04 AM
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Originally posted by amantine
We can 'see' black holes mainly in two ways. We can look for a star orbiting a very dense but invisible object. A few candidates for a black hole have been found this way.

Black holes accelerate the matter than falls into them so much, that the matter sends out a lot of light. This light can be spotted. If it were absorbing a neighbouring star, the matter pulled into the black hole will probably emit light. It is possible that we can spot this.


Also, in the X-Ray spectrum I belive, you can see the energy shooting out of the black hole also. I have also seen (on TV) a star getting sucked into a black hole, it pulles the gasses off and makes sort of a spiral pattern when it is devowering the star. Also when there is enough matter getting sucked into the blackhole at one time, it can form a sort of laser, I think they are called masers.? Cause all the matter gets lined up and pressed in one direction,



posted on Mar, 8 2004 @ 10:14 AM
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I have always wondered why they say "Nothing can escape a Black Hole", when in reality, there are lots of things escaping a Black Hole. Energy waves, radio waves, x-rays....etc. If such an object had the power to pull in everything, why can these forms of energy escape? Does this negate the Unified Field theory?



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