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Gov't wants into your laptop

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posted on May, 27 2008 @ 11:41 PM
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Gov't wants into your laptop


www.canada.com

OTTAWA -- The federal government is secretly negotiating an agreement to revamp international copyright laws that could make the information on iPods, laptops and other devices illegal, according to a leaked government document.

The deal could also force Internet service providers to hand over customer information without a court order.

Federal trade agreements do not require parliamentary approval.

Border guards and other public security personnel could become copyright police under the deal
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on May, 27 2008 @ 11:41 PM
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I am one for everyones right to privacy. Now it looks like the Canadian government is trying to give law enforcement the right to search your laptops for illegal content. Ok, sure piracy is a big problem but this is going way to far.

I buy my CD's because I like the inserts but I do put my music onto my laptop for something to listen to while I am at work that way I don't have to carry around 100 or so CD's. I don't share my music, but how will they be able to tell it hasn't been downloaded?
How many more rights to privacy are they going to take away? this is probably only the beginning.


www.canada.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on May, 27 2008 @ 11:47 PM
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Current copyright laws in Canada state that it is legal to make copies of CDs and DVDs; no one expects you to buy one CD for your car and another copy for home and maybe a third for work. As long as you do not share them. Still, the supreme court stated last year that it is legal (in Canada) to download music, films, etc. from the net, but illegal to upload to the net.

They would first have to change that bit of legislation and that would have to go through parliament.



posted on May, 27 2008 @ 11:56 PM
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It's not the governments..it's the corporate lobbyists.

Let's not forget that this world today is based in money...and where a quick dollar can be made, other people's rights will be infringed upon in light of yours...that's the corporate dollar at play.



posted on May, 27 2008 @ 11:59 PM
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The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement would see Canada join the U.S. and the European Union in a coalition against copyright infringement.Federal trade agreements do not require parliamentary approval.


Source


Looks like they don't need any political approval.



posted on May, 28 2008 @ 12:03 AM
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Federal trade agreements do not require parliamentary approval.


You mean, perhaps...the SPP?

geo.international.gc.ca...

And I was wondering why people had an issue with this...


Good catch QB...



posted on May, 28 2008 @ 12:09 AM
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I can only imagine the arrests being made because of people refusing to show their info. Looks like any they are saying that almost any security authority will have the right. I'm curious what will happen when I tell them no because it is a work laptop with company info on it that is not available to the general public. Huge impact on trade secrets and corporate espionage.



posted on May, 28 2008 @ 12:10 AM
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Scary how they are going about it all in secret and without the need of parliamentary support. The Supreme Court already ruled file sharing was not illegal. I wonder how that will play into it.

Damn it, maybe this will spur a vote of non-confidence to oust that Harper.



posted on May, 28 2008 @ 12:12 AM
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reply to post by QBSneak000
 


College security guards are going to have their hands full checking laptops all day long. I just don't see the practicality.



posted on May, 28 2008 @ 12:19 AM
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reply to post by TheComte
 



I just don't see the practicality.


Look at the bigger picture. It's not about the practicality of the law's use as stated. It's about the practicality of giving law-enforcement yet another tool to arbitrarily invade your privacy. For whatever reason the officer happens to want to look into it, legitimate or not. They could say they want to see your computer to look for pirated downloads, when in reality they're hoping you have naked pictures of your pretty wife. Or they are looking from some inside information on your latest business venture.

It really has nothing to do with copyright infringement at all.


[edit on 5/28/0808 by jackinthebox]



posted on May, 28 2008 @ 12:31 AM
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www.abovetopsecret.com...

already one topic here

i am truely bored to point it out



posted on May, 28 2008 @ 12:57 AM
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Damn, that never came up when I did the search. And just when I thought I finally beat somebody to the punch.



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