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Hebrew Wilderness Tabernacle 6th Cen BCE site located amid the US in NM

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posted on Mar, 19 2008 @ 10:22 AM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


Well... I wouldn't call it "well-intentioned" - the intention is clearly to screw up history in favor of some agenda. This is what I consider a Bad Thing™

Now if they had written it in English, and used it as the backdrop of some sort of wilderness church retreat... Eh. What the heck, go for it.




posted on Mar, 19 2008 @ 11:15 AM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


Byrd;
Your thoroughness has been well documented. I applaud you for that.
I also agree with you that there have been many forgeries throughout history. Some of them are quite famous. However "my" faith remains firm. But that is for another post. Lets please respect the OP and not digress off topic.

Respectfully

reluctantpawn



posted on Mar, 19 2008 @ 01:09 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 



[somewhat off-topic, but in response to a post by Byrd]
Byrd,
Thanks for the link update. I find that very fascinating.

From Byrd:

(chuckle) No. I can't imagine how you could get a scanner plus power close to some of these sites. Many of them are up in the interior of piles of rock a hundred or more feet above the plain, and most are miles and miles away from the nearest power plug. And some of them are in really odd positions (down near the base of the rocks)




I know that you chuckle at the thought of lugging the scanning equipment to the sites you have photographed.

It really is not out of the realm of practical possibility. In fact
It has been done. At the current state of the art in scanning hardware the equipment is Just slightly larger and heaver than most good photographic equipment.
Of course, some of the petroglyphs may indeed be inaccessible to this method of documentation. And powering the equipment
Is really no problem.

Before you dismiss the possibility out of hand, I invite you to peruse the following information.
And a photograph of my current setup. A standard household flashlight is on top off the scanner for scale. This setup, including point cloud processing software (Rapid Form 2006) represents a
Total investment of approximately $60K USD.

I am merely offering you this information for you edification. In no way am I trying to solicit anything.
Just trying to point out that it is not only possible, but it is now practical.





Recording prehistoric rock art by photogrammetry and laser scanning

“Laser scanning was found to be a good technique for the 3D noncontact
recording of rock art. The equipment is suitable for
use in the field – even in remote locations.”



CASE STUDY 3
As part of the English Heritage Rock Art Pilot Project
(1999), laser scanning as a method of documenting rock art
in the field, was examined. The petroglyphs studied are
located on Rombald’s Moor in West Yorkshire. The areas
scanned were approximately 1.2m ? 0.5m in size. Laser
scanning was found to be a good technique for the 3D noncontact
recording of rock art. The equipment is suitable for
use in the field – even in remote locations.
The petroglyphs on Rombald’s Moor,West Yorkshire.
The data obtained documented the petroglyphs to a high
level of detail. Importantly, the results were not subjective to
lighting conditions at the time of data capture. Indeed, once
the data had been post-processed, and was examined under
varying lighting conditions, a distinct wear pattern was
located on the surface of one of the rocks. This pattern had
not been discernable from photography, nor with the naked
eye. The results of laser scanning can be exploited in a wide
variety of imaging formats, providing a flexible digital
archive. Images of contour maps of the surfaces and a scale
replica in polyurethane were also produced from the data.





“Accessibility is also important, and the equipment required can easily be carried
by one or two people over considerable distances.”



CASE STUDY 8
Recording prehistoric rock art by photogrammetry and laser scanning
Why was scanning was selected?
The photogrammetric technique developed for this project is
user friendly, cost effective and time efficient. For a
monument type such as this, where the carved stones are
relatively small, prolifically scattered and often physical
isolated, these are crucial issues. Accessibility is also
important, and the equipment required can easily be carried
by one or two people over considerable distances. These
attributes make the technique highly suited to the volunteerled
baseline recording part of the project. In contrast, laser
scanning is relatively expensive and requires specialist
equipment and expertise..



posted on Mar, 19 2008 @ 01:20 PM
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posted on Mar, 19 2008 @ 04:30 PM
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Let me answer in another thread rather than derail this one, okay?



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