The Sahara Desert and the pyramids of Egypt

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posted on Jan, 27 2008 @ 02:17 PM
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I thought about adding some information about plasma terra-forming to another one of my threads, but simply do not have enough information yet to do so. Thus, I am creating this one to see what people say and share ideas on this topic, specifically the Pyramids at Giza complex and how it could possibly relate to a large scale catastrophe which rendered the whole of Northern Africa desolate.

I would like to start with the proposition that the Sahara dunes are unnatural, I believe as a hunch that there is just way too much sand there to be accounted for just because of timeless erosion. It is practically all over the place in North Africa in basins. It would seem that generally, winds would move it towards one area or side of the continent. It does not appear this way.

I wonder if anyone has information on the possibility that the Pyramids at Giza were built to account for anything that happened there. I know that the geology includes some volcanism in the midst of the continent and this makes me wonder since the word pyramid means "fire in the middle/midst/within".

Comments?




posted on Jan, 27 2008 @ 02:56 PM
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I dont think so. Deserts are not an uncommon feature on Earth: Sahara just happen to be the biggest. Plus the whole of North Africa is clearly not desolate, many millions live there.



posted on Jan, 27 2008 @ 02:57 PM
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???????? What?????

What was the question again.

I think you were asking if the deserts of africa were not natural.
Yes and no, as the last period of galciation was in full swing, north africa was a temperate savanah, with the subsequent melting of the ice caps in the northern hemisphere, and the brakeing thru of the atlantic ocean past the pillars of hercules to fill the then dry mediteranian basin, there was a major shift in rainfall patterns.
Another reason for the advancing desert was the domestication of sheep and goats.

Sheep and goats are the bringer of deserts.



posted on Jan, 27 2008 @ 03:28 PM
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In the Pleistocene epoch (1.6-11,000 years ago), the Sahara was subjected to humid and then to dry and arid phases, spreading the Sahara Desert into adjacent forests and green areas. About 5,000-6,000 years ago in the post glacial period of our modern epoch, the Holocene, a further succession of dry and humid stages further promoted desertification in the Sahara as well as the Kalahari in southern Africa.

See here for source article.

Perhaps the Sahara Desert was the original Garden of Eden?

If so, the pyramids might be markers for the ancient center of that garden.

You can speculate on anything.



posted on Jan, 27 2008 @ 08:30 PM
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Originally posted by ben91069
I know that the geology includes some volcanism in the midst of the continent and this makes me wonder since the word pyramid means "fire in the middle/midst/within".

Comments?


Though i dont really have any thoughts on your theory i do have some interest in the volcanism of those area's. Both Africa and the Middle East are riddled with volcanos large and small and there is evidence for and accounts of many eruptions throughout those area's that date back thousands of years. There is a depiction of a volcanic event at Catalhoyuk from around 6500bc.



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 11:47 AM
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Originally posted by ben91069
the word pyramid means "fire in the middle/midst/within".

Comments?


Comments? Sure!

Where on Earth did you get that "pyramid" means "fire in the middle/midst/within"???

Are we just going to start making stuff up now? I mean, isn't there some other section of ATS for people that want to write fiction?

Harte



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 12:02 PM
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Originally posted by Harte
Comments? Sure!

Where on Earth did you get that "pyramid" means "fire in the middle/midst/within"???

Are we just going to start making stuff up now? I mean, isn't there some other section of ATS for people that want to write fiction?

Harte


From the Greek words "Pyramis" and "Pyramidos":

Source

The word pyramid is derived from the Greek words PYRAMIS and PYRAMIDOS. The meaning of the word Pryamis is obscure and may relate to the shape of a pyramid. The word Pyramidos has been translated as "Fire In The Middle".



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 01:12 PM
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Strange, I tested using half a dozen greek translators and NONE show up anything on "pyramis" or "pyramidos". That's some seriously elusive words.

This page make another suggestion:

Etymology: French pyramide â Old French piramide â Latin pyramis â Greek ', possibly from a corruption of an Ancient Egyptian phrase or expression (a tentative suggestion: pri-n-mr, "go to the pyramid?", maybe a question asked of ancient Greek tourists), OR from Ancient Egyptian Pir E Mit, "Division of Ten" or "Division of Number" or "Division of Perfection".The Ancient Egyptian word for pyramid is mr'''.



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 03:26 PM
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reply to post by ben91069
 


Your source has a reason to state that fallacious meaning for the word - it supports his ridiculous ideas about the pyramids.

As Merka said,


1552 (earlier in L. form piramis, 1398), from Fr. pyramide (O.Fr. piramide, 12c.), from L. pyramides, pl. of pyramis "one of the pyramids of Egypt," from Gk. pyramis (pl. pyramides), apparently an alteration of Egyptian pimar "pyramid."


Makes plenty of sense that the word would be a corruption of a phrase used by Greek tourists to get a guide to take them to the Great Pyramid.

Fire in the middle? No, I'm sorry, he'll have to do better than that. Maybe it means "Fish God please use your flying chariot to help me cut and stack these giant rocks" or something.

Possibly, it could mean "Harte's got a new book out on how aliens built the G.P. - buy it now."

Harte



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 11:01 PM
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Maybe the word you're looking for is Pyromid?

Obsession with fire. -Pyromania.
en.wikipedia.org...

But kudos to you for seeing a new angle.

I've always thought it was strange that an entire continent was almost covered by Deserts. It's as if something really went wrong there to produce all that sand.

Maybe the Sahara used to be at the bottom of the ocean and it recently came up in the last million years.



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 11:26 PM
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reply to post by Harte
 


Well, it isn't just that site. There are others that show etymology pointing to that definition, but yes it could have been lost in translation between the ancient Egyptian and then to the Greek, where the Greek meaning is something completely different.

The Latin word "pyre" comes from the Greek meaning "fire" and refers to that of a funeral pyre. Maybe they thought it resembled the shape of a giant pyre?? What the significance of "division of ten" or "division of number" would be, I don't know.




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