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acinetobacter baumannii epidemic in Maryland hospital

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posted on Jan, 25 2008 @ 06:38 AM
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RSOE AlertMap

A Maryland hospital is reporting additional cases of a deadly bacteria. St. Agnes confirms a handful of cases of a drug resistant bacteria, but hospital officials won't say how many they're dealing with.



I saw this on the AlertMap this morning. Im going to check to see if there are any more news related articles about this. Apparently, the hospital is not talking, and this was found out via anonymous tipster. Three people have died but its unsure if it was due to this or not.


Wiki - Acinetobacter baumannii


[edit on 25-1-2008 by mrsdudara]




posted on Jan, 25 2008 @ 09:45 PM
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found this link on this "superbug". Pretty scary stuff if it is spreading even if it is confined to a local area.

New Cases Of Deadly Bacteria Found At Md. Hospital

This report comes just over a week after seven cases of the same bacterial infection were discovered at the University Of Maryland Medical Center.

Three of those patients died, but at the time, doctors didn't know what role the bacteria played in their deaths.

"This is like a lot of these multi-drug resistant organisms that people are concerned about. They're smart. They're adaptable," said Dr. Trish Perl from Johns Hopkins Hospital.


Doctors and Nurses need to practice what they preach and wash their hands and keep the hospitals as sanitary as possible, somehow though I think there will continue to be shortcuts taken either due to time constrictions, budget or personal negligence.

eye opening... The dirty truth about docs who don't wash; Patients shouldn't be shy about asking providers to hit the sink, experts say



posted on Jan, 25 2008 @ 09:50 PM
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reply to post by worldwatcher
 


You hit the nail on the head WW. Hand washing is the key for a majority of these infections.

AT least in the ICU Nurses have one maybe 2 patients, but the docs go from room to room and are very very busy. Any breakdown in hand washing and........

Also the influx of families in and out causes problems as well esp. In pediatrics. While its important for mom and dad to be there, the 3rd cousin with the runny nose really should stay at home.



posted on Jan, 28 2008 @ 07:53 AM
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Actually there is about the same thing in the hospital in my home town.



posted on Jan, 30 2008 @ 08:17 PM
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Well, I've been hopeing to update this, but the hospital is still not talking. Isnt that odd? So far all the major news centers, abc, cbs, etc. have reported on this. Still they are not talking, except to say yep its here. They wont say how they are treating it, how bad it is, nothing.



posted on Feb, 1 2008 @ 04:58 PM
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hmm at the hospital in my town where the same thing is going on they called in the help of the milltiairy to setup a emergency IC unit



posted on Feb, 1 2008 @ 05:18 PM
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Seriously?!?!

Where are you, and how do you know? Do you work there or something?



posted on Feb, 2 2008 @ 07:11 AM
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Enschede, The Netherlands.

Everybody knows. It has been on the news and the papers for a few days and today in the paper there was another article about it.



posted on Feb, 2 2008 @ 09:01 AM
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Just a thought here.

A. baumannii is an opportunistic infection that commonly "enters" through a vent, open wound (usually dressed/covered in hospital or covered via a wound vac) or PICC site (Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter, Midline or Mediport aka IV line). The usual "suspect" in the nosocomial infection is poor technique (hand washing) BUT it can be brought in by visitors, housekeeping staff or gifts brought in by loved ones.
The key here is the opportunistic nature of the infection. Yes it stinks that this outbreak has occurred (and I question outbreak status, a handful of people as said in the OP might be less than 10) - BUT - the people getting hammered are truly sick and injured individuals. This isn't the kind of thing that you or I would encounter in our travels unless we are immunocompromised via severe infection, steroid use (prednisone not anabolics) or a Type-2 Diabetic with a nasty open foot wound (cellulitis or osteomyelitis).
Again - the issue at heart here - and a lesson during this ACTIVE Influenza season is TECHNIQUE, TECHNIQUE, TECHNIQUE!... Wash yer darn hands before seeing/touching/visiting a sick loved one (mask too if you can).
I am off my soapbox now...



posted on Feb, 2 2008 @ 12:28 PM
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To my knowledge, hand washing could actually make bacteria immune. Most soaps used have anti-bacterial agents, which are really a form of fungi (like penicillin) that kill bacteria, essentially. But bacteria are not dumb, they can become immune to these things, and in doing so, become immune to many other things, it is really just a matter of time. My point is that hand washing may in fact help the common cold become a super bug. I believe bleach is the only thing that they cant become immune to because it destroys them at an atomic level, ripping atoms off of proteins and destroying the amino acids making up their biological structure.

On another note, I know there has been alot of issues with MRSA (sp?) staph infections in the growing months.

Final comment, who knows what immune bacteria and virus are lurking in hospitals.



posted on Feb, 2 2008 @ 12:33 PM
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People think I am nuts but when we are in hospitals I try to stay freakishly clean..wash hands all the time, don't touch anything if you don't have to, don't even PEE if you don't have to. I hate to even wear my shoes back into the house after I have been in the hospital.

As for the yucky stuffy that is spreading in the hospital, they probably are having a hard time getting rid of it or even getting it under control. Sometimes it takes a bit for doctors to figure out everything that goes with these bugs and what to do for them. But I agree strongly that they don't practice hand-washing enough, obviously!



posted on Feb, 2 2008 @ 03:29 PM
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Most hospitals have a few options. One being soap (not antibacterial - depending on the patient situation - just wash for a few minutes and put on latex or nitrile gloves), one being antibacterial soap and the other a chemical wash that does not require water. Antibacterial soaps that we can buy at a store usually contain Triclosan - that is an kills bacteria and fungi like you were referring to (I believe it is also found in some toothpastes - don't hold me to that). The water free stuff we use contains a high % of ethyl alcohol (like Purell does). But there are other cleaners used that have other chemicals. The cleaning agents the housekeeping staff and OR use are some pretty caustic agents - one for example (and I can't think of the name right now) is diluted down - 3mL cleaning agent, 742mL water - and the stuff kills EVERYTHING - bacteria, fungi and viruses.
I will post some of the stuff the next time I go in...

edit - spelling

[edit on 2-2-2008 by harddrive21]



posted on Feb, 2 2008 @ 03:41 PM
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reply to post by midnightrider07
 


One more thing about MRSA - Just to throw this out there - the rates of Penicillin Resistant Staph have gone up. I won't argue that. I can verify it. From the infectious disease point - most of my patients now with MRSA fall into a VERY SPECIFIC GROUP.
...............Drum Roll Please.....................

Type 2 Diabetics.

The cellulitis or osteomyelitis they develop are EVIL. Most patients do not take care of themselves, do not keep clean (and I mean home environment and bathing/washing daily) do not manage their blood sugars and have these cuts that turn into divots. Most in this group have been on antibiotics (oral and IV) many, many times before. Lucky patients will have 4 weeks of home IV antibiotic therapy. Most are 6 to 8. Some even longer.
Lucky patients will be able to use Cefepime (4th gen cephalosporin) because it is not MRSA - just a regular Staph infection. Most are on Vancomycin because it is MRSA. I have had a few VRE's, but thank God not many.

I have a few...and by few I mean maybe 3 right now...patients with MRSA that are unlucky lotto winners - post surgical infections or just plain unlucky. The vast majority (90+%), again, are Type 2 Diabetics that do not control their blood sugar.

I am positive I will take some criticism here for this post - but I am reporting what I see on a daily basis.



posted on Feb, 3 2008 @ 11:30 AM
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Originally posted by midnightrider07
To my knowledge, hand washing could actually make bacteria immune. Most soaps used have anti-bacterial agents, which are really a form of fungi (like penicillin) that kill bacteria, essentially. But bacteria are not dumb, they can become immune to these things, and in doing so, become immune to many other things, it is really just a matter of time. My point is that hand washing may in fact help the common cold become a super bug. I believe bleach is the only thing that they cant become immune to because it destroys them at an atomic level, ripping atoms off of proteins and destroying the amino acids making up their biological structure.

On another note, I know there has been alot of issues with MRSA (sp?) staph infections in the growing months.

Final comment, who knows what immune bacteria and virus are lurking in hospitals.


Triclosan kills bacteria, not viruses. MRSA can be treated, BUT you have to be on top of that before it has a chance to spread and get worse, which most people do not do. I would think that workers clean the hospital with a bleach/water mixture, but who knows. Common sense would tell you to, with all of the germs being taken in and out.



posted on Feb, 3 2008 @ 11:46 AM
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Juicy - The cleaning supplies used are not a bleach and water mixture. Though that is effective to a point. For example, in a clean room (class 100) when we pass things into it, using a Lysol bleach wipe (that are sold in the tubes you can get in any store) is not good enough to clean off particulate matter and disinfect. A more "industrial" cleaner is used (can't think of what it is right now - I can get back to you if you like).



posted on Feb, 10 2008 @ 01:29 PM
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reply to post by harddrive21
 


Thanks for all the information. I would like to know the name of the cleaning agent you are talking about.


As to the OP... thank you for the link to the RSOE EDIS site. I have added it to my bookmarks. Great post!!



posted on Feb, 11 2008 @ 10:57 AM
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Here is an updated news link for you all.

ABC

It tells the rest of the story, and continues to give more info on this wonderful bug that has come to us all the way from Iraq.



yankeerose, you are welcome. I have it in my bookmarks as well thanks to another poster here on ATS. Its a great way to keep up to date on news that never seems to make it to the local tv news channels.



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